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Sensory response following knee joint damage in rabbits.

Hart JM, Bessette M, Choi L, Hogan MV, Diduch D - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2014)

Bottom Line: Two-weeks after the intervention composite afferent signals were recorded from the femoral nerve.Side-to-side ratios (surgical side vs contralateral healthy side) for peak femoral nerve afferent composite signal were used for comparison.Femoral nerve afferent signal ratios were significantly higher in the ACL-R (2.21 ± 0.74) group when compared to the ACL-T (1.28 ± 0.61, P=0.02) group and Control group (1.31 ± 0.78, P=0.03).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. jmh3zf@virginia.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Altered sensory information arising from damaged knee joint structures has been hypothesized as a contributing factor to persistent muscle dysfunction following injury.

Methods: Composite femoral nerve sensory signal was measured in 24 rabbits randomly allocated (8 per group) to receive surgical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) transection with or without autograft reconstruction or nothing (control). Two-weeks after the intervention composite afferent signals were recorded from the femoral nerve. Side-to-side ratios (surgical side vs contralateral healthy side) for peak femoral nerve afferent composite signal were used for comparison.

Results: Femoral nerve afferent signal ratios were significantly higher in the ACL-R (2.21 ± 0.74) group when compared to the ACL-T (1.28 ± 0.61, P=0.02) group and Control group (1.31 ± 0.78, P=0.03).

Conclusion: The magnitude of sensory information recorded on the femoral nerve is increased following ACL injury and reconstruction surgery, but not after an isolated ACL injury in rabbits.

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Average side-side ratios for peak afference measured during passive knee joint extension in rabbits. Measurements were recorded 2 weeks after ACL transection (ACL-T), ACL Reconstruction (ACL-R) and in animals with healthy knee joints (control). Error bars represent +/- 1 standard deviation. The asterils (*) indicates a significant difference compared to the other groups.
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Figure 1: Average side-side ratios for peak afference measured during passive knee joint extension in rabbits. Measurements were recorded 2 weeks after ACL transection (ACL-T), ACL Reconstruction (ACL-R) and in animals with healthy knee joints (control). Error bars represent +/- 1 standard deviation. The asterils (*) indicates a significant difference compared to the other groups.

Mentions: The ratio of peak, integrated femoral nerve afference between the involved and uninvolved sides was significantly different among treatment groups (F2,19 = 3.97, P = 0.036). Specifically, the femoral nerve afference ratio was significantly higher in the ACL-R (2.21 ± 0.74) group when compared to the ACL-T (1.28 ± 0.61, P = 0.020) group and Control group (1.31 ± 0.78, P = 0.029). There was no statistically significant difference between the ACL-T group and control group (P = 0.94, Figure 1). Peak nerve recording values are reported bilaterally with side-side ratios in Table 1.


Sensory response following knee joint damage in rabbits.

Hart JM, Bessette M, Choi L, Hogan MV, Diduch D - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2014)

Average side-side ratios for peak afference measured during passive knee joint extension in rabbits. Measurements were recorded 2 weeks after ACL transection (ACL-T), ACL Reconstruction (ACL-R) and in animals with healthy knee joints (control). Error bars represent +/- 1 standard deviation. The asterils (*) indicates a significant difference compared to the other groups.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016734&req=5

Figure 1: Average side-side ratios for peak afference measured during passive knee joint extension in rabbits. Measurements were recorded 2 weeks after ACL transection (ACL-T), ACL Reconstruction (ACL-R) and in animals with healthy knee joints (control). Error bars represent +/- 1 standard deviation. The asterils (*) indicates a significant difference compared to the other groups.
Mentions: The ratio of peak, integrated femoral nerve afference between the involved and uninvolved sides was significantly different among treatment groups (F2,19 = 3.97, P = 0.036). Specifically, the femoral nerve afference ratio was significantly higher in the ACL-R (2.21 ± 0.74) group when compared to the ACL-T (1.28 ± 0.61, P = 0.020) group and Control group (1.31 ± 0.78, P = 0.029). There was no statistically significant difference between the ACL-T group and control group (P = 0.94, Figure 1). Peak nerve recording values are reported bilaterally with side-side ratios in Table 1.

Bottom Line: Two-weeks after the intervention composite afferent signals were recorded from the femoral nerve.Side-to-side ratios (surgical side vs contralateral healthy side) for peak femoral nerve afferent composite signal were used for comparison.Femoral nerve afferent signal ratios were significantly higher in the ACL-R (2.21 ± 0.74) group when compared to the ACL-T (1.28 ± 0.61, P=0.02) group and Control group (1.31 ± 0.78, P=0.03).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Kinesiology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA. jmh3zf@virginia.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Altered sensory information arising from damaged knee joint structures has been hypothesized as a contributing factor to persistent muscle dysfunction following injury.

Methods: Composite femoral nerve sensory signal was measured in 24 rabbits randomly allocated (8 per group) to receive surgical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) transection with or without autograft reconstruction or nothing (control). Two-weeks after the intervention composite afferent signals were recorded from the femoral nerve. Side-to-side ratios (surgical side vs contralateral healthy side) for peak femoral nerve afferent composite signal were used for comparison.

Results: Femoral nerve afferent signal ratios were significantly higher in the ACL-R (2.21 ± 0.74) group when compared to the ACL-T (1.28 ± 0.61, P=0.02) group and Control group (1.31 ± 0.78, P=0.03).

Conclusion: The magnitude of sensory information recorded on the femoral nerve is increased following ACL injury and reconstruction surgery, but not after an isolated ACL injury in rabbits.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus