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Absence of cospeciation between the uncultured Frankia microsymbionts and the disjunct actinorhizal Coriaria species.

Nouioui I, Ghodhbane-Gtari F, Fernandez MP, Boudabous A, Normand P, Gtari M - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: This symbiotic association has drawn interest because of the disjunct geographical distribution of Coriaria in four separate areas of the world and in the context of evolutionary relationships between host plants and their uncultured microsymbionts.Total DNA extracted from root nodules collected from five species: C. myrtifolia, C. arborea, C. nepalensis, C. japonica, and C. microphylla, growing in the Mediterranean area (Morocco and France), New Zealand, Pakistan, Japan, and Mexico, respectively, was used to amplify glnA gene (glutamine synthetase), dnaA gene (chromosome replication initiator), and the nif DK IGS (intergenic spacer between nifD and nifK genes) in Frankia and the matK gene (chloroplast-encoded maturase K) and the intergenic transcribed spacers (18S rRNA-ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2-28S rRNA) in Coriaria species.Phylogenetic reconstruction indicated that the radiations of Frankia strains and Coriaria species are not congruent.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire Microorganismes et Biomolécules Actives, Université de Tunis El Manar (FST) et Université Carthage (INSAT), 2092 Tunis, Tunisia.

ABSTRACT
Coriaria is an actinorhizal plant that forms root nodules in symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing actinobacteria of the genus Frankia. This symbiotic association has drawn interest because of the disjunct geographical distribution of Coriaria in four separate areas of the world and in the context of evolutionary relationships between host plants and their uncultured microsymbionts. The evolution of Frankia-Coriaria symbioses was examined from a phylogenetic viewpoint using multiple genetic markers in both bacteria and host-plant partners. Total DNA extracted from root nodules collected from five species: C. myrtifolia, C. arborea, C. nepalensis, C. japonica, and C. microphylla, growing in the Mediterranean area (Morocco and France), New Zealand, Pakistan, Japan, and Mexico, respectively, was used to amplify glnA gene (glutamine synthetase), dnaA gene (chromosome replication initiator), and the nif DK IGS (intergenic spacer between nifD and nifK genes) in Frankia and the matK gene (chloroplast-encoded maturase K) and the intergenic transcribed spacers (18S rRNA-ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2-28S rRNA) in Coriaria species. Phylogenetic reconstruction indicated that the radiations of Frankia strains and Coriaria species are not congruent. The lack of cospeciation between the two symbiotic partners may be explained by host shift at high taxonomic rank together with wind dispersal and/or survival in nonhost rhizosphere.

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Phylogenetic trees of the Frankia microsymbionts (left) and the Coriaria host plants (right). The Frankia tree was constructed using the glnA, dnaA, and the nifD-K intergenic spacer, while the Coriaria tree was done using the matK and the 18S rRNA-ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2-28S rRNA with ML method using strain CcI3 and Casuarina as outgroups respectively for Frankia and hot plant phylogenetic trees. The numbers at branches indicate bootstrap results above 50%. Lines are drawn between the microsymbionts and their hosts. The color code indicates the place of origin of the leave or of the set when homogenous. The groups numbers 1 and 2 on the right are according to Yokoyama et al. [19].
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fig1: Phylogenetic trees of the Frankia microsymbionts (left) and the Coriaria host plants (right). The Frankia tree was constructed using the glnA, dnaA, and the nifD-K intergenic spacer, while the Coriaria tree was done using the matK and the 18S rRNA-ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2-28S rRNA with ML method using strain CcI3 and Casuarina as outgroups respectively for Frankia and hot plant phylogenetic trees. The numbers at branches indicate bootstrap results above 50%. Lines are drawn between the microsymbionts and their hosts. The color code indicates the place of origin of the leave or of the set when homogenous. The groups numbers 1 and 2 on the right are according to Yokoyama et al. [19].

Mentions: The topologies of the trees obtained for the two symbiotic partners were not congruent (Figure 1). Moreover, global distance-based ParaFit analysis recovered mostly random associations between Frankia and Coriaria host plant species (p = 0.33) and rejected cospeciation hypothesis. On the microbial side, the New Zealand microsymbionts were at the root (Group A); then three groups emerged, group B comprising the Pakistani, Mexican, and Mediterranean symbionts from France, group C comprising microsymbionts from Morocco, and then group D comprising French and Japanese microsymbionts as well as the Dg1 reference sequence obtained initially from a Pakistani soil. On the host plant side, group 1 at the root comprises New Zealand and South American sequences, while group 2 comprises the Japanese, Mediterranean, and Pakistani sequences.


Absence of cospeciation between the uncultured Frankia microsymbionts and the disjunct actinorhizal Coriaria species.

Nouioui I, Ghodhbane-Gtari F, Fernandez MP, Boudabous A, Normand P, Gtari M - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Phylogenetic trees of the Frankia microsymbionts (left) and the Coriaria host plants (right). The Frankia tree was constructed using the glnA, dnaA, and the nifD-K intergenic spacer, while the Coriaria tree was done using the matK and the 18S rRNA-ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2-28S rRNA with ML method using strain CcI3 and Casuarina as outgroups respectively for Frankia and hot plant phylogenetic trees. The numbers at branches indicate bootstrap results above 50%. Lines are drawn between the microsymbionts and their hosts. The color code indicates the place of origin of the leave or of the set when homogenous. The groups numbers 1 and 2 on the right are according to Yokoyama et al. [19].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016943&req=5

fig1: Phylogenetic trees of the Frankia microsymbionts (left) and the Coriaria host plants (right). The Frankia tree was constructed using the glnA, dnaA, and the nifD-K intergenic spacer, while the Coriaria tree was done using the matK and the 18S rRNA-ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2-28S rRNA with ML method using strain CcI3 and Casuarina as outgroups respectively for Frankia and hot plant phylogenetic trees. The numbers at branches indicate bootstrap results above 50%. Lines are drawn between the microsymbionts and their hosts. The color code indicates the place of origin of the leave or of the set when homogenous. The groups numbers 1 and 2 on the right are according to Yokoyama et al. [19].
Mentions: The topologies of the trees obtained for the two symbiotic partners were not congruent (Figure 1). Moreover, global distance-based ParaFit analysis recovered mostly random associations between Frankia and Coriaria host plant species (p = 0.33) and rejected cospeciation hypothesis. On the microbial side, the New Zealand microsymbionts were at the root (Group A); then three groups emerged, group B comprising the Pakistani, Mexican, and Mediterranean symbionts from France, group C comprising microsymbionts from Morocco, and then group D comprising French and Japanese microsymbionts as well as the Dg1 reference sequence obtained initially from a Pakistani soil. On the host plant side, group 1 at the root comprises New Zealand and South American sequences, while group 2 comprises the Japanese, Mediterranean, and Pakistani sequences.

Bottom Line: This symbiotic association has drawn interest because of the disjunct geographical distribution of Coriaria in four separate areas of the world and in the context of evolutionary relationships between host plants and their uncultured microsymbionts.Total DNA extracted from root nodules collected from five species: C. myrtifolia, C. arborea, C. nepalensis, C. japonica, and C. microphylla, growing in the Mediterranean area (Morocco and France), New Zealand, Pakistan, Japan, and Mexico, respectively, was used to amplify glnA gene (glutamine synthetase), dnaA gene (chromosome replication initiator), and the nif DK IGS (intergenic spacer between nifD and nifK genes) in Frankia and the matK gene (chloroplast-encoded maturase K) and the intergenic transcribed spacers (18S rRNA-ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2-28S rRNA) in Coriaria species.Phylogenetic reconstruction indicated that the radiations of Frankia strains and Coriaria species are not congruent.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire Microorganismes et Biomolécules Actives, Université de Tunis El Manar (FST) et Université Carthage (INSAT), 2092 Tunis, Tunisia.

ABSTRACT
Coriaria is an actinorhizal plant that forms root nodules in symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing actinobacteria of the genus Frankia. This symbiotic association has drawn interest because of the disjunct geographical distribution of Coriaria in four separate areas of the world and in the context of evolutionary relationships between host plants and their uncultured microsymbionts. The evolution of Frankia-Coriaria symbioses was examined from a phylogenetic viewpoint using multiple genetic markers in both bacteria and host-plant partners. Total DNA extracted from root nodules collected from five species: C. myrtifolia, C. arborea, C. nepalensis, C. japonica, and C. microphylla, growing in the Mediterranean area (Morocco and France), New Zealand, Pakistan, Japan, and Mexico, respectively, was used to amplify glnA gene (glutamine synthetase), dnaA gene (chromosome replication initiator), and the nif DK IGS (intergenic spacer between nifD and nifK genes) in Frankia and the matK gene (chloroplast-encoded maturase K) and the intergenic transcribed spacers (18S rRNA-ITS1-5.8S rRNA-ITS2-28S rRNA) in Coriaria species. Phylogenetic reconstruction indicated that the radiations of Frankia strains and Coriaria species are not congruent. The lack of cospeciation between the two symbiotic partners may be explained by host shift at high taxonomic rank together with wind dispersal and/or survival in nonhost rhizosphere.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus