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Source analysis of short and long latency vestibular-evoked potentials (VsEPs) produced by left vs. right ear air-conducted 500 Hz tone pips.

Todd NP, Paillard AC, Kluk K, Whittle E, Colebatch JG - Hear. Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: Statistical analysis of the vestibular dependent responses indicated a contralateral effect for inion related short-latency responses and a left-ear/right-hemisphere advantage for the long-latency responses.In addition we found evidence of a possible vestibular contribution to the auditory T-complex in radial temporal lobe sources.These last results raise the possibility that acoustic activation of the otolith organs could potentially contribute to auditory processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Life Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK. Electronic address: neil.todd@manchester.ac.uk.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Source waveforms and locations for 4 pair model of (A) left and (B) right ear stimulation at supra-threshold intensity applied to the sub-threshold data.
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fig10: Source waveforms and locations for 4 pair model of (A) left and (B) right ear stimulation at supra-threshold intensity applied to the sub-threshold data.

Mentions: As comparative solutions with 4 pairs could not be obtained for the sub-threshold cases we show in Fig. 10 the results of the source waveforms using the supra-threshold solutions. There is clearly no early activity in the ocular sources in the sub-threshold cases and the later activity corresponds to eye movements during the epoch. Similarly there is little activity in the cerebellar sources. For the cingulate sources there is activity at the latency of the P2 but little or no activity associated with the N1. As expected for the N1 the largest activity is found in the temporal sources. For left ear stimulation the N1 activation is strongly lateralised to the right hemisphere in the tangential component, with some activity in the contralateral radial component. For right ear stimulation the activity is more evenly distributed among the components on both sides for both N1 and P2, but again with some evidence of activity in the contralateral radial component. Although there is some evidence of the T100 in the radial component following the N1, it is small or inconsistent in the sub-threshold cases compared with the supra-threshold cases.


Source analysis of short and long latency vestibular-evoked potentials (VsEPs) produced by left vs. right ear air-conducted 500 Hz tone pips.

Todd NP, Paillard AC, Kluk K, Whittle E, Colebatch JG - Hear. Res. (2014)

Source waveforms and locations for 4 pair model of (A) left and (B) right ear stimulation at supra-threshold intensity applied to the sub-threshold data.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4017095&req=5

fig10: Source waveforms and locations for 4 pair model of (A) left and (B) right ear stimulation at supra-threshold intensity applied to the sub-threshold data.
Mentions: As comparative solutions with 4 pairs could not be obtained for the sub-threshold cases we show in Fig. 10 the results of the source waveforms using the supra-threshold solutions. There is clearly no early activity in the ocular sources in the sub-threshold cases and the later activity corresponds to eye movements during the epoch. Similarly there is little activity in the cerebellar sources. For the cingulate sources there is activity at the latency of the P2 but little or no activity associated with the N1. As expected for the N1 the largest activity is found in the temporal sources. For left ear stimulation the N1 activation is strongly lateralised to the right hemisphere in the tangential component, with some activity in the contralateral radial component. For right ear stimulation the activity is more evenly distributed among the components on both sides for both N1 and P2, but again with some evidence of activity in the contralateral radial component. Although there is some evidence of the T100 in the radial component following the N1, it is small or inconsistent in the sub-threshold cases compared with the supra-threshold cases.

Bottom Line: Statistical analysis of the vestibular dependent responses indicated a contralateral effect for inion related short-latency responses and a left-ear/right-hemisphere advantage for the long-latency responses.In addition we found evidence of a possible vestibular contribution to the auditory T-complex in radial temporal lobe sources.These last results raise the possibility that acoustic activation of the otolith organs could potentially contribute to auditory processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Life Science, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK. Electronic address: neil.todd@manchester.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus