Limits...
Processed foods available in the Pacific Islands.

Snowdon W, Raj A, Reeve E, Guerrero R, Fesaitu J, Cateine K, Guignet C - Global Health (2013)

Bottom Line: Inaccurate labels were found on 132 products.The globalisation of the food supply is having considerable impacts on diets in the Pacific Islands.While nutrient labels can be informative for consumers looking for healthier options, difficulties still exist with poor labelling and interpretation can be challenging.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: C-POND, Fiji National University and Deakin University, C/O College of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences, FNU (Tamavua Campus), Private Mail Bag, Suva, Fiji. wendy.snowdon@deakin.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is an increasing reliance on processed foods globally, yet food composition tables include minimal information on their nutrient content. The Pacific Islands share common trade links and are heavily reliant on imported foods. The objective was to develop a dataset for the Pacific Islands on nutrient composition of processed foods sold and their sources.

Methods: Information on the food labels, including country of origin, nutrient content and promotional claims were recorded into a standardised dataset. Data were cleaned, converted to per 100 g data as needed and then checked for anomalies and recording errors.

Setting: Five representative countries were selected for data collection, based on their trading patterns: Fiji, Guam, Nauru, New Caledonia, and Samoa. Data were collected in the capitals, in larger stores which import their own foods.

Subjects: Processed foods in stores.

Results: The data from 6041 foods and drinks were recorded. Fifty four countries of origin were identified, with the main provider of food for each Pacific Island country being that with which it was most strongly linked politically. Nutrient data were not provided for 6% of the foods, imported from various countries. Inaccurate labels were found on 132 products. Over one-quarter of the foods included some nutrient or health-related claims.

Conclusions: The globalisation of the food supply is having considerable impacts on diets in the Pacific Islands. While nutrient labels can be informative for consumers looking for healthier options, difficulties still exist with poor labelling and interpretation can be challenging.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of items from key food sub-categories in the region.
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Figure 2: Number of items from key food sub-categories in the region.

Mentions: In some product categories there were a considerable number of different products available. For example, with soft drinks (defined as sugar-sweetened or artificially sweetened non-alcoholic beverages), 83 varieties were available in New Caledonia, but only 27 in Samoa. In the snack food category which included crisps, extruded snacks and corn chips, Fiji had over 150 products, while Nauru had just 9 products. FigureĀ 2 shows a selection of the food categories, and indicates that sauces, biscuits and snack foods had the largest variety at a regional level. Processed fish consisted mostly of canned fish, and it is a popular item in the region.


Processed foods available in the Pacific Islands.

Snowdon W, Raj A, Reeve E, Guerrero R, Fesaitu J, Cateine K, Guignet C - Global Health (2013)

Number of items from key food sub-categories in the region.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016479&req=5

Figure 2: Number of items from key food sub-categories in the region.
Mentions: In some product categories there were a considerable number of different products available. For example, with soft drinks (defined as sugar-sweetened or artificially sweetened non-alcoholic beverages), 83 varieties were available in New Caledonia, but only 27 in Samoa. In the snack food category which included crisps, extruded snacks and corn chips, Fiji had over 150 products, while Nauru had just 9 products. FigureĀ 2 shows a selection of the food categories, and indicates that sauces, biscuits and snack foods had the largest variety at a regional level. Processed fish consisted mostly of canned fish, and it is a popular item in the region.

Bottom Line: Inaccurate labels were found on 132 products.The globalisation of the food supply is having considerable impacts on diets in the Pacific Islands.While nutrient labels can be informative for consumers looking for healthier options, difficulties still exist with poor labelling and interpretation can be challenging.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: C-POND, Fiji National University and Deakin University, C/O College of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences, FNU (Tamavua Campus), Private Mail Bag, Suva, Fiji. wendy.snowdon@deakin.edu.au.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is an increasing reliance on processed foods globally, yet food composition tables include minimal information on their nutrient content. The Pacific Islands share common trade links and are heavily reliant on imported foods. The objective was to develop a dataset for the Pacific Islands on nutrient composition of processed foods sold and their sources.

Methods: Information on the food labels, including country of origin, nutrient content and promotional claims were recorded into a standardised dataset. Data were cleaned, converted to per 100 g data as needed and then checked for anomalies and recording errors.

Setting: Five representative countries were selected for data collection, based on their trading patterns: Fiji, Guam, Nauru, New Caledonia, and Samoa. Data were collected in the capitals, in larger stores which import their own foods.

Subjects: Processed foods in stores.

Results: The data from 6041 foods and drinks were recorded. Fifty four countries of origin were identified, with the main provider of food for each Pacific Island country being that with which it was most strongly linked politically. Nutrient data were not provided for 6% of the foods, imported from various countries. Inaccurate labels were found on 132 products. Over one-quarter of the foods included some nutrient or health-related claims.

Conclusions: The globalisation of the food supply is having considerable impacts on diets in the Pacific Islands. While nutrient labels can be informative for consumers looking for healthier options, difficulties still exist with poor labelling and interpretation can be challenging.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus