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Preclinical atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome increase cardio- and cerebrovascular events rate: a 20-year follow up.

Novo S, Peritore A, Trovato RL, Guarneri FP, Di Lisi D, Muratori I, Novo G - Cardiovasc Diabetol (2013)

Bottom Line: In addition, considering the 63 total events occurred in patients without atherosclerotic lesions, 36 events were recorded in the subgroup with MetS and 27 events in the subgroup without MetS (45% vs. 22.88%; P = 0.0019).Finally, in 179 total events recorded in patients with preclinical carotid atherosclerosis, 108 happened in the subgroup with MetS and 71 happened in the subgroup without MetS (63.15% vs. 44.37%; P = 0.0009).Preclinical atherosclerosis leads to an increased risk of cardiovascular events, especially if it is associated with MetS.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Chair of Cardiovascular Disease and Centre for the Early Diagnosis of Preclinical and Multifocal Atherosclerosis and for Secondary Prevention, Department of Internal Medicine and Specialties (DIBIMIS), University of Palermo, Via del Vespro n, 139-90127, Palermo, Italy. salvatore.novo@unipa.it.

ABSTRACT

Background: Intima-media thickness (IMT) is a validated marker of preclinical atherosclerosis and a predictor of cardiovascular events.

Patients: We studied a population of 529 asymptomatic patients (age 62 ± 12.8 years), divided into two groups of subjects with and without Metabolic Syndrome (MetS).

Methods: All patients, at baseline, have had a carotid ultrasound evaluation and classified in two subgroups: the first one without atherosclerotic lesions and the second one with preclinical atherosclerosis (increased IMT or asymptomatic carotid plaque). Cardiovascular endpoints were investigated in a 20-years follow-up.

Results: There were 242 cardiovascular events: 144 among patients with MetS and 98 among in healthy controls (57.4% vs. 35.2%; P < 0.0001). 63 events occurred in patients with normal carotid arteries, while 179 events occurred in patients with preclinical atherosclerosis (31.8% vs. 54.1%; P < 0.0001). Of the 144 total events occurred in patients with MetS, 36 happened in the subgroup with normal carotid arteries and 108 in the subgroup with preclinical atherosclerosis (45% vs. 63.15%; P = 0.009). 98 events occurred in patients without MetS, of which 27 in the subgroup with normal carotid arteries and 71 in the subgroup with preclinical atherosclerosis (22.88% vs. 44.37%; P = 0.0003). In addition, considering the 63 total events occurred in patients without atherosclerotic lesions, 36 events were recorded in the subgroup with MetS and 27 events in the subgroup without MetS (45% vs. 22.88%; P = 0.0019). Finally, in 179 total events recorded in patients with preclinical carotid atherosclerosis, 108 happened in the subgroup with MetS and 71 happened in the subgroup without MetS (63.15% vs. 44.37%; P = 0.0009). The Kaplan-Meier function showed an improved survival in patients without atherosclerotic lesions compared with patients with carotid ultrasound alterations (P = 0.01, HR: 0.7366, CI: 0.5479 to 0.9904).

Conclusions: Preclinical atherosclerosis leads to an increased risk of cardiovascular events, especially if it is associated with MetS.

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Distribution of cardiovascular events in relation to preclinical atherosclerosis and MetS.
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Figure 3: Distribution of cardiovascular events in relation to preclinical atherosclerosis and MetS.

Mentions: As to the presence or absence of carotid preclinical atherosclerosis, 63 events occurred in patients with normal carotid arteries (198 patients), while 179 events occurred in patients with preclinical atherosclerosis (increased IMT/asymptomatic plaque; 331 patients); (31.8% vs. 54.1%; P < 0.0001). In the 144 total events occurred in patients with MetS, 36 happened in the subgroup of patients with normal carotid arteries and 108 happened in the subgroup of patients with preclinical atherosclerosis (45% vs. 63.15%; P = 0.0099). Similarly, in the 98 total events occurred in patients without MetS, 27 developed in the subgroup with normal carotid arteries and 71 in the subgroup with preclinical atherosclerosis (22.88% vs. 44.37%; P = 0.0003). So, preclinical atherosclerosis produced a significant increase of the risk of events, especially in presence of MetS (Table 3; Figure 2). In addition, in the 63 total events occurred in patients without atherosclerotic lesions, 36 events were recorded in the subgroup with MetS and 27 events in the subgroup without MetS (45% vs. 22.88%; P = 0.0018). Of the 179 total events recorded in patients with atherosclerotic lesions, 108 events happened in the subgroup with MetS and 71 events in the subgroup without MetS (63.15% vs. 44.37%; P = 0.0009). So, both in patients with preclinical atherosclerosis and in patients without atherosclerotic lesions the presence of MetS increased the risk of CV events (Table 3; Figure 3).


Preclinical atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome increase cardio- and cerebrovascular events rate: a 20-year follow up.

Novo S, Peritore A, Trovato RL, Guarneri FP, Di Lisi D, Muratori I, Novo G - Cardiovasc Diabetol (2013)

Distribution of cardiovascular events in relation to preclinical atherosclerosis and MetS.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016285&req=5

Figure 3: Distribution of cardiovascular events in relation to preclinical atherosclerosis and MetS.
Mentions: As to the presence or absence of carotid preclinical atherosclerosis, 63 events occurred in patients with normal carotid arteries (198 patients), while 179 events occurred in patients with preclinical atherosclerosis (increased IMT/asymptomatic plaque; 331 patients); (31.8% vs. 54.1%; P < 0.0001). In the 144 total events occurred in patients with MetS, 36 happened in the subgroup of patients with normal carotid arteries and 108 happened in the subgroup of patients with preclinical atherosclerosis (45% vs. 63.15%; P = 0.0099). Similarly, in the 98 total events occurred in patients without MetS, 27 developed in the subgroup with normal carotid arteries and 71 in the subgroup with preclinical atherosclerosis (22.88% vs. 44.37%; P = 0.0003). So, preclinical atherosclerosis produced a significant increase of the risk of events, especially in presence of MetS (Table 3; Figure 2). In addition, in the 63 total events occurred in patients without atherosclerotic lesions, 36 events were recorded in the subgroup with MetS and 27 events in the subgroup without MetS (45% vs. 22.88%; P = 0.0018). Of the 179 total events recorded in patients with atherosclerotic lesions, 108 events happened in the subgroup with MetS and 71 events in the subgroup without MetS (63.15% vs. 44.37%; P = 0.0009). So, both in patients with preclinical atherosclerosis and in patients without atherosclerotic lesions the presence of MetS increased the risk of CV events (Table 3; Figure 3).

Bottom Line: In addition, considering the 63 total events occurred in patients without atherosclerotic lesions, 36 events were recorded in the subgroup with MetS and 27 events in the subgroup without MetS (45% vs. 22.88%; P = 0.0019).Finally, in 179 total events recorded in patients with preclinical carotid atherosclerosis, 108 happened in the subgroup with MetS and 71 happened in the subgroup without MetS (63.15% vs. 44.37%; P = 0.0009).Preclinical atherosclerosis leads to an increased risk of cardiovascular events, especially if it is associated with MetS.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Chair of Cardiovascular Disease and Centre for the Early Diagnosis of Preclinical and Multifocal Atherosclerosis and for Secondary Prevention, Department of Internal Medicine and Specialties (DIBIMIS), University of Palermo, Via del Vespro n, 139-90127, Palermo, Italy. salvatore.novo@unipa.it.

ABSTRACT

Background: Intima-media thickness (IMT) is a validated marker of preclinical atherosclerosis and a predictor of cardiovascular events.

Patients: We studied a population of 529 asymptomatic patients (age 62 ± 12.8 years), divided into two groups of subjects with and without Metabolic Syndrome (MetS).

Methods: All patients, at baseline, have had a carotid ultrasound evaluation and classified in two subgroups: the first one without atherosclerotic lesions and the second one with preclinical atherosclerosis (increased IMT or asymptomatic carotid plaque). Cardiovascular endpoints were investigated in a 20-years follow-up.

Results: There were 242 cardiovascular events: 144 among patients with MetS and 98 among in healthy controls (57.4% vs. 35.2%; P < 0.0001). 63 events occurred in patients with normal carotid arteries, while 179 events occurred in patients with preclinical atherosclerosis (31.8% vs. 54.1%; P < 0.0001). Of the 144 total events occurred in patients with MetS, 36 happened in the subgroup with normal carotid arteries and 108 in the subgroup with preclinical atherosclerosis (45% vs. 63.15%; P = 0.009). 98 events occurred in patients without MetS, of which 27 in the subgroup with normal carotid arteries and 71 in the subgroup with preclinical atherosclerosis (22.88% vs. 44.37%; P = 0.0003). In addition, considering the 63 total events occurred in patients without atherosclerotic lesions, 36 events were recorded in the subgroup with MetS and 27 events in the subgroup without MetS (45% vs. 22.88%; P = 0.0019). Finally, in 179 total events recorded in patients with preclinical carotid atherosclerosis, 108 happened in the subgroup with MetS and 71 happened in the subgroup without MetS (63.15% vs. 44.37%; P = 0.0009). The Kaplan-Meier function showed an improved survival in patients without atherosclerotic lesions compared with patients with carotid ultrasound alterations (P = 0.01, HR: 0.7366, CI: 0.5479 to 0.9904).

Conclusions: Preclinical atherosclerosis leads to an increased risk of cardiovascular events, especially if it is associated with MetS.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus