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Secretome of the biocontrol agent metarhizium anisopliae induced by the cuticle of the cotton pest Dysdercus peruvianus reveals new insights into infection.

Beys-da-Silva WO, Santi L, Berger M, Calzolari D, Passos DO, Guimarães JA, Moresco JJ, Yates JR - J. Proteome Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: Among these proteins were classical fungal effectors secreted by pathogens to degrade physical barriers and alter host physiology.These include lipolytic enzymes, Pr1A, B, C, I, and J proteases, ROS-related proteins, oxidorreductases, and signaling proteins.On the basis of these results, we propose that M. anisopliae is degrading host components and actively secreting proteins to manage the physiology of the host.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Physiology and ‡Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute , 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, United States.

ABSTRACT
Metarhizium anisopliae is an entomopathogenic fungus that has evolved specialized strategies to infect insect hosts. Here we analyzed secreted proteins related to Dysdercus peruvianus infection. Using shotgun proteomics, abundance changes in 71 proteins were identified after exposure to host cuticle. Among these proteins were classical fungal effectors secreted by pathogens to degrade physical barriers and alter host physiology. These include lipolytic enzymes, Pr1A, B, C, I, and J proteases, ROS-related proteins, oxidorreductases, and signaling proteins. Protein interaction networks were generated postulating interesting candidates for further studies, including Pr1C, based on possible functional interactions. On the basis of these results, we propose that M. anisopliae is degrading host components and actively secreting proteins to manage the physiology of the host. Interestingly, the secretion of these factors occurs in the absence of a host response. The findings presented here are an important step in understanding the host-pathogen interaction and developing more efficient biocontrol of D. peruvianus by M. anisopliae.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Proposed schematic model of fungal effectorsand other proteinsexpressed by M. anisopliae during D. peruvianus infection, according to proteomic data.
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fig5: Proposed schematic model of fungal effectorsand other proteinsexpressed by M. anisopliae during D. peruvianus infection, according to proteomic data.

Mentions: Extracellular effectors are defined assmall molecules and proteinssecreted by pathogens into the host where they alter host-cell structureand function.71 Some of these proteinsare well known and are previously characterized fungal effectors andor signaling interfering proteins that can act on host metabolitesor proteins, possibly modifying responses to fungal infection in benefitto the pathogen.64,65,67,72 Unrelated fungal pathogens secrete the sameeffectors for creating a more compatible host environment, includingmechanisms to manipulate host-cell metabolism.72 The effector repertoire includes several proteins previouslyidentified and described: glycosyl hydrolases, proteases, ROS-relatedproteins, among others (Figure 5). Anotherclassical effector,71,73 the cysteine-rich protein, wasalso identified. The combination of all proteins identified duringthe artificial activation of the infection system could reveal that M. anisopliae is not only degrading and consuming host componentsbut also is actively modulating host physiology by the secretion ofdifferent proteins. Also, as presented in Table 4, the proteins found in our study presented orthologs in severaldifferent fungal pathogens, which is possible evidence of correlationand conservation of different pathogenic systems linked to differenthosts. According to this analysis of putative orthologs, the proteinaseinhibitor I4 had the best match corresponding to a Drosophilamelanogaster protein, which reinforces the idea that thefungus is possibly actively interfering the host response. This inhibitorhaving the best match corresponding to an arthropod protein couldprobably be because it inhibits proteases expressed by the host, anarthropod, during the infection.


Secretome of the biocontrol agent metarhizium anisopliae induced by the cuticle of the cotton pest Dysdercus peruvianus reveals new insights into infection.

Beys-da-Silva WO, Santi L, Berger M, Calzolari D, Passos DO, Guimarães JA, Moresco JJ, Yates JR - J. Proteome Res. (2014)

Proposed schematic model of fungal effectorsand other proteinsexpressed by M. anisopliae during D. peruvianus infection, according to proteomic data.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4012838&req=5

fig5: Proposed schematic model of fungal effectorsand other proteinsexpressed by M. anisopliae during D. peruvianus infection, according to proteomic data.
Mentions: Extracellular effectors are defined assmall molecules and proteinssecreted by pathogens into the host where they alter host-cell structureand function.71 Some of these proteinsare well known and are previously characterized fungal effectors andor signaling interfering proteins that can act on host metabolitesor proteins, possibly modifying responses to fungal infection in benefitto the pathogen.64,65,67,72 Unrelated fungal pathogens secrete the sameeffectors for creating a more compatible host environment, includingmechanisms to manipulate host-cell metabolism.72 The effector repertoire includes several proteins previouslyidentified and described: glycosyl hydrolases, proteases, ROS-relatedproteins, among others (Figure 5). Anotherclassical effector,71,73 the cysteine-rich protein, wasalso identified. The combination of all proteins identified duringthe artificial activation of the infection system could reveal that M. anisopliae is not only degrading and consuming host componentsbut also is actively modulating host physiology by the secretion ofdifferent proteins. Also, as presented in Table 4, the proteins found in our study presented orthologs in severaldifferent fungal pathogens, which is possible evidence of correlationand conservation of different pathogenic systems linked to differenthosts. According to this analysis of putative orthologs, the proteinaseinhibitor I4 had the best match corresponding to a Drosophilamelanogaster protein, which reinforces the idea that thefungus is possibly actively interfering the host response. This inhibitorhaving the best match corresponding to an arthropod protein couldprobably be because it inhibits proteases expressed by the host, anarthropod, during the infection.

Bottom Line: Among these proteins were classical fungal effectors secreted by pathogens to degrade physical barriers and alter host physiology.These include lipolytic enzymes, Pr1A, B, C, I, and J proteases, ROS-related proteins, oxidorreductases, and signaling proteins.On the basis of these results, we propose that M. anisopliae is degrading host components and actively secreting proteins to manage the physiology of the host.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemical Physiology and ‡Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute , 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, United States.

ABSTRACT
Metarhizium anisopliae is an entomopathogenic fungus that has evolved specialized strategies to infect insect hosts. Here we analyzed secreted proteins related to Dysdercus peruvianus infection. Using shotgun proteomics, abundance changes in 71 proteins were identified after exposure to host cuticle. Among these proteins were classical fungal effectors secreted by pathogens to degrade physical barriers and alter host physiology. These include lipolytic enzymes, Pr1A, B, C, I, and J proteases, ROS-related proteins, oxidorreductases, and signaling proteins. Protein interaction networks were generated postulating interesting candidates for further studies, including Pr1C, based on possible functional interactions. On the basis of these results, we propose that M. anisopliae is degrading host components and actively secreting proteins to manage the physiology of the host. Interestingly, the secretion of these factors occurs in the absence of a host response. The findings presented here are an important step in understanding the host-pathogen interaction and developing more efficient biocontrol of D. peruvianus by M. anisopliae.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus