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Surface coatings of ZnO nanoparticles mitigate differentially a host of transcriptional, protein and signalling responses in primary human olfactory cells.

Osmond-McLeod MJ, Osmond RI, Oytam Y, McCall MJ, Feltis B, Mackay-Sim A, Wood SA, Cook AL - Part Fibre Toxicol (2013)

Bottom Line: Four types of commercially-available zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles, two coated and two uncoated, were examined for their effects on primary human cells cultured from the olfactory mucosa.ZnO nanoparticle toxicity in hONS cells was mediated through a battery of mechanisms largely related to cell stress, inflammatory response and apoptosis, but not activation of mechanisms that repair damaged DNA.Surface coatings on the ZnO nanoparticles mitigated these cellular responses to varying degrees.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: CSIRO Advanced Materials TCP (Nanosafety), and CSIRO Animal, Food and Health Sciences, PO Box 52, North Ryde, NSW 1670, Australia. megan.osmond@csiro.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Inhaled nanoparticles have been reported in some instances to translocate from the nostril to the olfactory bulb in exposed rats. In close proximity to the olfactory bulb is the olfactory mucosa, within which resides a niche of multipotent cells. Cells isolated from this area may provide a relevant in vitro system to investigate potential effects of workplace exposure to inhaled zinc oxide nanoparticles.

Methods: Four types of commercially-available zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles, two coated and two uncoated, were examined for their effects on primary human cells cultured from the olfactory mucosa. Human olfactory neurosphere-derived (hONS) cells from healthy adult donors were analyzed for modulation of cytokine levels, activation of intracellular signalling pathways, changes in gene-expression patterns across the whole genome, and compromised cellular function over a 24 h period following exposure to the nanoparticles suspended in cell culture medium.

Results: ZnO nanoparticle toxicity in hONS cells was mediated through a battery of mechanisms largely related to cell stress, inflammatory response and apoptosis, but not activation of mechanisms that repair damaged DNA. Surface coatings on the ZnO nanoparticles mitigated these cellular responses to varying degrees.

Conclusions: The results indicate that care should be taken in the workplace to minimize generation of, and exposure to, aerosols of uncoated ZnO nanoparticles, given the adverse responses reported here using multipotent cells derived from the olfactory mucosa.

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Changes in cell function in hONS cells treated with ZnO nanoparticles. For each ZnO treatment at each time-point (2 h, 6 h and 24 h), the responses of hONS cells from donors A, B, C and D, each seeded in three replicate wells, were averaged and expressed as the percentage of time-matched untreated cells set as 100%. Data used to generate this figure, and associated standard errors of means and statistical significance, are supplied separately in Additional file 3: Table S2.
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Figure 7: Changes in cell function in hONS cells treated with ZnO nanoparticles. For each ZnO treatment at each time-point (2 h, 6 h and 24 h), the responses of hONS cells from donors A, B, C and D, each seeded in three replicate wells, were averaged and expressed as the percentage of time-matched untreated cells set as 100%. Data used to generate this figure, and associated standard errors of means and statistical significance, are supplied separately in Additional file 3: Table S2.

Mentions: hONS cells from donors A, B, C and D were assessed for viability after exposure to the four ZnO samples for 2, 6 and 24 h, using a range of functional indicators including metabolic activity, antioxidant capacity, proteasome activity, plasma membrane integrity, and apoptosis. Data from the four donors were averaged and the results from all experiments across all time-points are summarised in Figure 7. The data used to generate this figure, together with standard errors of the mean and statistical significance, are supplied separately in Additional file 3: Table S2.


Surface coatings of ZnO nanoparticles mitigate differentially a host of transcriptional, protein and signalling responses in primary human olfactory cells.

Osmond-McLeod MJ, Osmond RI, Oytam Y, McCall MJ, Feltis B, Mackay-Sim A, Wood SA, Cook AL - Part Fibre Toxicol (2013)

Changes in cell function in hONS cells treated with ZnO nanoparticles. For each ZnO treatment at each time-point (2 h, 6 h and 24 h), the responses of hONS cells from donors A, B, C and D, each seeded in three replicate wells, were averaged and expressed as the percentage of time-matched untreated cells set as 100%. Data used to generate this figure, and associated standard errors of means and statistical significance, are supplied separately in Additional file 3: Table S2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016547&req=5

Figure 7: Changes in cell function in hONS cells treated with ZnO nanoparticles. For each ZnO treatment at each time-point (2 h, 6 h and 24 h), the responses of hONS cells from donors A, B, C and D, each seeded in three replicate wells, were averaged and expressed as the percentage of time-matched untreated cells set as 100%. Data used to generate this figure, and associated standard errors of means and statistical significance, are supplied separately in Additional file 3: Table S2.
Mentions: hONS cells from donors A, B, C and D were assessed for viability after exposure to the four ZnO samples for 2, 6 and 24 h, using a range of functional indicators including metabolic activity, antioxidant capacity, proteasome activity, plasma membrane integrity, and apoptosis. Data from the four donors were averaged and the results from all experiments across all time-points are summarised in Figure 7. The data used to generate this figure, together with standard errors of the mean and statistical significance, are supplied separately in Additional file 3: Table S2.

Bottom Line: Four types of commercially-available zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles, two coated and two uncoated, were examined for their effects on primary human cells cultured from the olfactory mucosa.ZnO nanoparticle toxicity in hONS cells was mediated through a battery of mechanisms largely related to cell stress, inflammatory response and apoptosis, but not activation of mechanisms that repair damaged DNA.Surface coatings on the ZnO nanoparticles mitigated these cellular responses to varying degrees.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: CSIRO Advanced Materials TCP (Nanosafety), and CSIRO Animal, Food and Health Sciences, PO Box 52, North Ryde, NSW 1670, Australia. megan.osmond@csiro.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: Inhaled nanoparticles have been reported in some instances to translocate from the nostril to the olfactory bulb in exposed rats. In close proximity to the olfactory bulb is the olfactory mucosa, within which resides a niche of multipotent cells. Cells isolated from this area may provide a relevant in vitro system to investigate potential effects of workplace exposure to inhaled zinc oxide nanoparticles.

Methods: Four types of commercially-available zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles, two coated and two uncoated, were examined for their effects on primary human cells cultured from the olfactory mucosa. Human olfactory neurosphere-derived (hONS) cells from healthy adult donors were analyzed for modulation of cytokine levels, activation of intracellular signalling pathways, changes in gene-expression patterns across the whole genome, and compromised cellular function over a 24 h period following exposure to the nanoparticles suspended in cell culture medium.

Results: ZnO nanoparticle toxicity in hONS cells was mediated through a battery of mechanisms largely related to cell stress, inflammatory response and apoptosis, but not activation of mechanisms that repair damaged DNA. Surface coatings on the ZnO nanoparticles mitigated these cellular responses to varying degrees.

Conclusions: The results indicate that care should be taken in the workplace to minimize generation of, and exposure to, aerosols of uncoated ZnO nanoparticles, given the adverse responses reported here using multipotent cells derived from the olfactory mucosa.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus