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Importance of Diversity in the Oral Microbiota including Candida Species Revealed by High-Throughput Technologies.

Cho T, Nagao J, Imayoshi R, Tanaka Y - Int J Dent (2014)

Bottom Line: Candida species are well known as components of the commensal oral microbiota.Candida species frequently colonize and develop biofilms on medical devices like dentures and catheters.Therefore, Candida biofilm on dentures leads to a decrease in the bacterial diversity and then to a change in the composition of the oral microbiota.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Infection Biology, Department of Functional Bioscience, Fukuoka Dental College, 2-15-1 Tamura, Sawara-ku, Fukuoka 814-0193, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Taking advantage of high-throughput technologies, deep sequencing of the human microbiome has revealed commensal bacteria independent of the ability to culture them. The composition of the commensal microbiome is dependent on bacterial diversity and the state of the host regulated by the immune system. Candida species are well known as components of the commensal oral microbiota. Candida species frequently colonize and develop biofilms on medical devices like dentures and catheters. Therefore, Candida biofilm on dentures leads to a decrease in the bacterial diversity and then to a change in the composition of the oral microbiota. A disturbance in the balance between commensal bacteria and the host immune system results in a switch from a healthy state to a diseased state even in the limited oral niche.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The microbiota and diseases described in the literature are cited in this review. The white background represents oral bacteria from generally healthy subjects. The dark grey background represents oral bacteria from HIV-positive subjects. The circle of Candida spp. represents detection of Candida spp. from oral bacteria in subjects. The light gray circle of candidiasis represents subjects with candidiasis. The gray circle of periodontitis represents subjects with periodontitis. Numbers in squares represent number of references cited in the text.
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fig1: The microbiota and diseases described in the literature are cited in this review. The white background represents oral bacteria from generally healthy subjects. The dark grey background represents oral bacteria from HIV-positive subjects. The circle of Candida spp. represents detection of Candida spp. from oral bacteria in subjects. The light gray circle of candidiasis represents subjects with candidiasis. The gray circle of periodontitis represents subjects with periodontitis. Numbers in squares represent number of references cited in the text.

Mentions: The progression of a global aging population has been accompanied by severe problems in oral health because aging induces risk factors like tooth loss, wearing dentures, senescence of tissues, and systemic diseases (diabetes, malignancies, implantations of tissues, etc.), which may disturb the oral homeostasis [1–10]. Candida species, especially Candida albicans, is a normal component of the human flora. However, C. albicans causes oral candidiasis in immunocompromised hosts [11–13]. On the other hand, periodontitis is also induced by a change in the balance between oral bacteria and the host defense mechanisms [14–16]. The role of Candida species in the oral microbiota has not been well studied. Here, as shown in Figure 1, the presence of Candida species and the pathogens of periodontitis in generally healthy subjects is described. Moreover, the microbiology of periodontitis including Candida species in HIV infected patients is described.


Importance of Diversity in the Oral Microbiota including Candida Species Revealed by High-Throughput Technologies.

Cho T, Nagao J, Imayoshi R, Tanaka Y - Int J Dent (2014)

The microbiota and diseases described in the literature are cited in this review. The white background represents oral bacteria from generally healthy subjects. The dark grey background represents oral bacteria from HIV-positive subjects. The circle of Candida spp. represents detection of Candida spp. from oral bacteria in subjects. The light gray circle of candidiasis represents subjects with candidiasis. The gray circle of periodontitis represents subjects with periodontitis. Numbers in squares represent number of references cited in the text.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016938&req=5

fig1: The microbiota and diseases described in the literature are cited in this review. The white background represents oral bacteria from generally healthy subjects. The dark grey background represents oral bacteria from HIV-positive subjects. The circle of Candida spp. represents detection of Candida spp. from oral bacteria in subjects. The light gray circle of candidiasis represents subjects with candidiasis. The gray circle of periodontitis represents subjects with periodontitis. Numbers in squares represent number of references cited in the text.
Mentions: The progression of a global aging population has been accompanied by severe problems in oral health because aging induces risk factors like tooth loss, wearing dentures, senescence of tissues, and systemic diseases (diabetes, malignancies, implantations of tissues, etc.), which may disturb the oral homeostasis [1–10]. Candida species, especially Candida albicans, is a normal component of the human flora. However, C. albicans causes oral candidiasis in immunocompromised hosts [11–13]. On the other hand, periodontitis is also induced by a change in the balance between oral bacteria and the host defense mechanisms [14–16]. The role of Candida species in the oral microbiota has not been well studied. Here, as shown in Figure 1, the presence of Candida species and the pathogens of periodontitis in generally healthy subjects is described. Moreover, the microbiology of periodontitis including Candida species in HIV infected patients is described.

Bottom Line: Candida species are well known as components of the commensal oral microbiota.Candida species frequently colonize and develop biofilms on medical devices like dentures and catheters.Therefore, Candida biofilm on dentures leads to a decrease in the bacterial diversity and then to a change in the composition of the oral microbiota.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Infection Biology, Department of Functional Bioscience, Fukuoka Dental College, 2-15-1 Tamura, Sawara-ku, Fukuoka 814-0193, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Taking advantage of high-throughput technologies, deep sequencing of the human microbiome has revealed commensal bacteria independent of the ability to culture them. The composition of the commensal microbiome is dependent on bacterial diversity and the state of the host regulated by the immune system. Candida species are well known as components of the commensal oral microbiota. Candida species frequently colonize and develop biofilms on medical devices like dentures and catheters. Therefore, Candida biofilm on dentures leads to a decrease in the bacterial diversity and then to a change in the composition of the oral microbiota. A disturbance in the balance between commensal bacteria and the host immune system results in a switch from a healthy state to a diseased state even in the limited oral niche.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus