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The first human experience of a contact force sensing catheter for epicardial ablation of ventricular tachycardia.

Dabiri Abkenari L, Akca F, Van Mieghem NM, Szili-Torok T - Neth Heart J (2014)

Bottom Line: Contact force (CF) is one of the major determinants for sufficient lesion formation.CF-guided procedures are associated with enhanced lesion formation and procedural success.We report our initial experience in epicardial ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation with a force-sensing catheter using a new approach with an angioplasty balloon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Electrophysiology, Department of Cardiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Contact force (CF) is one of the major determinants for sufficient lesion formation. CF-guided procedures are associated with enhanced lesion formation and procedural success. We report our initial experience in epicardial ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation with a force-sensing catheter using a new approach with an angioplasty balloon. Two patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy who underwent prior unsuccessful endocardial ablation were treated with epicardial VT ablation. CF data were used to titrate force, power and ablation time.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

12-lead ECG displaying non-sustained VT with a left bundle branch block morphology and inferior axis, suggestive for RVOT origin
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Fig2: 12-lead ECG displaying non-sustained VT with a left bundle branch block morphology and inferior axis, suggestive for RVOT origin

Mentions: A 67-year-old man diagnosed with ARVC and a preserved systolic left ventricular function presented with multiple episodes of very symptomatic non-sustained VT, which was refractory to medical therapy (Fig. 2a). The VTs had a typical morphology indicating an origin from the right outflow region. The patient had a single chamber defibrillator. Endocardial ablation had been attempted twice (1 year and 3 years previously) and failed to eliminate the substrate of the VTs. An epicardial origin was suspected on the basis of mapping during the endocardial procedure.Fig. 2


The first human experience of a contact force sensing catheter for epicardial ablation of ventricular tachycardia.

Dabiri Abkenari L, Akca F, Van Mieghem NM, Szili-Torok T - Neth Heart J (2014)

12-lead ECG displaying non-sustained VT with a left bundle branch block morphology and inferior axis, suggestive for RVOT origin
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016330&req=5

Fig2: 12-lead ECG displaying non-sustained VT with a left bundle branch block morphology and inferior axis, suggestive for RVOT origin
Mentions: A 67-year-old man diagnosed with ARVC and a preserved systolic left ventricular function presented with multiple episodes of very symptomatic non-sustained VT, which was refractory to medical therapy (Fig. 2a). The VTs had a typical morphology indicating an origin from the right outflow region. The patient had a single chamber defibrillator. Endocardial ablation had been attempted twice (1 year and 3 years previously) and failed to eliminate the substrate of the VTs. An epicardial origin was suspected on the basis of mapping during the endocardial procedure.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Contact force (CF) is one of the major determinants for sufficient lesion formation.CF-guided procedures are associated with enhanced lesion formation and procedural success.We report our initial experience in epicardial ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation with a force-sensing catheter using a new approach with an angioplasty balloon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Electrophysiology, Department of Cardiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Contact force (CF) is one of the major determinants for sufficient lesion formation. CF-guided procedures are associated with enhanced lesion formation and procedural success. We report our initial experience in epicardial ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation with a force-sensing catheter using a new approach with an angioplasty balloon. Two patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy who underwent prior unsuccessful endocardial ablation were treated with epicardial VT ablation. CF data were used to titrate force, power and ablation time.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus