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Case report: living donor liver transplantation for giant hepatic hemangioma using a right lobe graft without the middle hepatic vein.

Zhong L, Men TY, Yang GD, Gu Y, Chen G, Xing TH, Fan JW, Peng ZH - World J Surg Oncol (2014)

Bottom Line: We successfully operated using a right lobe graft without the middle hepatic vein from a 55-year-old donor.At the long-term follow-up, the patient experienced two acute rejections, which were confirmed by biopsy.However, the patient still survives with good graft function after 50 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Shanghai First People Hospital, Medical School of Shanghai Jiaotong University, 85 Wu Jing Road, 200080 Shanghai, People's Republic of China. zhonglin1@medmail.com.cn.

ABSTRACT
Hepatic hemangioma patients with Kasabach-Merritt syndrome have reportedly been cured by liver transplantation. However, liver transplantation as a potential cure for a stable patient without Kasabach-Merritt syndrome remains debatable. We report the case of a 27-year-old female patient with a giant hepatic hemangioma. The hemangioma measured 50×40×25 cm in size and weighed 15 kg, which is the largest and heaviest hemangioma reported in the literature. The patient showed jaundice, ascites, anemia, and appetite loss; but no disseminated intravascular coagulation was observed through laboratory findings. We successfully operated using a right lobe graft without the middle hepatic vein from a 55-year-old donor. At the long-term follow-up, the patient experienced two acute rejections, which were confirmed by biopsy. However, the patient still survives with good graft function after 50 months.

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Showing the four important indices of the patient. Two acute rejection reactions occurred at 12 months and 17 months, which were confirmed by biopsy. The single arrow indicates the first rejection and the double-arrows indicate the second. The two peaks from the table reflect these two episodes.
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Figure 6: Showing the four important indices of the patient. Two acute rejection reactions occurred at 12 months and 17 months, which were confirmed by biopsy. The single arrow indicates the first rejection and the double-arrows indicate the second. The two peaks from the table reflect these two episodes.

Mentions: There are few long-term reports on the outcome of liver transplantation for a giant hepatic hemangioma. We have continued follow-ups with this patient for 50 months. The graft functions well, without biliary complications or hemangioma recurrence. As described earlier, two occasions of acute rejection were diagnosed and treated successfully (Figure 6).


Case report: living donor liver transplantation for giant hepatic hemangioma using a right lobe graft without the middle hepatic vein.

Zhong L, Men TY, Yang GD, Gu Y, Chen G, Xing TH, Fan JW, Peng ZH - World J Surg Oncol (2014)

Showing the four important indices of the patient. Two acute rejection reactions occurred at 12 months and 17 months, which were confirmed by biopsy. The single arrow indicates the first rejection and the double-arrows indicate the second. The two peaks from the table reflect these two episodes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016776&req=5

Figure 6: Showing the four important indices of the patient. Two acute rejection reactions occurred at 12 months and 17 months, which were confirmed by biopsy. The single arrow indicates the first rejection and the double-arrows indicate the second. The two peaks from the table reflect these two episodes.
Mentions: There are few long-term reports on the outcome of liver transplantation for a giant hepatic hemangioma. We have continued follow-ups with this patient for 50 months. The graft functions well, without biliary complications or hemangioma recurrence. As described earlier, two occasions of acute rejection were diagnosed and treated successfully (Figure 6).

Bottom Line: We successfully operated using a right lobe graft without the middle hepatic vein from a 55-year-old donor.At the long-term follow-up, the patient experienced two acute rejections, which were confirmed by biopsy.However, the patient still survives with good graft function after 50 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of General Surgery, Shanghai First People Hospital, Medical School of Shanghai Jiaotong University, 85 Wu Jing Road, 200080 Shanghai, People's Republic of China. zhonglin1@medmail.com.cn.

ABSTRACT
Hepatic hemangioma patients with Kasabach-Merritt syndrome have reportedly been cured by liver transplantation. However, liver transplantation as a potential cure for a stable patient without Kasabach-Merritt syndrome remains debatable. We report the case of a 27-year-old female patient with a giant hepatic hemangioma. The hemangioma measured 50×40×25 cm in size and weighed 15 kg, which is the largest and heaviest hemangioma reported in the literature. The patient showed jaundice, ascites, anemia, and appetite loss; but no disseminated intravascular coagulation was observed through laboratory findings. We successfully operated using a right lobe graft without the middle hepatic vein from a 55-year-old donor. At the long-term follow-up, the patient experienced two acute rejections, which were confirmed by biopsy. However, the patient still survives with good graft function after 50 months.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus