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Encounters with fierce dogs and itchy bedbugs: why my first field work failed.

Svanberg I - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2014)

Bottom Line: This essay, which is the fifth in the series "Recollections, Reflections, and Revelations: Personal Experiences in Ethnobiology", is a personal reminiscence by the researcher on his first field experience in Turkey in the late 1970s, which was a failure from an ethnobiological point of view but a success for a social scientist pursuing Turkic studies.The author later returned to ethnobiology during subsequent fieldwork on the Faroes.

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Affiliation: Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Uppsala University, Box 514, SE-751 20 Uppsala, Sweden. ingvar.svanberg@ucrs.uu.se.

ABSTRACT
This essay, which is the fifth in the series "Recollections, Reflections, and Revelations: Personal Experiences in Ethnobiology", is a personal reminiscence by the researcher on his first field experience in Turkey in the late 1970s, which was a failure from an ethnobiological point of view but a success for a social scientist pursuing Turkic studies. The author later returned to ethnobiology during subsequent fieldwork on the Faroes.

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Karahacılı Yörüks in the summer camp outside Niğde (Photo Ingvar Svanberg).
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Figure 2: Karahacılı Yörüks in the summer camp outside Niğde (Photo Ingvar Svanberg).

Mentions: This particular group of Yörüks also had some contacts with itinerant peddlers, craftsmen and horse traders, categorized as çingeneler (‘Gypsies’), who regularly set up their tents near the Yörük neighbourhood. Such itinerant groups or service nomads were constantly on the move in Anatolia. They made a living as peddlers, brush-makers, sieve-makers, bear-trainers, or horse-traders, combined with harvesting, cotton-picking, plant gathering, etc. [11]. I used to pay visits to these camps during my stay in Niğde, and I once found in a tent a cage with a rock partridge (Alectoris chukar). Thirty years later I used this observation in an essay on the history of aviculture (Figure 2).


Encounters with fierce dogs and itchy bedbugs: why my first field work failed.

Svanberg I - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2014)

Karahacılı Yörüks in the summer camp outside Niğde (Photo Ingvar Svanberg).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016620&req=5

Figure 2: Karahacılı Yörüks in the summer camp outside Niğde (Photo Ingvar Svanberg).
Mentions: This particular group of Yörüks also had some contacts with itinerant peddlers, craftsmen and horse traders, categorized as çingeneler (‘Gypsies’), who regularly set up their tents near the Yörük neighbourhood. Such itinerant groups or service nomads were constantly on the move in Anatolia. They made a living as peddlers, brush-makers, sieve-makers, bear-trainers, or horse-traders, combined with harvesting, cotton-picking, plant gathering, etc. [11]. I used to pay visits to these camps during my stay in Niğde, and I once found in a tent a cage with a rock partridge (Alectoris chukar). Thirty years later I used this observation in an essay on the history of aviculture (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: This essay, which is the fifth in the series "Recollections, Reflections, and Revelations: Personal Experiences in Ethnobiology", is a personal reminiscence by the researcher on his first field experience in Turkey in the late 1970s, which was a failure from an ethnobiological point of view but a success for a social scientist pursuing Turkic studies.The author later returned to ethnobiology during subsequent fieldwork on the Faroes.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Uppsala Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Uppsala University, Box 514, SE-751 20 Uppsala, Sweden. ingvar.svanberg@ucrs.uu.se.

ABSTRACT
This essay, which is the fifth in the series "Recollections, Reflections, and Revelations: Personal Experiences in Ethnobiology", is a personal reminiscence by the researcher on his first field experience in Turkey in the late 1970s, which was a failure from an ethnobiological point of view but a success for a social scientist pursuing Turkic studies. The author later returned to ethnobiology during subsequent fieldwork on the Faroes.

Show MeSH