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In vitro synergistic antioxidant activity and identification of antioxidant components from Astragalus membranaceus and Paeonia lactiflora.

Xu X, Li F, Zhang X, Li P, Zhang X, Wu Z, Li D - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Many traditionally used herbs demonstrate significantly better pharmacological effects when used in combination than when used alone.Among them, E1 exhibited the strongest synergistic effect in scavenging DPPH radicals and reducing ferric ions (P<0.05).A strong correlation between the increment of total phenolic/flavonoid and synergistic antioxidant activity, especially between the increment of total flavonoid and the increase in ferric reducing power was observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China.

ABSTRACT
Many traditionally used herbs demonstrate significantly better pharmacological effects when used in combination than when used alone. However, the mechanism underlying this synergism is still poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the synergistic antioxidant activity of Astragalus membranaceus (AME) and Paeonia Lactiflora (PL), and identify the potential antioxidant components by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazine (DPPH) radical spiking test followed by a high performance liquid chromatography separation combined with diode array detection and tandem mass spectrometry analysis (DPPH-HPLC-DAD-MS/MS). Eight AME-PL combined extracts (E1-E8) were prepared based on bioactivity-guided fractionation. Among them, E1 exhibited the strongest synergistic effect in scavenging DPPH radicals and reducing ferric ions (P<0.05). Moreover, E1 presented strong cytoprotection against H2O2-induced oxidative damage in MRC-5 cells by suppressing the decrease of the superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) activities. A strong correlation between the increment of total phenolic/flavonoid and synergistic antioxidant activity, especially between the increment of total flavonoid and the increase in ferric reducing power was observed. Finally, seven antioxidant substances were identified in E1 as oxypaeoniflora, catechin, calycosin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, fomononetin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 9,10-dimethoxy-pterocarpan-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, quercetin and 2'-dihydroxy-3',4'-dimethyl-isoflavan-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside.

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DPPH radical-scavenging activity (A) and CI values (B) of eight combinations of CF-AME and chromatographic fractions from EA-PL.Data are expressed as means ± SD (n = 3), and histograms marked with different letters are significantly different at P<0.05.
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pone-0096780-g002: DPPH radical-scavenging activity (A) and CI values (B) of eight combinations of CF-AME and chromatographic fractions from EA-PL.Data are expressed as means ± SD (n = 3), and histograms marked with different letters are significantly different at P<0.05.

Mentions: As shown in Fig.2A, the highest DPPH scavenging efficiency was observed in the groups treated with E1, E4, E5 and E6, and there was no significant difference between them. E3 exhibited the highest SC50 value of 0.031 g/mL, suggesting that it had the weakest ability in scavenging DPPH free radicals among the tested samples (P<0.05). The CI values for E1–E8 were calculated using CalcuSyn software and the results were illustrated in Fig.2B. It was found that E1 and E8 had the lowest CI values (CI = 0.789 and CI = 0.786, respectively), indicating they had the strongest synergistic effect (P<0.05). It is noteworthy that the combinations demonstrating the highest antioxidant effect did not show the lowest CI (e.g. EA-PL+CF-AME and EA-PL+EA-AME in Fig.1, and E6 in Fig.2). These findings demonstrated that the combination of two antioxidants may have strong antioxidant activity, but not necessarily engender synergistic efficacy, it may even generate antagonistic interaction (as indicated by their CIs>1.0). Previous literatures have showed that the synergism might arise from a complex interaction among single ingredients with different pharmacological functions, such that one ingredient enhances the therapeutic effect of another active ingredient [22], [23] or via coalistic combinations, such that all ingredients involved are inactive individually but become active in combinations [24]. It seems that the similar interactions among ingredients did not occur in the combinations tested in this study, and thus these combinations did not exhibit the antioxidant synergism.


In vitro synergistic antioxidant activity and identification of antioxidant components from Astragalus membranaceus and Paeonia lactiflora.

Xu X, Li F, Zhang X, Li P, Zhang X, Wu Z, Li D - PLoS ONE (2014)

DPPH radical-scavenging activity (A) and CI values (B) of eight combinations of CF-AME and chromatographic fractions from EA-PL.Data are expressed as means ± SD (n = 3), and histograms marked with different letters are significantly different at P<0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4016014&req=5

pone-0096780-g002: DPPH radical-scavenging activity (A) and CI values (B) of eight combinations of CF-AME and chromatographic fractions from EA-PL.Data are expressed as means ± SD (n = 3), and histograms marked with different letters are significantly different at P<0.05.
Mentions: As shown in Fig.2A, the highest DPPH scavenging efficiency was observed in the groups treated with E1, E4, E5 and E6, and there was no significant difference between them. E3 exhibited the highest SC50 value of 0.031 g/mL, suggesting that it had the weakest ability in scavenging DPPH free radicals among the tested samples (P<0.05). The CI values for E1–E8 were calculated using CalcuSyn software and the results were illustrated in Fig.2B. It was found that E1 and E8 had the lowest CI values (CI = 0.789 and CI = 0.786, respectively), indicating they had the strongest synergistic effect (P<0.05). It is noteworthy that the combinations demonstrating the highest antioxidant effect did not show the lowest CI (e.g. EA-PL+CF-AME and EA-PL+EA-AME in Fig.1, and E6 in Fig.2). These findings demonstrated that the combination of two antioxidants may have strong antioxidant activity, but not necessarily engender synergistic efficacy, it may even generate antagonistic interaction (as indicated by their CIs>1.0). Previous literatures have showed that the synergism might arise from a complex interaction among single ingredients with different pharmacological functions, such that one ingredient enhances the therapeutic effect of another active ingredient [22], [23] or via coalistic combinations, such that all ingredients involved are inactive individually but become active in combinations [24]. It seems that the similar interactions among ingredients did not occur in the combinations tested in this study, and thus these combinations did not exhibit the antioxidant synergism.

Bottom Line: Many traditionally used herbs demonstrate significantly better pharmacological effects when used in combination than when used alone.Among them, E1 exhibited the strongest synergistic effect in scavenging DPPH radicals and reducing ferric ions (P<0.05).A strong correlation between the increment of total phenolic/flavonoid and synergistic antioxidant activity, especially between the increment of total flavonoid and the increase in ferric reducing power was observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China.

ABSTRACT
Many traditionally used herbs demonstrate significantly better pharmacological effects when used in combination than when used alone. However, the mechanism underlying this synergism is still poorly understood. This study aimed to investigate the synergistic antioxidant activity of Astragalus membranaceus (AME) and Paeonia Lactiflora (PL), and identify the potential antioxidant components by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazine (DPPH) radical spiking test followed by a high performance liquid chromatography separation combined with diode array detection and tandem mass spectrometry analysis (DPPH-HPLC-DAD-MS/MS). Eight AME-PL combined extracts (E1-E8) were prepared based on bioactivity-guided fractionation. Among them, E1 exhibited the strongest synergistic effect in scavenging DPPH radicals and reducing ferric ions (P<0.05). Moreover, E1 presented strong cytoprotection against H2O2-induced oxidative damage in MRC-5 cells by suppressing the decrease of the superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) activities. A strong correlation between the increment of total phenolic/flavonoid and synergistic antioxidant activity, especially between the increment of total flavonoid and the increase in ferric reducing power was observed. Finally, seven antioxidant substances were identified in E1 as oxypaeoniflora, catechin, calycosin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, fomononetin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 9,10-dimethoxy-pterocarpan-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, quercetin and 2'-dihydroxy-3',4'-dimethyl-isoflavan-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus