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Management of the 2012 Legionella crisis in Quebec City: need for a better communication between resources and knowledge transfer.

Trudel L, Veillette M, Bonifait L, Duchaine C - Front Microbiol (2014)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Département de Biochimie, Microbiologie et Bio-Informatique, Faculté des Sciences et de Génie, Université Laval Québec, QC, Canada.

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The water to be cooled, the temperature of which usually varies between 25 and 40°C, is pulverized upward in the cooling tower using forced ventilation, loading the air released by the tower with steam created by the evaporation stream and tiny droplets which are the preferred conveyers for this pulmonary pathogen (Keller et al., )... The factors known to favor the proliferation of legionellae are the temperature (25–40°C), stagnancy, presence of sediments, scale, biofilms and corrosion, as well as the presence of amoebas and ciliate protozoans that could support the Legionella intracellular growth, all conditions found in cooling towers during summertime (Buse et al., )... The report from the DSP published after the Quebec City 2012 legionellosis outbreak (Isabelle Goupil Sormany, ) is a precious information source when trying to explain the extended delay between the first cases and the resolution of the crisis... A second wave of intervention, entitled « mandatory measures » was set off as of August 14th and aimed at: Identify the cooling towers in the area where the highest number of affected people were found; Identify the contamination source using water samples; Perform a visual evaluation of the cooling towers maintenance; Proceed to the sanitization whilst awaiting the analyses results; Prescribe control measures according to the results obtained from the water samples and observations from the cooling towers inspections... The delay of almost 2 months could have been noticeably reduced if academic or private research laboratories had been involved from the start... What would have been the advantages of consulting and using the expertise found locally or internationally? Other laboratories are active in the aerosol science research and also possess the equipment required for Legionella aerosol measurement and detection... The research laboratories might not be sufficiently present and known by the governmental organizations; The governmental administration has the tendency to use its own resources when faced with such situation... On one side, the governmental administration could have made more efforts to build a complete database of skilled scientists in this field (water research, infectious disease specialists, environmental microbiologists, bioaerosols scientists) and use this expertise even if outside of the government administration regular network... Most likely, the governmental administration was not aware of the research capacity and expertise available... The quick integration of a multi-disciplinary special team with diverse field of expertises would have certainly speed up the process and, maybe, even saved a few lives... This sad story reinforced the importance of the de-compartmentalization of the research laboratories and, unfortunately, the public health office new action plans do not mention this type of integration... If they want to be consulted during such crises, maybe the research experts should build their own database and make it readily available to the numerous governmental agencies... It should be noted that this crisis led to new regulations amending the safety code incorporating provisions relating to the maintenance of cooling towers' water and that use of qPCR will soon be authorized to quantify Legionella in cooling towers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Important dates and actions during the 2012 legionellosis outbreak in Quebec (modified from the “Rapport du directeur de la santé publique, François Desbiens, M.D. Éclosion de légionelles dans la ville de Québec”).
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Figure 1: Important dates and actions during the 2012 legionellosis outbreak in Quebec (modified from the “Rapport du directeur de la santé publique, François Desbiens, M.D. Éclosion de légionelles dans la ville de Québec”).

Mentions: The report from the DSP published after the Quebec City 2012 legionellosis outbreak (Isabelle Goupil Sormany, 2012) is a precious information source when trying to explain the extended delay between the first cases and the resolution of the crisis. Figure 1 shows the evolution of the situation and lists key dates of the outbreak of Legionella in Quebec City during summer 2012.


Management of the 2012 Legionella crisis in Quebec City: need for a better communication between resources and knowledge transfer.

Trudel L, Veillette M, Bonifait L, Duchaine C - Front Microbiol (2014)

Important dates and actions during the 2012 legionellosis outbreak in Quebec (modified from the “Rapport du directeur de la santé publique, François Desbiens, M.D. Éclosion de légionelles dans la ville de Québec”).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4017129&req=5

Figure 1: Important dates and actions during the 2012 legionellosis outbreak in Quebec (modified from the “Rapport du directeur de la santé publique, François Desbiens, M.D. Éclosion de légionelles dans la ville de Québec”).
Mentions: The report from the DSP published after the Quebec City 2012 legionellosis outbreak (Isabelle Goupil Sormany, 2012) is a precious information source when trying to explain the extended delay between the first cases and the resolution of the crisis. Figure 1 shows the evolution of the situation and lists key dates of the outbreak of Legionella in Quebec City during summer 2012.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Département de Biochimie, Microbiologie et Bio-Informatique, Faculté des Sciences et de Génie, Université Laval Québec, QC, Canada.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The water to be cooled, the temperature of which usually varies between 25 and 40°C, is pulverized upward in the cooling tower using forced ventilation, loading the air released by the tower with steam created by the evaporation stream and tiny droplets which are the preferred conveyers for this pulmonary pathogen (Keller et al., )... The factors known to favor the proliferation of legionellae are the temperature (25–40°C), stagnancy, presence of sediments, scale, biofilms and corrosion, as well as the presence of amoebas and ciliate protozoans that could support the Legionella intracellular growth, all conditions found in cooling towers during summertime (Buse et al., )... The report from the DSP published after the Quebec City 2012 legionellosis outbreak (Isabelle Goupil Sormany, ) is a precious information source when trying to explain the extended delay between the first cases and the resolution of the crisis... A second wave of intervention, entitled « mandatory measures » was set off as of August 14th and aimed at: Identify the cooling towers in the area where the highest number of affected people were found; Identify the contamination source using water samples; Perform a visual evaluation of the cooling towers maintenance; Proceed to the sanitization whilst awaiting the analyses results; Prescribe control measures according to the results obtained from the water samples and observations from the cooling towers inspections... The delay of almost 2 months could have been noticeably reduced if academic or private research laboratories had been involved from the start... What would have been the advantages of consulting and using the expertise found locally or internationally? Other laboratories are active in the aerosol science research and also possess the equipment required for Legionella aerosol measurement and detection... The research laboratories might not be sufficiently present and known by the governmental organizations; The governmental administration has the tendency to use its own resources when faced with such situation... On one side, the governmental administration could have made more efforts to build a complete database of skilled scientists in this field (water research, infectious disease specialists, environmental microbiologists, bioaerosols scientists) and use this expertise even if outside of the government administration regular network... Most likely, the governmental administration was not aware of the research capacity and expertise available... The quick integration of a multi-disciplinary special team with diverse field of expertises would have certainly speed up the process and, maybe, even saved a few lives... This sad story reinforced the importance of the de-compartmentalization of the research laboratories and, unfortunately, the public health office new action plans do not mention this type of integration... If they want to be consulted during such crises, maybe the research experts should build their own database and make it readily available to the numerous governmental agencies... It should be noted that this crisis led to new regulations amending the safety code incorporating provisions relating to the maintenance of cooling towers' water and that use of qPCR will soon be authorized to quantify Legionella in cooling towers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus