Limits...
A drug use survey among clients of harm reduction sites across British Columbia, Canada, 2012.

Kuo M, Shamsian A, Tzemis D, Buxton JA - Harm Reduct J (2014)

Bottom Line: Respondents surveyed in or near their region's major centre were more likely to report having used crack cocaine (p < 0.0001) and heroin (p < 0.0001) in the past week as compared to those residing >50 km from the major centre.Participating sites found the survey process acceptable, feasible to administer annually, and useful for responding to client needs.Drug use frequencies differed substantially by region and community proximity to the regional centre, underlining the need for locally collected data to inform service planning.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, 655 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4R4, Canada. margot.kuo@bccdc.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: In British Columbia (BC), understanding of high-risk drug use trends is largely based on survey and cohort study data from two major cities, which may not be representative of persons who use drugs in other regions. Harm reduction stakeholders, representing each of the five geographic health regions in BC, identified a need for data on drug use to inform local and regional harm reduction activities across the province. The aims of this project were to (1) develop a drug use survey that could be feasibly administered at harm reduction (HR) sites across all health regions and (2) assess the data for differences in reported drug use frequencies by region.

Methods: A pilot survey focusing on current drug use was developed with stakeholders and administered among clients at 28 HR supply distribution sites across the province by existing staff and peers. Data were collated and analysed using univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics to assess differences in reported drug use frequencies by geography. A post-survey evaluation was conducted to assess acceptability and feasibility of the survey process for participating sites.

Results: Crack cocaine, heroin, and morphine were the most frequently reported drugs with notable regional differences. Polysubstance use was common among respondents (70%) with one region having 81% polysubstance use. Respondents surveyed in or near their region's major centre were more likely to report having used crack cocaine (p < 0.0001) and heroin (p < 0.0001) in the past week as compared to those residing >50 km from the major centre. Participants accessing services >50 km from the regional centre were more likely to have used morphine (p < 0.0001). There was no difference in powder cocaine use by client/site proximity to the regional centre. Participating sites found the survey process acceptable, feasible to administer annually, and useful for responding to client needs.

Conclusions: The survey was a feasible way for harm reduction sites across BC to obtain drug use data from clients who actively use drugs. Drug use frequencies differed substantially by region and community proximity to the regional centre, underlining the need for locally collected data to inform service planning.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Polysubstance use. Polysubstance use among survey respondents by health region, BC, 2012 (N = 698). Polysubstance use was defined as using ≥2 listed drugs (marijuana and alcohol excluded).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016659&req=5

Figure 6: Polysubstance use. Polysubstance use among survey respondents by health region, BC, 2012 (N = 698). Polysubstance use was defined as using ≥2 listed drugs (marijuana and alcohol excluded).

Mentions: Polysubstance use was common among HR clients surveyed in all health authorities (mean 69.9%; range 64.0%–81.1%) (Figure 6). Vancouver Island had the highest prevalence of polysubstance use (81.1%) and a notably high prevalence of reporting of greater than three substances used in the last 7 days (37.0%). Northern had the second highest prevalence of more than three substances used within last 7 days (27.8%). Among the 304 respondents who reported use of heroin in the prior 7-day period, 84% also used another substance in the same 7-day period: 54% reported use of crack, 31% reported use of methadone, and 24% and 23% reported use of cocaine and morphine, respectively.


A drug use survey among clients of harm reduction sites across British Columbia, Canada, 2012.

Kuo M, Shamsian A, Tzemis D, Buxton JA - Harm Reduct J (2014)

Polysubstance use. Polysubstance use among survey respondents by health region, BC, 2012 (N = 698). Polysubstance use was defined as using ≥2 listed drugs (marijuana and alcohol excluded).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016659&req=5

Figure 6: Polysubstance use. Polysubstance use among survey respondents by health region, BC, 2012 (N = 698). Polysubstance use was defined as using ≥2 listed drugs (marijuana and alcohol excluded).
Mentions: Polysubstance use was common among HR clients surveyed in all health authorities (mean 69.9%; range 64.0%–81.1%) (Figure 6). Vancouver Island had the highest prevalence of polysubstance use (81.1%) and a notably high prevalence of reporting of greater than three substances used in the last 7 days (37.0%). Northern had the second highest prevalence of more than three substances used within last 7 days (27.8%). Among the 304 respondents who reported use of heroin in the prior 7-day period, 84% also used another substance in the same 7-day period: 54% reported use of crack, 31% reported use of methadone, and 24% and 23% reported use of cocaine and morphine, respectively.

Bottom Line: Respondents surveyed in or near their region's major centre were more likely to report having used crack cocaine (p < 0.0001) and heroin (p < 0.0001) in the past week as compared to those residing >50 km from the major centre.Participating sites found the survey process acceptable, feasible to administer annually, and useful for responding to client needs.Drug use frequencies differed substantially by region and community proximity to the regional centre, underlining the need for locally collected data to inform service planning.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, 655 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4R4, Canada. margot.kuo@bccdc.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: In British Columbia (BC), understanding of high-risk drug use trends is largely based on survey and cohort study data from two major cities, which may not be representative of persons who use drugs in other regions. Harm reduction stakeholders, representing each of the five geographic health regions in BC, identified a need for data on drug use to inform local and regional harm reduction activities across the province. The aims of this project were to (1) develop a drug use survey that could be feasibly administered at harm reduction (HR) sites across all health regions and (2) assess the data for differences in reported drug use frequencies by region.

Methods: A pilot survey focusing on current drug use was developed with stakeholders and administered among clients at 28 HR supply distribution sites across the province by existing staff and peers. Data were collated and analysed using univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics to assess differences in reported drug use frequencies by geography. A post-survey evaluation was conducted to assess acceptability and feasibility of the survey process for participating sites.

Results: Crack cocaine, heroin, and morphine were the most frequently reported drugs with notable regional differences. Polysubstance use was common among respondents (70%) with one region having 81% polysubstance use. Respondents surveyed in or near their region's major centre were more likely to report having used crack cocaine (p < 0.0001) and heroin (p < 0.0001) in the past week as compared to those residing >50 km from the major centre. Participants accessing services >50 km from the regional centre were more likely to have used morphine (p < 0.0001). There was no difference in powder cocaine use by client/site proximity to the regional centre. Participating sites found the survey process acceptable, feasible to administer annually, and useful for responding to client needs.

Conclusions: The survey was a feasible way for harm reduction sites across BC to obtain drug use data from clients who actively use drugs. Drug use frequencies differed substantially by region and community proximity to the regional centre, underlining the need for locally collected data to inform service planning.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus