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A phylogeny for the pomatiopsidae (Gastropoda: Rissooidea): a resource for taxonomic, parasitological and biodiversity studies.

Liu L, Huo GN, He HB, Zhou B, Attwood SW - BMC Evol. Biol. (2014)

Bottom Line: Consequently, the aim of the study was to collect DNA-sequence data for as many pomatiopsid taxa as possible, as a first step in providing a resource for identification of epidemiologically significant species (by non-malacologists), for use in resolving taxonomic confusion and for testing phylogeographical hypotheses.The molecular dates and phylogenetic estimates in this study are consistent with an Australasian origin for the Pomatiopsidae and an East to West radiation via Oligocene Borneo-Philippines island hopping to Japan and then China (Triculinae arising mid-Miocene in Southeast China), and less so with a triculine origin in Tibet.The lack of monophyly in the medically important genera and indications of taxonomic inaccuracies, call for further work to identify epidemiologically significant taxa (e.g., Halewisia may be potential hosts for Schistosoma mekongi) and highlight the need for surveys to determine the true biodiversity of the Triculinae.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, 1 KeYuan 4 Lu, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, People's Republic of China. swahuaxi@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The Pomatiopsidae are reported from northern India into southern China and Southeast Asia, with two sub-families, the Pomatiopsinae (which include freshwater, amphibious, terrestrial and marine species) and the freshwater Triculinae. Both include species acting as intermediate host for species of the blood-fluke Schistosoma which cause a public health problem in East Asia. Also, with around 120 species, triculine biodiversity exceeds that of any other endemic freshwater molluscan fauna. Nevertheless, the origins of the Pomatiopsidae, the factors driving such a diverse radiation and aspects of their co-evolution with Schistosoma are not fully understood. Many taxonomic questions remain; there are problems identifying medically relevant species. The predicted range is mostly unsurveyed and the true biodiversity of the family is underestimated. Consequently, the aim of the study was to collect DNA-sequence data for as many pomatiopsid taxa as possible, as a first step in providing a resource for identification of epidemiologically significant species (by non-malacologists), for use in resolving taxonomic confusion and for testing phylogeographical hypotheses.

Results: The evolutionary radiation of the Triculinae was shown to have been rapid and mostly post late Miocene. Molecular dating indicated that the radiation of these snails was driven first by the uplift of the Himalaya and onset of a monsoon system, and then by late-Pliocene global warming. The status of Erhaia as Anmicolidae is supported. The genera Tricula and Neotricula are shown to be non-monophyletic and the tribe Jullieniini may be polyphyletic (based on convergent characters). Triculinae from northern Vietnam could be derived from Gammatricula of Fujian/Yunnan, China.

Conclusions: The molecular dates and phylogenetic estimates in this study are consistent with an Australasian origin for the Pomatiopsidae and an East to West radiation via Oligocene Borneo-Philippines island hopping to Japan and then China (Triculinae arising mid-Miocene in Southeast China), and less so with a triculine origin in Tibet. The lack of monophyly in the medically important genera and indications of taxonomic inaccuracies, call for further work to identify epidemiologically significant taxa (e.g., Halewisia may be potential hosts for Schistosoma mekongi) and highlight the need for surveys to determine the true biodiversity of the Triculinae.

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Sampling localities for the present study. Map to show the collecting localities or origin of taxa (in the case of data from the GenBank) used in the present study. Coloured spots indicate the samples for each main taxonomic group: Erhaiini, blue; Jullieniini, purple; Pachydrobiini, green; Pomatiopsinae, red; Triculini, yellow. Map generated using the R packages maps and mapdata [6,7] and the data in Table 5.
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Figure 8: Sampling localities for the present study. Map to show the collecting localities or origin of taxa (in the case of data from the GenBank) used in the present study. Coloured spots indicate the samples for each main taxonomic group: Erhaiini, blue; Jullieniini, purple; Pachydrobiini, green; Pomatiopsinae, red; Triculini, yellow. Map generated using the R packages maps and mapdata [6,7] and the data in Table 5.

Mentions: The field sampling covered 4 countries, 3 provinces of China, 9 river/drainage systems and 11 genera, with DNA for 6 genera (16 species) sequenced for the first time, and 21 species sequenced for the first time at the loci sampled (Figure 8). Additional data sourced from the GenBank extended the study to include 38 taxa, encompassing 17 genera from 9 countries and 19 drainage systems. Table 5 gives details of taxa sampled, Genbank accession numbers and collection localities for all sources of sequence data. All field collected specimens were identified by general shell form, radular characters, ecological habit, examination of head-foot and operculum, and by gross dissection of pallial and reproductive structures, with reference to detailed published descriptions [8,10,13-15,21,59,104-106,110-115]. Samples for DNA extraction were fixed in the field directly in 100% ethanol, with a sub sample of each taxon fixed in 10% neutral formalin for morphological study.


A phylogeny for the pomatiopsidae (Gastropoda: Rissooidea): a resource for taxonomic, parasitological and biodiversity studies.

Liu L, Huo GN, He HB, Zhou B, Attwood SW - BMC Evol. Biol. (2014)

Sampling localities for the present study. Map to show the collecting localities or origin of taxa (in the case of data from the GenBank) used in the present study. Coloured spots indicate the samples for each main taxonomic group: Erhaiini, blue; Jullieniini, purple; Pachydrobiini, green; Pomatiopsinae, red; Triculini, yellow. Map generated using the R packages maps and mapdata [6,7] and the data in Table 5.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016560&req=5

Figure 8: Sampling localities for the present study. Map to show the collecting localities or origin of taxa (in the case of data from the GenBank) used in the present study. Coloured spots indicate the samples for each main taxonomic group: Erhaiini, blue; Jullieniini, purple; Pachydrobiini, green; Pomatiopsinae, red; Triculini, yellow. Map generated using the R packages maps and mapdata [6,7] and the data in Table 5.
Mentions: The field sampling covered 4 countries, 3 provinces of China, 9 river/drainage systems and 11 genera, with DNA for 6 genera (16 species) sequenced for the first time, and 21 species sequenced for the first time at the loci sampled (Figure 8). Additional data sourced from the GenBank extended the study to include 38 taxa, encompassing 17 genera from 9 countries and 19 drainage systems. Table 5 gives details of taxa sampled, Genbank accession numbers and collection localities for all sources of sequence data. All field collected specimens were identified by general shell form, radular characters, ecological habit, examination of head-foot and operculum, and by gross dissection of pallial and reproductive structures, with reference to detailed published descriptions [8,10,13-15,21,59,104-106,110-115]. Samples for DNA extraction were fixed in the field directly in 100% ethanol, with a sub sample of each taxon fixed in 10% neutral formalin for morphological study.

Bottom Line: Consequently, the aim of the study was to collect DNA-sequence data for as many pomatiopsid taxa as possible, as a first step in providing a resource for identification of epidemiologically significant species (by non-malacologists), for use in resolving taxonomic confusion and for testing phylogeographical hypotheses.The molecular dates and phylogenetic estimates in this study are consistent with an Australasian origin for the Pomatiopsidae and an East to West radiation via Oligocene Borneo-Philippines island hopping to Japan and then China (Triculinae arising mid-Miocene in Southeast China), and less so with a triculine origin in Tibet.The lack of monophyly in the medically important genera and indications of taxonomic inaccuracies, call for further work to identify epidemiologically significant taxa (e.g., Halewisia may be potential hosts for Schistosoma mekongi) and highlight the need for surveys to determine the true biodiversity of the Triculinae.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, 1 KeYuan 4 Lu, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, People's Republic of China. swahuaxi@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The Pomatiopsidae are reported from northern India into southern China and Southeast Asia, with two sub-families, the Pomatiopsinae (which include freshwater, amphibious, terrestrial and marine species) and the freshwater Triculinae. Both include species acting as intermediate host for species of the blood-fluke Schistosoma which cause a public health problem in East Asia. Also, with around 120 species, triculine biodiversity exceeds that of any other endemic freshwater molluscan fauna. Nevertheless, the origins of the Pomatiopsidae, the factors driving such a diverse radiation and aspects of their co-evolution with Schistosoma are not fully understood. Many taxonomic questions remain; there are problems identifying medically relevant species. The predicted range is mostly unsurveyed and the true biodiversity of the family is underestimated. Consequently, the aim of the study was to collect DNA-sequence data for as many pomatiopsid taxa as possible, as a first step in providing a resource for identification of epidemiologically significant species (by non-malacologists), for use in resolving taxonomic confusion and for testing phylogeographical hypotheses.

Results: The evolutionary radiation of the Triculinae was shown to have been rapid and mostly post late Miocene. Molecular dating indicated that the radiation of these snails was driven first by the uplift of the Himalaya and onset of a monsoon system, and then by late-Pliocene global warming. The status of Erhaia as Anmicolidae is supported. The genera Tricula and Neotricula are shown to be non-monophyletic and the tribe Jullieniini may be polyphyletic (based on convergent characters). Triculinae from northern Vietnam could be derived from Gammatricula of Fujian/Yunnan, China.

Conclusions: The molecular dates and phylogenetic estimates in this study are consistent with an Australasian origin for the Pomatiopsidae and an East to West radiation via Oligocene Borneo-Philippines island hopping to Japan and then China (Triculinae arising mid-Miocene in Southeast China), and less so with a triculine origin in Tibet. The lack of monophyly in the medically important genera and indications of taxonomic inaccuracies, call for further work to identify epidemiologically significant taxa (e.g., Halewisia may be potential hosts for Schistosoma mekongi) and highlight the need for surveys to determine the true biodiversity of the Triculinae.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus