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Cell-intrinsic mechanisms of temperature compensation in a grasshopper sensory receptor neuron.

Roemschied FA, Eberhard MJ, Schleimer JH, Ronacher B, Schreiber S - Elife (2014)

Bottom Line: The nervous systems of poikilothermic animals must have evolved mechanisms enabling them to retain their functionality under varying temperatures.Auditory receptor neurons of grasshoppers respond to sound in a surprisingly temperature-compensated manner: firing rates depend moderately on temperature, with average Q10 values around 1.5.Remarkably, this type of temperature compensation need not come at an additional metabolic cost of spike generation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Theoretical Biology, Department of Biology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

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Temperature compensation in the Traub-Miles model.Temperature compensation of spike generation is also possible in a structurally different Traub-Miles model despite a realistic temperature dependence of its conductances (). Shown are the model at reference temperature (32°C for this model, black curve), and the model heated up by 10°C (red curve) or cooled down by 10°C (blue curve), with temperature parameters that minimize the RMSD of the corresponding f-I curves within the physiologically realistic range (identical to that explored for the Connor-Stevens model with peak conductances () and transition rates of the (in-) activation variables ). Optimal parameters minimizing the RMSD were identified by a genetic algorithm. Relative changes in firing rate were on the order of those observed experimentally ( for the red curve and  for the blue curve).DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02078.008
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fig2s1: Temperature compensation in the Traub-Miles model.Temperature compensation of spike generation is also possible in a structurally different Traub-Miles model despite a realistic temperature dependence of its conductances (). Shown are the model at reference temperature (32°C for this model, black curve), and the model heated up by 10°C (red curve) or cooled down by 10°C (blue curve), with temperature parameters that minimize the RMSD of the corresponding f-I curves within the physiologically realistic range (identical to that explored for the Connor-Stevens model with peak conductances () and transition rates of the (in-) activation variables ). Optimal parameters minimizing the RMSD were identified by a genetic algorithm. Relative changes in firing rate were on the order of those observed experimentally ( for the red curve and for the blue curve).DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02078.008

Mentions: To confirm that the results do not strongly depend on the specific choice of peak conductances in the Connor–Stevens model, we tested 24 alternative models with changes of ± 20% in the peak conductances of sodium, both potassium, and leak channels. The impact ranking across those models was highly similar to the ranking in the original Connor–Stevens model (Figure 2E) and we conclude that our results are robust. Moreover, we note that our results are not unique to the Connor–Stevens model. An analysis of a structurally different Traub–Miles model (Traub et al., 1991; Benda, 2002) showed that an equally low temperature dependence is possible (Figure 2—figure supplement 1).


Cell-intrinsic mechanisms of temperature compensation in a grasshopper sensory receptor neuron.

Roemschied FA, Eberhard MJ, Schleimer JH, Ronacher B, Schreiber S - Elife (2014)

Temperature compensation in the Traub-Miles model.Temperature compensation of spike generation is also possible in a structurally different Traub-Miles model despite a realistic temperature dependence of its conductances (). Shown are the model at reference temperature (32°C for this model, black curve), and the model heated up by 10°C (red curve) or cooled down by 10°C (blue curve), with temperature parameters that minimize the RMSD of the corresponding f-I curves within the physiologically realistic range (identical to that explored for the Connor-Stevens model with peak conductances () and transition rates of the (in-) activation variables ). Optimal parameters minimizing the RMSD were identified by a genetic algorithm. Relative changes in firing rate were on the order of those observed experimentally ( for the red curve and  for the blue curve).DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02078.008
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4012639&req=5

fig2s1: Temperature compensation in the Traub-Miles model.Temperature compensation of spike generation is also possible in a structurally different Traub-Miles model despite a realistic temperature dependence of its conductances (). Shown are the model at reference temperature (32°C for this model, black curve), and the model heated up by 10°C (red curve) or cooled down by 10°C (blue curve), with temperature parameters that minimize the RMSD of the corresponding f-I curves within the physiologically realistic range (identical to that explored for the Connor-Stevens model with peak conductances () and transition rates of the (in-) activation variables ). Optimal parameters minimizing the RMSD were identified by a genetic algorithm. Relative changes in firing rate were on the order of those observed experimentally ( for the red curve and for the blue curve).DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02078.008
Mentions: To confirm that the results do not strongly depend on the specific choice of peak conductances in the Connor–Stevens model, we tested 24 alternative models with changes of ± 20% in the peak conductances of sodium, both potassium, and leak channels. The impact ranking across those models was highly similar to the ranking in the original Connor–Stevens model (Figure 2E) and we conclude that our results are robust. Moreover, we note that our results are not unique to the Connor–Stevens model. An analysis of a structurally different Traub–Miles model (Traub et al., 1991; Benda, 2002) showed that an equally low temperature dependence is possible (Figure 2—figure supplement 1).

Bottom Line: The nervous systems of poikilothermic animals must have evolved mechanisms enabling them to retain their functionality under varying temperatures.Auditory receptor neurons of grasshoppers respond to sound in a surprisingly temperature-compensated manner: firing rates depend moderately on temperature, with average Q10 values around 1.5.Remarkably, this type of temperature compensation need not come at an additional metabolic cost of spike generation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Theoretical Biology, Department of Biology, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus