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Multimodal emotion perception after anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL).

Milesi V, Cekic S, Péron J, Frühholz S, Cristinzio C, Seeck M, Grandjean D - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: Lesion size had the greatest effect on intensity perceptions and accuracy in the visual modality, irrespective of the type of emotion.These new findings suggest that a damaged amygdala, or a disrupted bundle between the amygdala and the ventral part of the occipital lobe, has a greater impact on emotion perception in the visual modality than it does in either the vocal or audiovisual one.We can surmise that patients are able to use the auditory information contained in multimodal stimuli to compensate for difficulty processing visually conveyed emotion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, University of Geneva Geneva, Switzerland ; Neuroscience of Emotion and Affective Dynamics Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Geneva Geneva, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
In the context of emotion information processing, several studies have demonstrated the involvement of the amygdala in emotion perception, for unimodal and multimodal stimuli. However, it seems that not only the amygdala, but several regions around it, may also play a major role in multimodal emotional integration. In order to investigate the contribution of these regions to multimodal emotion perception, five patients who had undergone unilateral anterior temporal lobe resection were exposed to both unimodal (vocal or visual) and audiovisual emotional and neutral stimuli. In a classic paradigm, participants were asked to rate the emotional intensity of angry, fearful, joyful, and neutral stimuli on visual analog scales. Compared with matched controls, patients exhibited impaired categorization of joyful expressions, whether the stimuli were auditory, visual, or audiovisual. Patients confused joyful faces with neutral faces, and joyful prosody with surprise. In the case of fear, unlike matched controls, patients provided lower intensity ratings for visual stimuli than for vocal and audiovisual ones. Fearful faces were frequently confused with surprised ones. When we controlled for lesion size, we no longer observed any overall difference between patients and controls in their ratings of emotional intensity on the target scales. Lesion size had the greatest effect on intensity perceptions and accuracy in the visual modality, irrespective of the type of emotion. These new findings suggest that a damaged amygdala, or a disrupted bundle between the amygdala and the ventral part of the occipital lobe, has a greater impact on emotion perception in the visual modality than it does in either the vocal or audiovisual one. We can surmise that patients are able to use the auditory information contained in multimodal stimuli to compensate for difficulty processing visually conveyed emotion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Boxplot of GLM results for intensity ratings of each emotion on the corresponding target scale. Each box corresponds to a specific modality (A: auditory, AV: audiovisual, V: visual) and a specific group (patients vs. controls). The difference between A and AV for the controls is almost invisible, as zero values data were included in the plot. *Indicates a significant difference between modalities (pairwise).
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Figure 3: Boxplot of GLM results for intensity ratings of each emotion on the corresponding target scale. Each box corresponds to a specific modality (A: auditory, AV: audiovisual, V: visual) and a specific group (patients vs. controls). The difference between A and AV for the controls is almost invisible, as zero values data were included in the plot. *Indicates a significant difference between modalities (pairwise).

Mentions: Using a GLM, we first compared the two groups on each specific emotion in each specific modality, controlling for sex, age, and normalized lesion size, and adding participant and stimulus ID as random effects. No significant results were observed, even for the fear items. However, when we ran pairwise comparisons of the modalities for a specific emotion on its target scale and for a specific group, we did observe significant effects, especially for the three emotions (see Figure 3). Patients provided higher intensity ratings of audiovisual versus unimodal visual information for angry (z = -4.14, p < 0.001), joyful (z = -6.14, p < 0.001), fearful (z = -8.45, p < 0.001), and neutral (z = -5.61, p < 0.001) items. They also provided higher intensity ratings of auditory versus visual information for the same emotions (anger: z = -4.14, p < 0.001; joy: z = -6.14, p < 0.001; fear: z = -8.45, p < 0.001; neutral: z = -5.61, p < 0.001). The differences between audiovisual and unimodal auditory information were not significant for any of the emotions (p > 0.15). In the control group, a slightly different pattern emerged for anger and joy. Anger was given a higher intensity rating in the audiovisual condition than in either the auditory (z = -3.27, p < 0.001) or visual (z = -10.93, p < 0.001) condition, and a higher rating in the auditory condition than in the visual one (z = -6.94, p < 0.001). For joy, audiovisual information was perceived of as more intense than visual information (z = -12.69, p < 0.001), but auditory information was given a higher intensity rating than both audiovisual information (z = 3.07, p < 0.005) and visual information (z = -15.58, p < 0.001). Finally, fear stimuli were rated as more intense in the audiovisual modality than in the visual one (z = -11.74, p < 0.001), and also more intense in the auditory modality than in the visual one (z = -12.33, p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed between the modalities for neutral stimuli (p > 0.4).


Multimodal emotion perception after anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL).

Milesi V, Cekic S, Péron J, Frühholz S, Cristinzio C, Seeck M, Grandjean D - Front Hum Neurosci (2014)

Boxplot of GLM results for intensity ratings of each emotion on the corresponding target scale. Each box corresponds to a specific modality (A: auditory, AV: audiovisual, V: visual) and a specific group (patients vs. controls). The difference between A and AV for the controls is almost invisible, as zero values data were included in the plot. *Indicates a significant difference between modalities (pairwise).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4017134&req=5

Figure 3: Boxplot of GLM results for intensity ratings of each emotion on the corresponding target scale. Each box corresponds to a specific modality (A: auditory, AV: audiovisual, V: visual) and a specific group (patients vs. controls). The difference between A and AV for the controls is almost invisible, as zero values data were included in the plot. *Indicates a significant difference between modalities (pairwise).
Mentions: Using a GLM, we first compared the two groups on each specific emotion in each specific modality, controlling for sex, age, and normalized lesion size, and adding participant and stimulus ID as random effects. No significant results were observed, even for the fear items. However, when we ran pairwise comparisons of the modalities for a specific emotion on its target scale and for a specific group, we did observe significant effects, especially for the three emotions (see Figure 3). Patients provided higher intensity ratings of audiovisual versus unimodal visual information for angry (z = -4.14, p < 0.001), joyful (z = -6.14, p < 0.001), fearful (z = -8.45, p < 0.001), and neutral (z = -5.61, p < 0.001) items. They also provided higher intensity ratings of auditory versus visual information for the same emotions (anger: z = -4.14, p < 0.001; joy: z = -6.14, p < 0.001; fear: z = -8.45, p < 0.001; neutral: z = -5.61, p < 0.001). The differences between audiovisual and unimodal auditory information were not significant for any of the emotions (p > 0.15). In the control group, a slightly different pattern emerged for anger and joy. Anger was given a higher intensity rating in the audiovisual condition than in either the auditory (z = -3.27, p < 0.001) or visual (z = -10.93, p < 0.001) condition, and a higher rating in the auditory condition than in the visual one (z = -6.94, p < 0.001). For joy, audiovisual information was perceived of as more intense than visual information (z = -12.69, p < 0.001), but auditory information was given a higher intensity rating than both audiovisual information (z = 3.07, p < 0.005) and visual information (z = -15.58, p < 0.001). Finally, fear stimuli were rated as more intense in the audiovisual modality than in the visual one (z = -11.74, p < 0.001), and also more intense in the auditory modality than in the visual one (z = -12.33, p < 0.001). No significant differences were observed between the modalities for neutral stimuli (p > 0.4).

Bottom Line: Lesion size had the greatest effect on intensity perceptions and accuracy in the visual modality, irrespective of the type of emotion.These new findings suggest that a damaged amygdala, or a disrupted bundle between the amygdala and the ventral part of the occipital lobe, has a greater impact on emotion perception in the visual modality than it does in either the vocal or audiovisual one.We can surmise that patients are able to use the auditory information contained in multimodal stimuli to compensate for difficulty processing visually conveyed emotion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, University of Geneva Geneva, Switzerland ; Neuroscience of Emotion and Affective Dynamics Laboratory, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Geneva Geneva, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
In the context of emotion information processing, several studies have demonstrated the involvement of the amygdala in emotion perception, for unimodal and multimodal stimuli. However, it seems that not only the amygdala, but several regions around it, may also play a major role in multimodal emotional integration. In order to investigate the contribution of these regions to multimodal emotion perception, five patients who had undergone unilateral anterior temporal lobe resection were exposed to both unimodal (vocal or visual) and audiovisual emotional and neutral stimuli. In a classic paradigm, participants were asked to rate the emotional intensity of angry, fearful, joyful, and neutral stimuli on visual analog scales. Compared with matched controls, patients exhibited impaired categorization of joyful expressions, whether the stimuli were auditory, visual, or audiovisual. Patients confused joyful faces with neutral faces, and joyful prosody with surprise. In the case of fear, unlike matched controls, patients provided lower intensity ratings for visual stimuli than for vocal and audiovisual ones. Fearful faces were frequently confused with surprised ones. When we controlled for lesion size, we no longer observed any overall difference between patients and controls in their ratings of emotional intensity on the target scales. Lesion size had the greatest effect on intensity perceptions and accuracy in the visual modality, irrespective of the type of emotion. These new findings suggest that a damaged amygdala, or a disrupted bundle between the amygdala and the ventral part of the occipital lobe, has a greater impact on emotion perception in the visual modality than it does in either the vocal or audiovisual one. We can surmise that patients are able to use the auditory information contained in multimodal stimuli to compensate for difficulty processing visually conveyed emotion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus