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Source analysis of short and long latency vestibular-evoked potentials (VsEPs) produced by left vs. right ear air-conducted 500 Hz tone pips.

Todd NP, Paillard AC, Kluk K, Whittle E, Colebatch JG - Hear. Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: Statistical analysis of the vestibular dependent responses indicated a contralateral effect for inion related short-latency responses and a left-ear/right-hemisphere advantage for the long-latency responses.In addition we found evidence of a possible vestibular contribution to the auditory T-complex in radial temporal lobe sources.These last results raise the possibility that acoustic activation of the otolith organs could potentially contribute to auditory processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Life Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK. Electronic address: neil.todd@manchester.ac.uk.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Source current waveforms for 8 pair BESA model of (A) left and (B) right ear stimulation at supra-threshold intensities. Source waveforms and locations for 4 pair model of left ear stimulation. Ocular sources red (left) and orange (right); cingulate sources dark (left) and light blue (right); temporal sources dark (left) and light green (right) (tangential and radial sources shown separately); and cerebellar sources dark (left) and light mauve (right). (For interpretation of the references to colour in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)
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fig8: Source current waveforms for 8 pair BESA model of (A) left and (B) right ear stimulation at supra-threshold intensities. Source waveforms and locations for 4 pair model of left ear stimulation. Ocular sources red (left) and orange (right); cingulate sources dark (left) and light blue (right); temporal sources dark (left) and light green (right) (tangential and radial sources shown separately); and cerebellar sources dark (left) and light mauve (right). (For interpretation of the references to colour in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

Mentions: In order to illustrate further the temporal pattern and divergences in behaviour, current source waveforms and transverse view locations are shown in Fig. 8 with the corresponding coronal and sagittal view locations given in Fig. 9. The source waveforms are shown in approximate location from anterior to posterior. The source current strengths are given in Table 3. Considering first the ocular and cerebellar sources, these show early bilateral activation corresponding with the short-latency VsEPs. An asymmetry is apparent in that the right ear stimulation produces a highly lateralised early cerebellar response (lobes 1 and 2) while for left ear stimulation the cerebellar response is more bilateral (see also Table 3). For the ocular sources the largest currents occur during the second lobe bilaterally for left ear stimulation. The cingulate sources show activation over the whole epoch but the largest currents occur during the later part of the epoch. For the N42 (lobe 4) the cingulate contribution is contralateral. However, for the N1 waves the right-hemisphere cingulate source is largest for both left and right ear stimulation (2 vs. 11 nA for left ear and 4 vs. 10 nA for right ear stimulation).


Source analysis of short and long latency vestibular-evoked potentials (VsEPs) produced by left vs. right ear air-conducted 500 Hz tone pips.

Todd NP, Paillard AC, Kluk K, Whittle E, Colebatch JG - Hear. Res. (2014)

Source current waveforms for 8 pair BESA model of (A) left and (B) right ear stimulation at supra-threshold intensities. Source waveforms and locations for 4 pair model of left ear stimulation. Ocular sources red (left) and orange (right); cingulate sources dark (left) and light blue (right); temporal sources dark (left) and light green (right) (tangential and radial sources shown separately); and cerebellar sources dark (left) and light mauve (right). (For interpretation of the references to colour in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4017095&req=5

fig8: Source current waveforms for 8 pair BESA model of (A) left and (B) right ear stimulation at supra-threshold intensities. Source waveforms and locations for 4 pair model of left ear stimulation. Ocular sources red (left) and orange (right); cingulate sources dark (left) and light blue (right); temporal sources dark (left) and light green (right) (tangential and radial sources shown separately); and cerebellar sources dark (left) and light mauve (right). (For interpretation of the references to colour in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)
Mentions: In order to illustrate further the temporal pattern and divergences in behaviour, current source waveforms and transverse view locations are shown in Fig. 8 with the corresponding coronal and sagittal view locations given in Fig. 9. The source waveforms are shown in approximate location from anterior to posterior. The source current strengths are given in Table 3. Considering first the ocular and cerebellar sources, these show early bilateral activation corresponding with the short-latency VsEPs. An asymmetry is apparent in that the right ear stimulation produces a highly lateralised early cerebellar response (lobes 1 and 2) while for left ear stimulation the cerebellar response is more bilateral (see also Table 3). For the ocular sources the largest currents occur during the second lobe bilaterally for left ear stimulation. The cingulate sources show activation over the whole epoch but the largest currents occur during the later part of the epoch. For the N42 (lobe 4) the cingulate contribution is contralateral. However, for the N1 waves the right-hemisphere cingulate source is largest for both left and right ear stimulation (2 vs. 11 nA for left ear and 4 vs. 10 nA for right ear stimulation).

Bottom Line: Statistical analysis of the vestibular dependent responses indicated a contralateral effect for inion related short-latency responses and a left-ear/right-hemisphere advantage for the long-latency responses.In addition we found evidence of a possible vestibular contribution to the auditory T-complex in radial temporal lobe sources.These last results raise the possibility that acoustic activation of the otolith organs could potentially contribute to auditory processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Life Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK. Electronic address: neil.todd@manchester.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus