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A pilot study to examine the correlation between cognition and blood biomarkers in a Singapore Chinese male cohort with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Goh DA, Dong Y, Lee WY, Koay WI, Tay SZ, Soon D, Chen C, Brittain CF, Lowe SL, Wong BS - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Among diabetic statin users, HDL, LDL and total cholesterol were negatively correlated with executive function, whereas peripheral insulin levels and insulin resistance were negatively associated with attention.Diabetic statin users were likely to have poorer performance in attention and executive function.Increasing levels of the peripheral biomarkers are likely to contribute to poorer cognitive performance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.

ABSTRACT

Background: Diabetes is reported to be linked to poorer cognitive function. The purpose of this study is to examine (a) clinical correlation between cognitive function and the biochemical perturbations in T2DM, and (b) the impact of statin treatment on cognitive function in diabetic subjects.

Methods: Forty Singaporean Chinese males with diabetes and twenty Singaporean Chinese males without diabetes were recruited for this study. Twenty-two of the diabetic subjects were on statin therapy and all subjects were non-demented. This was a 2-period non-interventional case-control study in which subjects were assessed for cognitive function in period 1 and blood samples taken over 2 periods, approximately 1 week apart. Blood was collected to determine the level of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglycerides, glucose and insulin. Cognitive performance was measured by a neuropsychological battery covering domains of attention, language, verbal and visual memory, visuomotor speed and executive function. Z-scores were derived for each cognitive domain using the mean and standard deviations (SDs), and they were used to compare between (a) diabetic and non-diabetic groups, and (b) diabetic subjects with and without statin treatment. ANCOVAs with age, education, BMI, and the duration of diabetes as covariates were employed to examine differences in mean score of cognitive domains and subtests between the two groups.

Results: Overall cognitive function was similar among diabetics and age matched non-diabetic controls. Among diabetic statin users, HDL, LDL and total cholesterol were negatively correlated with executive function, whereas peripheral insulin levels and insulin resistance were negatively associated with attention.

Conclusion: Diabetic statin users were likely to have poorer performance in attention and executive function. Increasing levels of the peripheral biomarkers are likely to contribute to poorer cognitive performance.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Analysis of blood biomarkers in study subjects.(A) The level of blood HDL, LDL, TG and cholesterol in diabetics (n = 40, grey) and non-diabetics (n = 20, white) subjects. (B) The level of blood glucose and insulin in diabetics (n = 40, grey) and non-diabetics (n = 20, white) subjects. HOMA-IR values are computed with the measured blood glucose and insulin levels using the formula given in the methods section [19]. Each value represents the mean ± SD of duplicate assays for individual samples (*p = 0.009; **p = 0.004; ***p<0.001; ****p = 0.014, using Student's t-test).
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pone-0096874-g001: Analysis of blood biomarkers in study subjects.(A) The level of blood HDL, LDL, TG and cholesterol in diabetics (n = 40, grey) and non-diabetics (n = 20, white) subjects. (B) The level of blood glucose and insulin in diabetics (n = 40, grey) and non-diabetics (n = 20, white) subjects. HOMA-IR values are computed with the measured blood glucose and insulin levels using the formula given in the methods section [19]. Each value represents the mean ± SD of duplicate assays for individual samples (*p = 0.009; **p = 0.004; ***p<0.001; ****p = 0.014, using Student's t-test).

Mentions: Diabetics had significantly lower LDL (Mean (M) = 2.29 mmol/L, SD = 0.76, p = 0.009) and total cholesterol (M = 3.81 mmol/L, SD = 0.89, p = 0.004) levels than non-diabetics (M = 2.85 mmol/L, SD = 0.73; M = 4.56 mmol/L, SD = 0.97, respectively) (Figure 1a), but significantly higher glucose (M = 7.62 mmol/L, SD = 2.13 versus M = 4.91 mmol/L, SD = 0.44, p<0.001), insulin (M = 9.46 µM/mL, SD = 5.37 versus M = 6.22 µM/mL, SD = 2.82, p = 0.014), and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (M = 3.20, SD = 1.97 versus M = 1.39, SD = 0.75, p<0.001) (Figure 1b).


A pilot study to examine the correlation between cognition and blood biomarkers in a Singapore Chinese male cohort with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Goh DA, Dong Y, Lee WY, Koay WI, Tay SZ, Soon D, Chen C, Brittain CF, Lowe SL, Wong BS - PLoS ONE (2014)

Analysis of blood biomarkers in study subjects.(A) The level of blood HDL, LDL, TG and cholesterol in diabetics (n = 40, grey) and non-diabetics (n = 20, white) subjects. (B) The level of blood glucose and insulin in diabetics (n = 40, grey) and non-diabetics (n = 20, white) subjects. HOMA-IR values are computed with the measured blood glucose and insulin levels using the formula given in the methods section [19]. Each value represents the mean ± SD of duplicate assays for individual samples (*p = 0.009; **p = 0.004; ***p<0.001; ****p = 0.014, using Student's t-test).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016130&req=5

pone-0096874-g001: Analysis of blood biomarkers in study subjects.(A) The level of blood HDL, LDL, TG and cholesterol in diabetics (n = 40, grey) and non-diabetics (n = 20, white) subjects. (B) The level of blood glucose and insulin in diabetics (n = 40, grey) and non-diabetics (n = 20, white) subjects. HOMA-IR values are computed with the measured blood glucose and insulin levels using the formula given in the methods section [19]. Each value represents the mean ± SD of duplicate assays for individual samples (*p = 0.009; **p = 0.004; ***p<0.001; ****p = 0.014, using Student's t-test).
Mentions: Diabetics had significantly lower LDL (Mean (M) = 2.29 mmol/L, SD = 0.76, p = 0.009) and total cholesterol (M = 3.81 mmol/L, SD = 0.89, p = 0.004) levels than non-diabetics (M = 2.85 mmol/L, SD = 0.73; M = 4.56 mmol/L, SD = 0.97, respectively) (Figure 1a), but significantly higher glucose (M = 7.62 mmol/L, SD = 2.13 versus M = 4.91 mmol/L, SD = 0.44, p<0.001), insulin (M = 9.46 µM/mL, SD = 5.37 versus M = 6.22 µM/mL, SD = 2.82, p = 0.014), and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (M = 3.20, SD = 1.97 versus M = 1.39, SD = 0.75, p<0.001) (Figure 1b).

Bottom Line: Among diabetic statin users, HDL, LDL and total cholesterol were negatively correlated with executive function, whereas peripheral insulin levels and insulin resistance were negatively associated with attention.Diabetic statin users were likely to have poorer performance in attention and executive function.Increasing levels of the peripheral biomarkers are likely to contribute to poorer cognitive performance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.

ABSTRACT

Background: Diabetes is reported to be linked to poorer cognitive function. The purpose of this study is to examine (a) clinical correlation between cognitive function and the biochemical perturbations in T2DM, and (b) the impact of statin treatment on cognitive function in diabetic subjects.

Methods: Forty Singaporean Chinese males with diabetes and twenty Singaporean Chinese males without diabetes were recruited for this study. Twenty-two of the diabetic subjects were on statin therapy and all subjects were non-demented. This was a 2-period non-interventional case-control study in which subjects were assessed for cognitive function in period 1 and blood samples taken over 2 periods, approximately 1 week apart. Blood was collected to determine the level of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglycerides, glucose and insulin. Cognitive performance was measured by a neuropsychological battery covering domains of attention, language, verbal and visual memory, visuomotor speed and executive function. Z-scores were derived for each cognitive domain using the mean and standard deviations (SDs), and they were used to compare between (a) diabetic and non-diabetic groups, and (b) diabetic subjects with and without statin treatment. ANCOVAs with age, education, BMI, and the duration of diabetes as covariates were employed to examine differences in mean score of cognitive domains and subtests between the two groups.

Results: Overall cognitive function was similar among diabetics and age matched non-diabetic controls. Among diabetic statin users, HDL, LDL and total cholesterol were negatively correlated with executive function, whereas peripheral insulin levels and insulin resistance were negatively associated with attention.

Conclusion: Diabetic statin users were likely to have poorer performance in attention and executive function. Increasing levels of the peripheral biomarkers are likely to contribute to poorer cognitive performance.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus