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The first human experience of a contact force sensing catheter for epicardial ablation of ventricular tachycardia.

Dabiri Abkenari L, Akca F, Van Mieghem NM, Szili-Torok T - Neth Heart J (2014)

Bottom Line: Contact force (CF) is one of the major determinants for sufficient lesion formation.CF-guided procedures are associated with enhanced lesion formation and procedural success.We report our initial experience in epicardial ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation with a force-sensing catheter using a new approach with an angioplasty balloon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Electrophysiology, Department of Cardiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Contact force (CF) is one of the major determinants for sufficient lesion formation. CF-guided procedures are associated with enhanced lesion formation and procedural success. We report our initial experience in epicardial ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation with a force-sensing catheter using a new approach with an angioplasty balloon. Two patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy who underwent prior unsuccessful endocardial ablation were treated with epicardial VT ablation. CF data were used to titrate force, power and ablation time.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

a Electroanatomical map from Case 2 after ablation. Sites where RF applications were applied are indicated by red dots. Ablation was performed along the borders of the scar region (marked by grey coloration). b Intra-cardiac electrograms at the successful ablation site showing late potentials (fragmented potentials occurring after the end of surface QRS complex) recorded by the ablation catheter. During ablation termination of the tachycardia occurred
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Fig3: a Electroanatomical map from Case 2 after ablation. Sites where RF applications were applied are indicated by red dots. Ablation was performed along the borders of the scar region (marked by grey coloration). b Intra-cardiac electrograms at the successful ablation site showing late potentials (fragmented potentials occurring after the end of surface QRS complex) recorded by the ablation catheter. During ablation termination of the tachycardia occurred

Mentions: During the procedure two distinct VTs (cycle length 370 ms and 330 ms) with left bundle branch block morphology, left axis and initial slurring in the QRS complex were reproducibly induced by programmed ventricular stimulation. Epicardial mapping identified their origin in the apical region of the right ventricle, where dense scar bordered healthy tissue. A linear epicardial line of ablation was drawn from the border of the scar to the healthy tissue (Fig. 3a). The VT terminated during the third ablation point (Fig. 3b). The tachycardia was no longer inducible after ablation, even after a 30-min waiting period.Fig. 3


The first human experience of a contact force sensing catheter for epicardial ablation of ventricular tachycardia.

Dabiri Abkenari L, Akca F, Van Mieghem NM, Szili-Torok T - Neth Heart J (2014)

a Electroanatomical map from Case 2 after ablation. Sites where RF applications were applied are indicated by red dots. Ablation was performed along the borders of the scar region (marked by grey coloration). b Intra-cardiac electrograms at the successful ablation site showing late potentials (fragmented potentials occurring after the end of surface QRS complex) recorded by the ablation catheter. During ablation termination of the tachycardia occurred
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016330&req=5

Fig3: a Electroanatomical map from Case 2 after ablation. Sites where RF applications were applied are indicated by red dots. Ablation was performed along the borders of the scar region (marked by grey coloration). b Intra-cardiac electrograms at the successful ablation site showing late potentials (fragmented potentials occurring after the end of surface QRS complex) recorded by the ablation catheter. During ablation termination of the tachycardia occurred
Mentions: During the procedure two distinct VTs (cycle length 370 ms and 330 ms) with left bundle branch block morphology, left axis and initial slurring in the QRS complex were reproducibly induced by programmed ventricular stimulation. Epicardial mapping identified their origin in the apical region of the right ventricle, where dense scar bordered healthy tissue. A linear epicardial line of ablation was drawn from the border of the scar to the healthy tissue (Fig. 3a). The VT terminated during the third ablation point (Fig. 3b). The tachycardia was no longer inducible after ablation, even after a 30-min waiting period.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Contact force (CF) is one of the major determinants for sufficient lesion formation.CF-guided procedures are associated with enhanced lesion formation and procedural success.We report our initial experience in epicardial ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation with a force-sensing catheter using a new approach with an angioplasty balloon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Electrophysiology, Department of Cardiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Contact force (CF) is one of the major determinants for sufficient lesion formation. CF-guided procedures are associated with enhanced lesion formation and procedural success. We report our initial experience in epicardial ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation with a force-sensing catheter using a new approach with an angioplasty balloon. Two patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy who underwent prior unsuccessful endocardial ablation were treated with epicardial VT ablation. CF data were used to titrate force, power and ablation time.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus