Limits...
Libidibia ferrea mature seeds promote antinociceptive effect by peripheral and central pathway: possible involvement of opioid and cholinergic receptors.

Sawada LA, Monteiro VS, Rabelo GR, Dias GB, Da Cunha M, do Nascimento JL, Bastos Gde N - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Bottom Line: We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF), partially elucidating their mechanisms.LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties.Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Neuroquímica Molecular e Celular, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA), Rua Augusto Correa s/n, Guamá, 66075-900 Belém, PA, Brazil ; Laboratório de Neuroinflamação, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA), Rua Augusto Correa s/n, Guamá, 66075-900 Belém, PA, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Libidibia ferrea (LF) is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF), partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg), naloxone (5 mg/kg) in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of the LPLF (p.o.) and indomethacin (i.p.) given, against the early phase (0–5 min, panel (a)) or late phase (15–30 min, panel (b)) of formalin-induced nociception in mice. Each column represents the mean ± S.E.M. of 10 animals. Column C indicates the control values (animals injected with saline, 10 mL/kg) and the asterisks denote the significance levels in comparison with control groups, *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, ***P < 0.001, compared to control group, Tukey's multiple comparison test.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016940&req=5

fig4: Effect of the LPLF (p.o.) and indomethacin (i.p.) given, against the early phase (0–5 min, panel (a)) or late phase (15–30 min, panel (b)) of formalin-induced nociception in mice. Each column represents the mean ± S.E.M. of 10 animals. Column C indicates the control values (animals injected with saline, 10 mL/kg) and the asterisks denote the significance levels in comparison with control groups, *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, ***P < 0.001, compared to control group, Tukey's multiple comparison test.

Mentions: LPLF could cause pain inhibition mainly by two neuronal pain mechanisms: central and peripheral. To investigate the analgesic effect in these different pain types, formalin was injected in the plantar left paw of pretreated mice and the time that they spent licking was counted. The maximal inhibition obtained in the early phase was 74 ± 2% and in the late phase 100%, while indomethacin caused significant inhibition (76 ± 7%) in the late phase (Figure 4). The calculated mean ID50 value for the early phase was 5.67 mg/kg and the late phase was 0.02 mg/kg; these data indicate that LPLF acts on both neurogenic and inflammatory pain.


Libidibia ferrea mature seeds promote antinociceptive effect by peripheral and central pathway: possible involvement of opioid and cholinergic receptors.

Sawada LA, Monteiro VS, Rabelo GR, Dias GB, Da Cunha M, do Nascimento JL, Bastos Gde N - Biomed Res Int (2014)

Effect of the LPLF (p.o.) and indomethacin (i.p.) given, against the early phase (0–5 min, panel (a)) or late phase (15–30 min, panel (b)) of formalin-induced nociception in mice. Each column represents the mean ± S.E.M. of 10 animals. Column C indicates the control values (animals injected with saline, 10 mL/kg) and the asterisks denote the significance levels in comparison with control groups, *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, ***P < 0.001, compared to control group, Tukey's multiple comparison test.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016940&req=5

fig4: Effect of the LPLF (p.o.) and indomethacin (i.p.) given, against the early phase (0–5 min, panel (a)) or late phase (15–30 min, panel (b)) of formalin-induced nociception in mice. Each column represents the mean ± S.E.M. of 10 animals. Column C indicates the control values (animals injected with saline, 10 mL/kg) and the asterisks denote the significance levels in comparison with control groups, *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, ***P < 0.001, compared to control group, Tukey's multiple comparison test.
Mentions: LPLF could cause pain inhibition mainly by two neuronal pain mechanisms: central and peripheral. To investigate the analgesic effect in these different pain types, formalin was injected in the plantar left paw of pretreated mice and the time that they spent licking was counted. The maximal inhibition obtained in the early phase was 74 ± 2% and in the late phase 100%, while indomethacin caused significant inhibition (76 ± 7%) in the late phase (Figure 4). The calculated mean ID50 value for the early phase was 5.67 mg/kg and the late phase was 0.02 mg/kg; these data indicate that LPLF acts on both neurogenic and inflammatory pain.

Bottom Line: We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF), partially elucidating their mechanisms.LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties.Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Neuroquímica Molecular e Celular, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA), Rua Augusto Correa s/n, Guamá, 66075-900 Belém, PA, Brazil ; Laboratório de Neuroinflamação, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA), Rua Augusto Correa s/n, Guamá, 66075-900 Belém, PA, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Libidibia ferrea (LF) is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF), partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg), naloxone (5 mg/kg) in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus