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Imaging in anatomy: a comparison of imaging techniques in embalmed human cadavers.

Schramek GG, Stoevesandt D, Reising A, Kielstein JT, Hiss M, Kielstein H - BMC Med Educ (2013)

Bottom Line: Four different imaging techniques (ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) were performed in embalmed human body donors to analyse possibilities and limitations of the respective techniques in this peculiar setting.The quality of ultrasound and radiography images was poor, images of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were of good quality.Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have a superior image quality in comparison to ultrasound and radiography and offer suitable methods for imaging embalmed human cadavers as a valuable addition to the dissection course.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Magdeburger Str, 8, 06108 Halle (Saale), Germany. ruth.schramek@medizin.uni-halle.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: A large variety of imaging techniques is an integral part of modern medicine. Introducing radiological imaging techniques into the dissection course serves as a basis for improved learning of anatomy and multidisciplinary learning in pre-clinical medical education.

Methods: Four different imaging techniques (ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) were performed in embalmed human body donors to analyse possibilities and limitations of the respective techniques in this peculiar setting.

Results: The quality of ultrasound and radiography images was poor, images of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were of good quality.

Conclusion: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have a superior image quality in comparison to ultrasound and radiography and offer suitable methods for imaging embalmed human cadavers as a valuable addition to the dissection course.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Very poor quality of ultrasound image of the kidney. The evaluation of reliable measurements of the kidney was unsuccessful due to severe gas artifacts.
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Figure 1: Very poor quality of ultrasound image of the kidney. The evaluation of reliable measurements of the kidney was unsuccessful due to severe gas artifacts.

Mentions: The imaging quality of the examined kidneys was very poor (Figure 1). Although offering a non-invasive technique, severe intravascular gas artifacts, up to the small renal blood vessels (arcuate arteries) and in the surrounding tissue, were found (Additional file 1). Furthermore, in supine position some cadavers showed laminar subepidermal accumulations of gas. Tissue compression with the ultrasound transducer did not improve the imaging. The evaluation of reliable measurements of the kidneys was predominantly unsuccessful (Table 1).


Imaging in anatomy: a comparison of imaging techniques in embalmed human cadavers.

Schramek GG, Stoevesandt D, Reising A, Kielstein JT, Hiss M, Kielstein H - BMC Med Educ (2013)

Very poor quality of ultrasound image of the kidney. The evaluation of reliable measurements of the kidney was unsuccessful due to severe gas artifacts.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016606&req=5

Figure 1: Very poor quality of ultrasound image of the kidney. The evaluation of reliable measurements of the kidney was unsuccessful due to severe gas artifacts.
Mentions: The imaging quality of the examined kidneys was very poor (Figure 1). Although offering a non-invasive technique, severe intravascular gas artifacts, up to the small renal blood vessels (arcuate arteries) and in the surrounding tissue, were found (Additional file 1). Furthermore, in supine position some cadavers showed laminar subepidermal accumulations of gas. Tissue compression with the ultrasound transducer did not improve the imaging. The evaluation of reliable measurements of the kidneys was predominantly unsuccessful (Table 1).

Bottom Line: Four different imaging techniques (ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) were performed in embalmed human body donors to analyse possibilities and limitations of the respective techniques in this peculiar setting.The quality of ultrasound and radiography images was poor, images of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were of good quality.Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have a superior image quality in comparison to ultrasound and radiography and offer suitable methods for imaging embalmed human cadavers as a valuable addition to the dissection course.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Magdeburger Str, 8, 06108 Halle (Saale), Germany. ruth.schramek@medizin.uni-halle.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: A large variety of imaging techniques is an integral part of modern medicine. Introducing radiological imaging techniques into the dissection course serves as a basis for improved learning of anatomy and multidisciplinary learning in pre-clinical medical education.

Methods: Four different imaging techniques (ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) were performed in embalmed human body donors to analyse possibilities and limitations of the respective techniques in this peculiar setting.

Results: The quality of ultrasound and radiography images was poor, images of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were of good quality.

Conclusion: Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have a superior image quality in comparison to ultrasound and radiography and offer suitable methods for imaging embalmed human cadavers as a valuable addition to the dissection course.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus