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Identification of FISH biomarkers to detect chromosome abnormalities associated with prostate adenocarcinoma in tumour and field effect environment.

Zhang Y, Perez T, Blondin B, Du J, Liu P, Escarzaga D, Coon JS, Morrison LE, Pestova K - BMC Cancer (2014)

Bottom Line: To reduce sampling error associated with cancer detection in prostate needle biopsies, we explored the possibility of using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) to detect chromosomal abnormalities in the histologically benign prostate tissue from patients with adenocarcinoma of prostate.A distribution of FISH signals in the tumour and histologically benign adjacent tissue was compared to that in BPH specimens using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis.The combination of MYC gain, CEP8 Abnormal, PTEN loss or chromosome 7 aneusomy was positive in the tumour area of all of the 33 specimens from patients with adenocarcinomas, and in 88% of adjacent histologically benign regions (15 out of 17) but in only 15% (4 out of 26) of the benign prostatic hyperplasia control specimens.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Abbott Molecular, Inc, 1300 East Touhy Avenue, Des Plaines, IL 60018, USA. ekaterina.pestova@abbott.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: To reduce sampling error associated with cancer detection in prostate needle biopsies, we explored the possibility of using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) to detect chromosomal abnormalities in the histologically benign prostate tissue from patients with adenocarcinoma of prostate.

Methods: Tumour specimens from 33 radical prostatectomy (RP) cases, histologically benign tissue from 17 of the 33 RP cases, and 26 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) control cases were evaluated with Locus Specific Identifier (LSI) probes MYC (8q24), LPL (8p21.22), and PTEN (10q23), as well as with centromere enumerator probes CEP8, CEP10, and CEP7. A distribution of FISH signals in the tumour and histologically benign adjacent tissue was compared to that in BPH specimens using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis.

Results: The combination of MYC gain, CEP8 Abnormal, PTEN loss or chromosome 7 aneusomy was positive in the tumour area of all of the 33 specimens from patients with adenocarcinomas, and in 88% of adjacent histologically benign regions (15 out of 17) but in only 15% (4 out of 26) of the benign prostatic hyperplasia control specimens.

Conclusions: A panel of FISH markers may allow detection of genomic abnormalities that associate with adenocarcinoma in the field adjacent to and surrounding the tumour, and thus could potentially indicate the presence of cancer in the specimen even if the cancer focus itself was missed by biopsy and histology review.

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Representative images of FISH and H&E staining from tumour and histologically benign areas of the same case. A: an H&E image of a tumour section (from Case 01, tumour block) with the area of tumour circled; B: MYC amplification (green signals indicated by the red arrow) and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the tumour section; C: PTEN deletion indicated by green arrows and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the tumour section (gold PTEN signals are visible only in stroma cells); D: an H&E image of the histologically benign section (from Case 01, histologically benign block) with the area that has abnormal FISH signals circled; E: MYC amplification (green signals indicated by the red arrow) and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the histologically benign section; F: PTEN deletion indicated by green arrows and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the histologically benign section (gold PTEN signals are visible only in stroma cells, indicated by white arrows).
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Figure 2: Representative images of FISH and H&E staining from tumour and histologically benign areas of the same case. A: an H&E image of a tumour section (from Case 01, tumour block) with the area of tumour circled; B: MYC amplification (green signals indicated by the red arrow) and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the tumour section; C: PTEN deletion indicated by green arrows and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the tumour section (gold PTEN signals are visible only in stroma cells); D: an H&E image of the histologically benign section (from Case 01, histologically benign block) with the area that has abnormal FISH signals circled; E: MYC amplification (green signals indicated by the red arrow) and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the histologically benign section; F: PTEN deletion indicated by green arrows and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the histologically benign section (gold PTEN signals are visible only in stroma cells, indicated by white arrows).

Mentions: Representative images demonstrating FISH and H&E staining from a tumour section (Figure 2A, 2B, and 2C) and a histologically benign section (Figure 2D, 2E, and 2F) of the same case are shown in Figure 2. Figure 2A presents an H&E image of a tumour section (from Case 01, tumour block) with the area of the tumour circled. Figure 2D shows an H&E image of the histologically benign section (from Case 01, histologically benign block) with the area that had abnormal FISH signals circled. Figure 2B and 2C show abnormal FISH in a representative field of view of the tumour section. Figure 2E and 2F show abnormal FISH from a representative field of view of the histologically benign section. Figure 2B and 2E show MYC amplification (green signals indicated by the red arrow) and DAPI nuclear staining (blue), while Figure 2C and 2F show PTEN deletion indicated by green arrows (gold PTEN signals are visible only in stroma cells, indicated by white arrows) and DAPI nuclear staining (blue).


Identification of FISH biomarkers to detect chromosome abnormalities associated with prostate adenocarcinoma in tumour and field effect environment.

Zhang Y, Perez T, Blondin B, Du J, Liu P, Escarzaga D, Coon JS, Morrison LE, Pestova K - BMC Cancer (2014)

Representative images of FISH and H&E staining from tumour and histologically benign areas of the same case. A: an H&E image of a tumour section (from Case 01, tumour block) with the area of tumour circled; B: MYC amplification (green signals indicated by the red arrow) and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the tumour section; C: PTEN deletion indicated by green arrows and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the tumour section (gold PTEN signals are visible only in stroma cells); D: an H&E image of the histologically benign section (from Case 01, histologically benign block) with the area that has abnormal FISH signals circled; E: MYC amplification (green signals indicated by the red arrow) and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the histologically benign section; F: PTEN deletion indicated by green arrows and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the histologically benign section (gold PTEN signals are visible only in stroma cells, indicated by white arrows).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016502&req=5

Figure 2: Representative images of FISH and H&E staining from tumour and histologically benign areas of the same case. A: an H&E image of a tumour section (from Case 01, tumour block) with the area of tumour circled; B: MYC amplification (green signals indicated by the red arrow) and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the tumour section; C: PTEN deletion indicated by green arrows and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the tumour section (gold PTEN signals are visible only in stroma cells); D: an H&E image of the histologically benign section (from Case 01, histologically benign block) with the area that has abnormal FISH signals circled; E: MYC amplification (green signals indicated by the red arrow) and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the histologically benign section; F: PTEN deletion indicated by green arrows and DAPI nuclear staining (blue) in a representative field of view of the histologically benign section (gold PTEN signals are visible only in stroma cells, indicated by white arrows).
Mentions: Representative images demonstrating FISH and H&E staining from a tumour section (Figure 2A, 2B, and 2C) and a histologically benign section (Figure 2D, 2E, and 2F) of the same case are shown in Figure 2. Figure 2A presents an H&E image of a tumour section (from Case 01, tumour block) with the area of the tumour circled. Figure 2D shows an H&E image of the histologically benign section (from Case 01, histologically benign block) with the area that had abnormal FISH signals circled. Figure 2B and 2C show abnormal FISH in a representative field of view of the tumour section. Figure 2E and 2F show abnormal FISH from a representative field of view of the histologically benign section. Figure 2B and 2E show MYC amplification (green signals indicated by the red arrow) and DAPI nuclear staining (blue), while Figure 2C and 2F show PTEN deletion indicated by green arrows (gold PTEN signals are visible only in stroma cells, indicated by white arrows) and DAPI nuclear staining (blue).

Bottom Line: To reduce sampling error associated with cancer detection in prostate needle biopsies, we explored the possibility of using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) to detect chromosomal abnormalities in the histologically benign prostate tissue from patients with adenocarcinoma of prostate.A distribution of FISH signals in the tumour and histologically benign adjacent tissue was compared to that in BPH specimens using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis.The combination of MYC gain, CEP8 Abnormal, PTEN loss or chromosome 7 aneusomy was positive in the tumour area of all of the 33 specimens from patients with adenocarcinomas, and in 88% of adjacent histologically benign regions (15 out of 17) but in only 15% (4 out of 26) of the benign prostatic hyperplasia control specimens.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Abbott Molecular, Inc, 1300 East Touhy Avenue, Des Plaines, IL 60018, USA. ekaterina.pestova@abbott.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: To reduce sampling error associated with cancer detection in prostate needle biopsies, we explored the possibility of using fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) to detect chromosomal abnormalities in the histologically benign prostate tissue from patients with adenocarcinoma of prostate.

Methods: Tumour specimens from 33 radical prostatectomy (RP) cases, histologically benign tissue from 17 of the 33 RP cases, and 26 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) control cases were evaluated with Locus Specific Identifier (LSI) probes MYC (8q24), LPL (8p21.22), and PTEN (10q23), as well as with centromere enumerator probes CEP8, CEP10, and CEP7. A distribution of FISH signals in the tumour and histologically benign adjacent tissue was compared to that in BPH specimens using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis.

Results: The combination of MYC gain, CEP8 Abnormal, PTEN loss or chromosome 7 aneusomy was positive in the tumour area of all of the 33 specimens from patients with adenocarcinomas, and in 88% of adjacent histologically benign regions (15 out of 17) but in only 15% (4 out of 26) of the benign prostatic hyperplasia control specimens.

Conclusions: A panel of FISH markers may allow detection of genomic abnormalities that associate with adenocarcinoma in the field adjacent to and surrounding the tumour, and thus could potentially indicate the presence of cancer in the specimen even if the cancer focus itself was missed by biopsy and histology review.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus