Limits...
Non-nutritive sweeteners: no class effect on the glycaemic or appetite responses to ingested glucose.

Bryant CE, Wasse LK, Astbury N, Nandra G, McLaughlin JT - Eur J Clin Nutr (2014)

Bottom Line: We determined the effect of a panel of non-nutritive sweeteners, aspartame, saccharin and acesulfame-K, delivered in doses that would be consumed in normal usage.There was no additional effect of aspartame or saccharin on the blood glucose response to oral glucose at any time point, although acesulfame-K exerted a small effect.We conclude that there is no consistent evidence that non-nutrient sweeteners, when acutely consumed with glucose in dietetically relevant doses, have a class effect in modulating blood glucose in healthy human subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK.

ABSTRACT
There is considerable interest in whether non-nutritive sweeteners are sensed in the gastrointestinal tract to modulate appetitive or absorptive responses to ingested carbohydrate. We determined the effect of a panel of non-nutritive sweeteners, aspartame, saccharin and acesulfame-K, delivered in doses that would be consumed in normal usage. Each was given in combination with glucose, assessing their effect on glycemic responses and appetite in 10 healthy human subjects. There was no additional effect of aspartame or saccharin on the blood glucose response to oral glucose at any time point, although acesulfame-K exerted a small effect. However, none had an effect on perceptions of hunger or fullness. We conclude that there is no consistent evidence that non-nutrient sweeteners, when acutely consumed with glucose in dietetically relevant doses, have a class effect in modulating blood glucose in healthy human subjects. However, acesulfame-K may require further exploration.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Graph showing blood glucose responses following the ingestion of glucose alone or glucose and a non-nutrient sweetener (aspartame, saccharin, ace-K).Values represent mean ± SEM (n=10).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4012981&req=5

Figure 1: Graph showing blood glucose responses following the ingestion of glucose alone or glucose and a non-nutrient sweetener (aspartame, saccharin, ace-K).Values represent mean ± SEM (n=10).

Mentions: All subjects tolerated the study well. There was no difference in fasting BG between conditions. Following glucose alone, BG peaked at 15 minutes (7.6 ± 0.3 mmol/L). The mean BG also peaked identically 15 minutes after the consumption of the glucose + aspartame test drink (7.6 ± 0.3 mmol/L); greater after glucose + ace-k 8.3 ± 0.4 mmol/L. The mean BG concentrations peaked 30 minutes after the consumption of the glucose + saccharin test drink (7.9 ± 0.5 mmol/L). There was a main effect of time (F(7, 63) = 38.7 p = 0.0) and time × condition interaction (F(4.8, 43.6) = 2.7 p = 0.03) indicating BG differed over time between the four conditions (Figure 1). However post-hoc analysis revealed no differences between the glucose and NNS conditions at any time point. Analysis of iAUC demonstrated a main effect of condition (F(2.6, 23.4) =3.7 p= 0.03) but post-hoc analysis revealed no differences between the glucose and NNS conditions. Examining iAUC showed a 17.4% larger integrated glycemic response following ace-K compared to glucose alone (147.1 ± 15.9 and 125.3±16.2) but a smaller response (17.8%) following aspartame (102.9 ± 12.1). Hunger decreased and fullness increased (figure 2) following consumption of all four test drinks, with no main effect of NNS on perceptions of hunger and fullness (p =0.51; p =0.09).


Non-nutritive sweeteners: no class effect on the glycaemic or appetite responses to ingested glucose.

Bryant CE, Wasse LK, Astbury N, Nandra G, McLaughlin JT - Eur J Clin Nutr (2014)

Graph showing blood glucose responses following the ingestion of glucose alone or glucose and a non-nutrient sweetener (aspartame, saccharin, ace-K).Values represent mean ± SEM (n=10).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4012981&req=5

Figure 1: Graph showing blood glucose responses following the ingestion of glucose alone or glucose and a non-nutrient sweetener (aspartame, saccharin, ace-K).Values represent mean ± SEM (n=10).
Mentions: All subjects tolerated the study well. There was no difference in fasting BG between conditions. Following glucose alone, BG peaked at 15 minutes (7.6 ± 0.3 mmol/L). The mean BG also peaked identically 15 minutes after the consumption of the glucose + aspartame test drink (7.6 ± 0.3 mmol/L); greater after glucose + ace-k 8.3 ± 0.4 mmol/L. The mean BG concentrations peaked 30 minutes after the consumption of the glucose + saccharin test drink (7.9 ± 0.5 mmol/L). There was a main effect of time (F(7, 63) = 38.7 p = 0.0) and time × condition interaction (F(4.8, 43.6) = 2.7 p = 0.03) indicating BG differed over time between the four conditions (Figure 1). However post-hoc analysis revealed no differences between the glucose and NNS conditions at any time point. Analysis of iAUC demonstrated a main effect of condition (F(2.6, 23.4) =3.7 p= 0.03) but post-hoc analysis revealed no differences between the glucose and NNS conditions. Examining iAUC showed a 17.4% larger integrated glycemic response following ace-K compared to glucose alone (147.1 ± 15.9 and 125.3±16.2) but a smaller response (17.8%) following aspartame (102.9 ± 12.1). Hunger decreased and fullness increased (figure 2) following consumption of all four test drinks, with no main effect of NNS on perceptions of hunger and fullness (p =0.51; p =0.09).

Bottom Line: We determined the effect of a panel of non-nutritive sweeteners, aspartame, saccharin and acesulfame-K, delivered in doses that would be consumed in normal usage.There was no additional effect of aspartame or saccharin on the blood glucose response to oral glucose at any time point, although acesulfame-K exerted a small effect.We conclude that there is no consistent evidence that non-nutrient sweeteners, when acutely consumed with glucose in dietetically relevant doses, have a class effect in modulating blood glucose in healthy human subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK.

ABSTRACT
There is considerable interest in whether non-nutritive sweeteners are sensed in the gastrointestinal tract to modulate appetitive or absorptive responses to ingested carbohydrate. We determined the effect of a panel of non-nutritive sweeteners, aspartame, saccharin and acesulfame-K, delivered in doses that would be consumed in normal usage. Each was given in combination with glucose, assessing their effect on glycemic responses and appetite in 10 healthy human subjects. There was no additional effect of aspartame or saccharin on the blood glucose response to oral glucose at any time point, although acesulfame-K exerted a small effect. However, none had an effect on perceptions of hunger or fullness. We conclude that there is no consistent evidence that non-nutrient sweeteners, when acutely consumed with glucose in dietetically relevant doses, have a class effect in modulating blood glucose in healthy human subjects. However, acesulfame-K may require further exploration.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus