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Developmental mapping of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel expression in the rat nervous system.

Gymnopoulos M, Cingolani LA, Pedarzani P, Stocker M - J. Comp. Neurol. (2014)

Bottom Line: The three SK channel subunits display different developmental expression gradients in distinct CNS regions, with time points of expression and up- or downregulation that can be associated with a range of diverse developmental events.Their early expression in embryonic development suggests an involvement of SK channels in the regulation of developmental processes.Additionally, this study shows how the postnatal ontogenetic patterns lead to the adult expression map for each SK channel subunit and how their coexpression in the same regions or neurons varies throughout development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Biology of Neuronal Signals, Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine, 37075, Göttingen, Germany.

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Expression of SK1, SK2, and SK3 in the embryonic differentiating cerebellum and precerebellar nuclei. SK1 displays a diffuse expression pattern in the cerebellar differentiating field (Cb) at E15 (A) and E17 (D), with strong expression predominantly in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DN) at E19 (G) and E21 (J). SK2 is expressed more strongly than SK1 in the cerebellar differentiating field at E15 (B) and E17 (E). Its strongest expression is subsequently observed in the differentiating Purkinje cell layer (Pk) at E19 (H) and E21 (K). SK3 shows an overall weak and diffuse expression in the cerebellar differentiating field from E15 (C) to E21 (L), in contrast to strong expression in the precerebellar (C,F) and cochlear (I,L) neuroepithelia. For abbreviations see list. For details on the distribution see Tables3. Scale bars = 400 μm in L (applies to D–J,L); 800 μm for A,B,C,K.
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fig13: Expression of SK1, SK2, and SK3 in the embryonic differentiating cerebellum and precerebellar nuclei. SK1 displays a diffuse expression pattern in the cerebellar differentiating field (Cb) at E15 (A) and E17 (D), with strong expression predominantly in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DN) at E19 (G) and E21 (J). SK2 is expressed more strongly than SK1 in the cerebellar differentiating field at E15 (B) and E17 (E). Its strongest expression is subsequently observed in the differentiating Purkinje cell layer (Pk) at E19 (H) and E21 (K). SK3 shows an overall weak and diffuse expression in the cerebellar differentiating field from E15 (C) to E21 (L), in contrast to strong expression in the precerebellar (C,F) and cochlear (I,L) neuroepithelia. For abbreviations see list. For details on the distribution see Tables3. Scale bars = 400 μm in L (applies to D–J,L); 800 μm for A,B,C,K.

Mentions: In the cranial sensory ganglia, strong signals for SK1 and SK2 (Tables1, 2), but not for SK3 (Table3), were observed at E19 (Fig. 13A–C) and E21 (Fig. 13J,K left) in the inferior ganglion of the glossopharyngeal nerve, innervating the pharynx, tonsils, tongue, middle ear, auditory tube, and ear canal. In the trigeminal ganglion, all three SK subunits were observed at E15 (Fig. 12J–L) and E17 (Fig. 2M–O, Tables3). SK1 displayed strong expression (Fig. 2J,M). At E19 and E21, SK1 expression persists (Fig. 13A, Table1) and SK2 levels increase (Fig. 13B, Table2), but SK3 shows a pronounced decline in expression (Fig. 3C, Table1).


Developmental mapping of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel expression in the rat nervous system.

Gymnopoulos M, Cingolani LA, Pedarzani P, Stocker M - J. Comp. Neurol. (2014)

Expression of SK1, SK2, and SK3 in the embryonic differentiating cerebellum and precerebellar nuclei. SK1 displays a diffuse expression pattern in the cerebellar differentiating field (Cb) at E15 (A) and E17 (D), with strong expression predominantly in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DN) at E19 (G) and E21 (J). SK2 is expressed more strongly than SK1 in the cerebellar differentiating field at E15 (B) and E17 (E). Its strongest expression is subsequently observed in the differentiating Purkinje cell layer (Pk) at E19 (H) and E21 (K). SK3 shows an overall weak and diffuse expression in the cerebellar differentiating field from E15 (C) to E21 (L), in contrast to strong expression in the precerebellar (C,F) and cochlear (I,L) neuroepithelia. For abbreviations see list. For details on the distribution see Tables3. Scale bars = 400 μm in L (applies to D–J,L); 800 μm for A,B,C,K.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016743&req=5

fig13: Expression of SK1, SK2, and SK3 in the embryonic differentiating cerebellum and precerebellar nuclei. SK1 displays a diffuse expression pattern in the cerebellar differentiating field (Cb) at E15 (A) and E17 (D), with strong expression predominantly in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DN) at E19 (G) and E21 (J). SK2 is expressed more strongly than SK1 in the cerebellar differentiating field at E15 (B) and E17 (E). Its strongest expression is subsequently observed in the differentiating Purkinje cell layer (Pk) at E19 (H) and E21 (K). SK3 shows an overall weak and diffuse expression in the cerebellar differentiating field from E15 (C) to E21 (L), in contrast to strong expression in the precerebellar (C,F) and cochlear (I,L) neuroepithelia. For abbreviations see list. For details on the distribution see Tables3. Scale bars = 400 μm in L (applies to D–J,L); 800 μm for A,B,C,K.
Mentions: In the cranial sensory ganglia, strong signals for SK1 and SK2 (Tables1, 2), but not for SK3 (Table3), were observed at E19 (Fig. 13A–C) and E21 (Fig. 13J,K left) in the inferior ganglion of the glossopharyngeal nerve, innervating the pharynx, tonsils, tongue, middle ear, auditory tube, and ear canal. In the trigeminal ganglion, all three SK subunits were observed at E15 (Fig. 12J–L) and E17 (Fig. 2M–O, Tables3). SK1 displayed strong expression (Fig. 2J,M). At E19 and E21, SK1 expression persists (Fig. 13A, Table1) and SK2 levels increase (Fig. 13B, Table2), but SK3 shows a pronounced decline in expression (Fig. 3C, Table1).

Bottom Line: The three SK channel subunits display different developmental expression gradients in distinct CNS regions, with time points of expression and up- or downregulation that can be associated with a range of diverse developmental events.Their early expression in embryonic development suggests an involvement of SK channels in the regulation of developmental processes.Additionally, this study shows how the postnatal ontogenetic patterns lead to the adult expression map for each SK channel subunit and how their coexpression in the same regions or neurons varies throughout development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Biology of Neuronal Signals, Max Planck Institute for Experimental Medicine, 37075, Göttingen, Germany.

Show MeSH