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Prevalence of dyslipidemia in urban and rural India: the ICMR-INDIAB study.

Joshi SR, Anjana RM, Deepa M, Pradeepa R, Bhansali A, Dhandania VK, Joshi PP, Unnikrishnan R, Nirmal E, Subashini R, Madhu SV, Rao PV, Das AK, Kaur T, Shukla DK, Mohan V, ICMR-INDIAB Collaborative Study Gro - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Except for low HDL-C and in the state of Maharashtra, in all other states, urban residents had the highest prevalence of lipid abnormalities compared to rural residents.Low HDL-C was the most common lipid abnormality (72.3%) in all the four regions studied; in 44.9% of subjects, it was present as an isolated abnormality.The prevalence of dyslipidemia is very high in India, which calls for urgent lifestyle intervention strategies to prevent and manage this important cardiovascular risk factor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lilavati Hospital, Mumbai, India.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To study the pattern and prevalence of dyslipidemia in a large representative sample of four selected regions in India.

Methods: Phase I of the Indian Council of Medical Research-India Diabetes (ICMR-INDIAB) study was conducted in a representative population of three states of India [Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra and Jharkhand] and one Union Territory [Chandigarh], and covered a population of 213 million people using stratified multistage sampling design to recruit individuals ≥20 years of age. All the study subjects (n = 16,607) underwent anthropometric measurements and oral glucose tolerance tests were done using capillary blood (except in self-reported diabetes). In addition, in every 5th subject (n = 2042), a fasting venous sample was collected and assayed for lipids. Dyslipidemia was diagnosed using National Cholesterol Education Programme (NCEP) guidelines.

Results: Of the subjects studied, 13.9% had hypercholesterolemia, 29.5% had hypertriglyceridemia, 72.3% had low HDL-C, 11.8% had high LDL-C levels and 79% had abnormalities in one of the lipid parameters. Regional disparity exists with the highest rates of hypercholesterolemia observed in Tamilnadu (18.3%), highest rates of hypertriglyceridemia in Chandigarh (38.6%), highest rates of low HDL-C in Jharkhand (76.8%) and highest rates of high LDL-C in Tamilnadu (15.8%). Except for low HDL-C and in the state of Maharashtra, in all other states, urban residents had the highest prevalence of lipid abnormalities compared to rural residents. Low HDL-C was the most common lipid abnormality (72.3%) in all the four regions studied; in 44.9% of subjects, it was present as an isolated abnormality. Common significant risk factors for dyslipidemia included obesity, diabetes, and dysglycemia.

Conclusion: The prevalence of dyslipidemia is very high in India, which calls for urgent lifestyle intervention strategies to prevent and manage this important cardiovascular risk factor.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Venn diagram to show the overlap of the individual components of dyslipidemia [Hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol].
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pone-0096808-g001: Venn diagram to show the overlap of the individual components of dyslipidemia [Hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol].

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the overlap of the individual components of dyslipidemia. About 7.7% (n = 158) of the adult population had three lipid abnormalities (hypercholesterolemia + hypertriglyceridemia + low HDL-C) and 4.8% (n = 99) of the population had all four lipid abnormalities (hypercholesterolemia + hypertriglyceridemia + low HDL-C + high LDL-C). Only 21.1% (n = 431) had no lipid abnormality.


Prevalence of dyslipidemia in urban and rural India: the ICMR-INDIAB study.

Joshi SR, Anjana RM, Deepa M, Pradeepa R, Bhansali A, Dhandania VK, Joshi PP, Unnikrishnan R, Nirmal E, Subashini R, Madhu SV, Rao PV, Das AK, Kaur T, Shukla DK, Mohan V, ICMR-INDIAB Collaborative Study Gro - PLoS ONE (2014)

Venn diagram to show the overlap of the individual components of dyslipidemia [Hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016101&req=5

pone-0096808-g001: Venn diagram to show the overlap of the individual components of dyslipidemia [Hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol].
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the overlap of the individual components of dyslipidemia. About 7.7% (n = 158) of the adult population had three lipid abnormalities (hypercholesterolemia + hypertriglyceridemia + low HDL-C) and 4.8% (n = 99) of the population had all four lipid abnormalities (hypercholesterolemia + hypertriglyceridemia + low HDL-C + high LDL-C). Only 21.1% (n = 431) had no lipid abnormality.

Bottom Line: Except for low HDL-C and in the state of Maharashtra, in all other states, urban residents had the highest prevalence of lipid abnormalities compared to rural residents.Low HDL-C was the most common lipid abnormality (72.3%) in all the four regions studied; in 44.9% of subjects, it was present as an isolated abnormality.The prevalence of dyslipidemia is very high in India, which calls for urgent lifestyle intervention strategies to prevent and manage this important cardiovascular risk factor.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lilavati Hospital, Mumbai, India.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To study the pattern and prevalence of dyslipidemia in a large representative sample of four selected regions in India.

Methods: Phase I of the Indian Council of Medical Research-India Diabetes (ICMR-INDIAB) study was conducted in a representative population of three states of India [Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra and Jharkhand] and one Union Territory [Chandigarh], and covered a population of 213 million people using stratified multistage sampling design to recruit individuals ≥20 years of age. All the study subjects (n = 16,607) underwent anthropometric measurements and oral glucose tolerance tests were done using capillary blood (except in self-reported diabetes). In addition, in every 5th subject (n = 2042), a fasting venous sample was collected and assayed for lipids. Dyslipidemia was diagnosed using National Cholesterol Education Programme (NCEP) guidelines.

Results: Of the subjects studied, 13.9% had hypercholesterolemia, 29.5% had hypertriglyceridemia, 72.3% had low HDL-C, 11.8% had high LDL-C levels and 79% had abnormalities in one of the lipid parameters. Regional disparity exists with the highest rates of hypercholesterolemia observed in Tamilnadu (18.3%), highest rates of hypertriglyceridemia in Chandigarh (38.6%), highest rates of low HDL-C in Jharkhand (76.8%) and highest rates of high LDL-C in Tamilnadu (15.8%). Except for low HDL-C and in the state of Maharashtra, in all other states, urban residents had the highest prevalence of lipid abnormalities compared to rural residents. Low HDL-C was the most common lipid abnormality (72.3%) in all the four regions studied; in 44.9% of subjects, it was present as an isolated abnormality. Common significant risk factors for dyslipidemia included obesity, diabetes, and dysglycemia.

Conclusion: The prevalence of dyslipidemia is very high in India, which calls for urgent lifestyle intervention strategies to prevent and manage this important cardiovascular risk factor.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus