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Low-temperature precipitation synthesis of flower-like ZnO with lignin amine and its optical properties.

Miao TT, Sun DX, Guo YR, Li C, Ma YL, Fang GZ, Pan QJ - Nanoscale Res Lett (2013)

Bottom Line: It is found that the morphology of ZnO and its specific surface area are capable of being tuned by varying the added lignin amine amount.Using the optimal 10 mL lignin amine, the synthesized ZnO exhibits flower-like morphology with proper specific surface area.Their intensities were revealed to depend on the added lignin amine amount as well as on the molar ratio of Zn2+/OH-.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material Science & Technology (Ministry of Education), Materials Science and Engineering College, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China. guoyrnefu@163.com.

ABSTRACT
A facile precipitation method has been developed to synthesize ZnO with [bis(2-aminoethyl)amino]methyl lignin (lignin amine) that is chemically modified from low-cost pulp industrial lignin. The obtained ZnO crystallites have been characterized to exhibit a hexagonal wurtzite structure, and their sizes have been determined at ca. 24 nm (mean value). These ZnO nanocrystallites are of high purity and well crystallized. Our present synthetic approach apparently exempts the commonly used calcining purification procedure. It is found that the morphology of ZnO and its specific surface area are capable of being tuned by varying the added lignin amine amount. Using the optimal 10 mL lignin amine, the synthesized ZnO exhibits flower-like morphology with proper specific surface area. Additionally, photoluminescence property of the obtainable ZnO displays two emissive bands at 383 nm (sharp) and in the range of 480 to 600 nm (broad) at room temperature. Their intensities were revealed to depend on the added lignin amine amount as well as on the molar ratio of Zn2+/OH-. The present investigation demonstrates that our method is simple, eco-friendly, and cost-effective for the synthesis of small-size ZnO materials.

No MeSH data available.


SEM images of the ZnO nanocrystallites. (a) ZnO-0, (b) ZnO-5, (c) ZnO-10, and (d) ZnO-15. The insets in (a) and (c) are high-magnification images.
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Figure 3: SEM images of the ZnO nanocrystallites. (a) ZnO-0, (b) ZnO-5, (c) ZnO-10, and (d) ZnO-15. The insets in (a) and (c) are high-magnification images.

Mentions: In order to explore the effects of the added lignin amine on the morphology and specific surface area of the ZnO nanocrystallites, we have synthesized ZnO using 0, 5, 10, and 15 mL lignin amine. The obtained SEM images are given in Figure 3. One can see that the ZnO prepared with 10 mL lignin amine has the most favorable morphology in Figure 3c, although others also exhibit general flower-like structures. ZnO-0 is composed of non-uniform microneedles (Figure 3a), giving rise to the average length of 1.94 μm and very small BET specific surface area of 1.7 m2 g-1. When using 5 mL lignin amine (i.e., ZnO-5), flowers formed by slices have been observed with not large BET specific surface area of 12.3 m2 g-1. Regarding the synthesized ZnO-10, both good flower-like morphology (Figure 3c) and a high BET surface area of 21.5 m2 g-1 have been achieved. When increasing the lignin amine amount to 15 mL, nanosheet structures of ZnO-15 (Figure 3d) were obtained with a surface area of 6.1 m2 g-1. Therefore, the amount of lignin amine plays a predominant role in determining the morphologies of ZnO nanomaterials as well as controlling their specific surface area.


Low-temperature precipitation synthesis of flower-like ZnO with lignin amine and its optical properties.

Miao TT, Sun DX, Guo YR, Li C, Ma YL, Fang GZ, Pan QJ - Nanoscale Res Lett (2013)

SEM images of the ZnO nanocrystallites. (a) ZnO-0, (b) ZnO-5, (c) ZnO-10, and (d) ZnO-15. The insets in (a) and (c) are high-magnification images.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016318&req=5

Figure 3: SEM images of the ZnO nanocrystallites. (a) ZnO-0, (b) ZnO-5, (c) ZnO-10, and (d) ZnO-15. The insets in (a) and (c) are high-magnification images.
Mentions: In order to explore the effects of the added lignin amine on the morphology and specific surface area of the ZnO nanocrystallites, we have synthesized ZnO using 0, 5, 10, and 15 mL lignin amine. The obtained SEM images are given in Figure 3. One can see that the ZnO prepared with 10 mL lignin amine has the most favorable morphology in Figure 3c, although others also exhibit general flower-like structures. ZnO-0 is composed of non-uniform microneedles (Figure 3a), giving rise to the average length of 1.94 μm and very small BET specific surface area of 1.7 m2 g-1. When using 5 mL lignin amine (i.e., ZnO-5), flowers formed by slices have been observed with not large BET specific surface area of 12.3 m2 g-1. Regarding the synthesized ZnO-10, both good flower-like morphology (Figure 3c) and a high BET surface area of 21.5 m2 g-1 have been achieved. When increasing the lignin amine amount to 15 mL, nanosheet structures of ZnO-15 (Figure 3d) were obtained with a surface area of 6.1 m2 g-1. Therefore, the amount of lignin amine plays a predominant role in determining the morphologies of ZnO nanomaterials as well as controlling their specific surface area.

Bottom Line: It is found that the morphology of ZnO and its specific surface area are capable of being tuned by varying the added lignin amine amount.Using the optimal 10 mL lignin amine, the synthesized ZnO exhibits flower-like morphology with proper specific surface area.Their intensities were revealed to depend on the added lignin amine amount as well as on the molar ratio of Zn2+/OH-.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Bio-based Material Science & Technology (Ministry of Education), Materials Science and Engineering College, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China. guoyrnefu@163.com.

ABSTRACT
A facile precipitation method has been developed to synthesize ZnO with [bis(2-aminoethyl)amino]methyl lignin (lignin amine) that is chemically modified from low-cost pulp industrial lignin. The obtained ZnO crystallites have been characterized to exhibit a hexagonal wurtzite structure, and their sizes have been determined at ca. 24 nm (mean value). These ZnO nanocrystallites are of high purity and well crystallized. Our present synthetic approach apparently exempts the commonly used calcining purification procedure. It is found that the morphology of ZnO and its specific surface area are capable of being tuned by varying the added lignin amine amount. Using the optimal 10 mL lignin amine, the synthesized ZnO exhibits flower-like morphology with proper specific surface area. Additionally, photoluminescence property of the obtainable ZnO displays two emissive bands at 383 nm (sharp) and in the range of 480 to 600 nm (broad) at room temperature. Their intensities were revealed to depend on the added lignin amine amount as well as on the molar ratio of Zn2+/OH-. The present investigation demonstrates that our method is simple, eco-friendly, and cost-effective for the synthesis of small-size ZnO materials.

No MeSH data available.