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An invasive clonal plant benefits from clonal integration more than a co-occurring native plant in nutrient-patchy and competitive environments.

You W, Fan S, Yu D, Xie D, Liu C - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Here, we hypothesize that clonal integration affect growth, photosynthetic performance, biomass allocation and thus competitive ability of invasive and native clonal plants, and invasive clonal plants benefit from clonal integration more than co-occurring native plants in heterogeneous habitats.Moreover, clonal integration increased A. philoxeroides's biomass allocation to roots without competition, but decreased it with competition, especially when the basal ramets were in nutrient-rich sections.These results supported our hypothesis that invasive clonal plants A. philoxeroides benefits from clonal integration more than co-occurring native J. repens, suggesting that the invasiveness of A. philoxeroides may be closely related to clonal integration in heterogeneous environments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The National Field Station of Lake Ecosystem of Liangzi Lake, College of Life Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, however, little is known about the different roles of clonal integration effects between invasive and native plants. Here, we hypothesize that clonal integration affect growth, photosynthetic performance, biomass allocation and thus competitive ability of invasive and native clonal plants, and invasive clonal plants benefit from clonal integration more than co-occurring native plants in heterogeneous habitats. To test these hypotheses, two stoloniferous clonal plants, Alternanthera philoxeroides (invasive), Jussiaea repens (native) were studied in China. The apical parts of both species were grown either with or without neighboring vegetation and the basal parts without competitors were in nutrient- rich or -poor habitats, with stolon connections were either severed or kept intact. Competition significantly reduced growth and photosynthetic performance of the apical ramets in both species, but not the biomass of neighboring vegetation. Without competition, clonal integration greatly improved the growth and photosynthetic performance of both species, especially when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. When grown with neighboring vegetation, growth of J. repens and photosynthetic performance of both species were significantly enhanced by clonal integration with the basal parts in both nutrient-rich and -poor habitats, while growth and relative neighbor effect (RNE) of A. philoxeroides were greatly improved by clonal integration only when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. Moreover, clonal integration increased A. philoxeroides's biomass allocation to roots without competition, but decreased it with competition, especially when the basal ramets were in nutrient-rich sections. Effects of clonal integration on biomass allocation of J. repens was similar to that of A. philoxeroides but with less significance. These results supported our hypothesis that invasive clonal plants A. philoxeroides benefits from clonal integration more than co-occurring native J. repens, suggesting that the invasiveness of A. philoxeroides may be closely related to clonal integration in heterogeneous environments.

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Effects of integration treatments and competition on growth measures of the two clonal plants.Total biomass, ramet number, stolon length, leaf number and total leaf area of the invasive plant A. philoxeroides (left: A, B, C, D, E) or native plant J. repens (right: F, G, H, I, J) in the apical sections, grown either with or without competitive vegetation (J. repens or A. philoxeroides) in three integration treatments. Data indicate the means ± SE. Bars sharing the same letter are not significantly different at P = 0.05.
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pone-0097246-g002: Effects of integration treatments and competition on growth measures of the two clonal plants.Total biomass, ramet number, stolon length, leaf number and total leaf area of the invasive plant A. philoxeroides (left: A, B, C, D, E) or native plant J. repens (right: F, G, H, I, J) in the apical sections, grown either with or without competitive vegetation (J. repens or A. philoxeroides) in three integration treatments. Data indicate the means ± SE. Bars sharing the same letter are not significantly different at P = 0.05.

Mentions: Integration treatments and competition had significant effects on growth of both clonal species in the apical sections, and their interaction was also significant for A. philoxeroides but not for J. repens (Table 1). Competition greatly reduced the growth measures (including total biomass, number of ramets and leaves, stolon length and total leaf area) of the two clonal species (Table 1, Fig 2). Without competition, clonal integration greatly improved the growth of both of these two species in the apical sections, especially when the basal parts of the clonal fragments were in nutrient-rich patches (Fig 2A, B, C, D, E). However, with competition, clonal integration had no significant effect on the growth of A. philoxeroides but greatly enhanced that when its basal parts were in nutrient-rich sections (Fig 2A, B, C, D, E). For J. repens, the responses of the growth to integration treatments with competition were similar to that without competition (Fig 2F, G, H, I, J).


An invasive clonal plant benefits from clonal integration more than a co-occurring native plant in nutrient-patchy and competitive environments.

You W, Fan S, Yu D, Xie D, Liu C - PLoS ONE (2014)

Effects of integration treatments and competition on growth measures of the two clonal plants.Total biomass, ramet number, stolon length, leaf number and total leaf area of the invasive plant A. philoxeroides (left: A, B, C, D, E) or native plant J. repens (right: F, G, H, I, J) in the apical sections, grown either with or without competitive vegetation (J. repens or A. philoxeroides) in three integration treatments. Data indicate the means ± SE. Bars sharing the same letter are not significantly different at P = 0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016286&req=5

pone-0097246-g002: Effects of integration treatments and competition on growth measures of the two clonal plants.Total biomass, ramet number, stolon length, leaf number and total leaf area of the invasive plant A. philoxeroides (left: A, B, C, D, E) or native plant J. repens (right: F, G, H, I, J) in the apical sections, grown either with or without competitive vegetation (J. repens or A. philoxeroides) in three integration treatments. Data indicate the means ± SE. Bars sharing the same letter are not significantly different at P = 0.05.
Mentions: Integration treatments and competition had significant effects on growth of both clonal species in the apical sections, and their interaction was also significant for A. philoxeroides but not for J. repens (Table 1). Competition greatly reduced the growth measures (including total biomass, number of ramets and leaves, stolon length and total leaf area) of the two clonal species (Table 1, Fig 2). Without competition, clonal integration greatly improved the growth of both of these two species in the apical sections, especially when the basal parts of the clonal fragments were in nutrient-rich patches (Fig 2A, B, C, D, E). However, with competition, clonal integration had no significant effect on the growth of A. philoxeroides but greatly enhanced that when its basal parts were in nutrient-rich sections (Fig 2A, B, C, D, E). For J. repens, the responses of the growth to integration treatments with competition were similar to that without competition (Fig 2F, G, H, I, J).

Bottom Line: Here, we hypothesize that clonal integration affect growth, photosynthetic performance, biomass allocation and thus competitive ability of invasive and native clonal plants, and invasive clonal plants benefit from clonal integration more than co-occurring native plants in heterogeneous habitats.Moreover, clonal integration increased A. philoxeroides's biomass allocation to roots without competition, but decreased it with competition, especially when the basal ramets were in nutrient-rich sections.These results supported our hypothesis that invasive clonal plants A. philoxeroides benefits from clonal integration more than co-occurring native J. repens, suggesting that the invasiveness of A. philoxeroides may be closely related to clonal integration in heterogeneous environments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The National Field Station of Lake Ecosystem of Liangzi Lake, College of Life Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Many notorious invasive plants are clonal, however, little is known about the different roles of clonal integration effects between invasive and native plants. Here, we hypothesize that clonal integration affect growth, photosynthetic performance, biomass allocation and thus competitive ability of invasive and native clonal plants, and invasive clonal plants benefit from clonal integration more than co-occurring native plants in heterogeneous habitats. To test these hypotheses, two stoloniferous clonal plants, Alternanthera philoxeroides (invasive), Jussiaea repens (native) were studied in China. The apical parts of both species were grown either with or without neighboring vegetation and the basal parts without competitors were in nutrient- rich or -poor habitats, with stolon connections were either severed or kept intact. Competition significantly reduced growth and photosynthetic performance of the apical ramets in both species, but not the biomass of neighboring vegetation. Without competition, clonal integration greatly improved the growth and photosynthetic performance of both species, especially when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. When grown with neighboring vegetation, growth of J. repens and photosynthetic performance of both species were significantly enhanced by clonal integration with the basal parts in both nutrient-rich and -poor habitats, while growth and relative neighbor effect (RNE) of A. philoxeroides were greatly improved by clonal integration only when the basal parts were in nutrient-rich habitats. Moreover, clonal integration increased A. philoxeroides's biomass allocation to roots without competition, but decreased it with competition, especially when the basal ramets were in nutrient-rich sections. Effects of clonal integration on biomass allocation of J. repens was similar to that of A. philoxeroides but with less significance. These results supported our hypothesis that invasive clonal plants A. philoxeroides benefits from clonal integration more than co-occurring native J. repens, suggesting that the invasiveness of A. philoxeroides may be closely related to clonal integration in heterogeneous environments.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus