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Altered resting-state functional connectivity of striatal-thalamic circuit in bipolar disorder.

Teng S, Lu CF, Wang PS, Li CT, Tu PC, Hung CI, Su TP, Wu YT - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: The selected functional connectivities associated with the striatal-thalamic circuit and default mode network (DMN) were compared between bipolar patients and healthy controls.Significantly decreased connectivity in the striatal-thalamic circuit and between the striatal regions and the middle and posterior cingulate cortex was observed in the bipolar patients.No significant changes of connectivity related to the frontal regions in the DMN were observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC; Brain Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC.

ABSTRACT
Bipolar disorder is characterized by internally affective fluctuations. The abnormality of inherently mental state can be assessed using resting-state fMRI data without producing task-induced biases. In this study, we hypothesized that the resting-state connectivity related to the frontal, striatal, and thalamic regions, which were associated with mood regulations and cognitive functions, can be altered for bipolar disorder. We used the Pearson's correlation coefficients to estimate functional connectivity followed by the hierarchical modular analysis to categorize the resting-state functional regions of interest (ROIs). The selected functional connectivities associated with the striatal-thalamic circuit and default mode network (DMN) were compared between bipolar patients and healthy controls. Significantly decreased connectivity in the striatal-thalamic circuit and between the striatal regions and the middle and posterior cingulate cortex was observed in the bipolar patients. We also observed that the bipolar patients exhibited significantly increased connectivity between the thalamic regions and the parahippocampus. No significant changes of connectivity related to the frontal regions in the DMN were observed. The changed resting-state connectivity related to the striatal-thalamic circuit might be an inherent basis for the altered emotional and cognitive processing in the bipolar patients.

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The mean functional connectivity across all participants.(a) The mean 90  90 correlation matrix across all participants. The anatomical locations of 90 ROIs are listed in the Table S1. The warm colors represent the positive correlations whereas the cool colors represent the negative correlations between ROIs. (b) The modular structure of brain functional connectivity across all participants. This modular pattern is obtained by reordering regions in the mean correlation matrix according to maximizing the strength of connectivity close to the main diagonal of the matrix. Module 6 consisted of 3 striatal regions and 8 thalamus subregions forming the striatal-thalamic circuit. Module 3 consisted of 9 medial frontal regions, 1 temporal region, 7 parietal regions, 1 posterior cingulate cortex and 1 occipital region forming the DMN. The details of the modular structure are listed in Table S2.
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pone-0096422-g001: The mean functional connectivity across all participants.(a) The mean 90 90 correlation matrix across all participants. The anatomical locations of 90 ROIs are listed in the Table S1. The warm colors represent the positive correlations whereas the cool colors represent the negative correlations between ROIs. (b) The modular structure of brain functional connectivity across all participants. This modular pattern is obtained by reordering regions in the mean correlation matrix according to maximizing the strength of connectivity close to the main diagonal of the matrix. Module 6 consisted of 3 striatal regions and 8 thalamus subregions forming the striatal-thalamic circuit. Module 3 consisted of 9 medial frontal regions, 1 temporal region, 7 parietal regions, 1 posterior cingulate cortex and 1 occipital region forming the DMN. The details of the modular structure are listed in Table S2.

Mentions: Based on the results of the hierarchical modular analysis, the 90 ROIs were segregated into 10 modules. We reordered the regions in the mean correlation matrix among all of the participants (Figure 1a) to illustrate the modular structure in which the strength of connectivity near the diagonal of the matrix was strong (Figure 1b). Eleven ROIs, including 3 striatal regions (the ventral and dorsal caudate and dorsal putamen) and 8 thalamic subregions (the anterior, mediodorsal, ventral posterolateral, and pulvinar thalamus) were clustered in one module, namely, the striatal-thalamic circuit (Figure 1b, Module 6). Nineteen ROIs, including 9 medial frontal regions, 1 temporal region, 7 parietal regions, 1 posterior cingulate cortex and 1 occipital region were clustered into one module forming the DMN (Figure 1b, Module 3). Because the frontal, striatal, and thalamic regions were separated into two modules, namely, the striatal-thalamic circuit and the DMN, we specified 2 sets of seed ROIs (11 seed ROIs for the striatal-thalamic circuit and 19 seed ROIs for the DMN) and performed one-sample t test separately. The 2 ROIs of the left middle temporal gyrus (Module 1) and the pons (Module 5) were removed in the subsequent statistical analysis because they were isolated from the modular structure. The details of the modular structure are listed in Table S2.


Altered resting-state functional connectivity of striatal-thalamic circuit in bipolar disorder.

Teng S, Lu CF, Wang PS, Li CT, Tu PC, Hung CI, Su TP, Wu YT - PLoS ONE (2014)

The mean functional connectivity across all participants.(a) The mean 90  90 correlation matrix across all participants. The anatomical locations of 90 ROIs are listed in the Table S1. The warm colors represent the positive correlations whereas the cool colors represent the negative correlations between ROIs. (b) The modular structure of brain functional connectivity across all participants. This modular pattern is obtained by reordering regions in the mean correlation matrix according to maximizing the strength of connectivity close to the main diagonal of the matrix. Module 6 consisted of 3 striatal regions and 8 thalamus subregions forming the striatal-thalamic circuit. Module 3 consisted of 9 medial frontal regions, 1 temporal region, 7 parietal regions, 1 posterior cingulate cortex and 1 occipital region forming the DMN. The details of the modular structure are listed in Table S2.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4008631&req=5

pone-0096422-g001: The mean functional connectivity across all participants.(a) The mean 90 90 correlation matrix across all participants. The anatomical locations of 90 ROIs are listed in the Table S1. The warm colors represent the positive correlations whereas the cool colors represent the negative correlations between ROIs. (b) The modular structure of brain functional connectivity across all participants. This modular pattern is obtained by reordering regions in the mean correlation matrix according to maximizing the strength of connectivity close to the main diagonal of the matrix. Module 6 consisted of 3 striatal regions and 8 thalamus subregions forming the striatal-thalamic circuit. Module 3 consisted of 9 medial frontal regions, 1 temporal region, 7 parietal regions, 1 posterior cingulate cortex and 1 occipital region forming the DMN. The details of the modular structure are listed in Table S2.
Mentions: Based on the results of the hierarchical modular analysis, the 90 ROIs were segregated into 10 modules. We reordered the regions in the mean correlation matrix among all of the participants (Figure 1a) to illustrate the modular structure in which the strength of connectivity near the diagonal of the matrix was strong (Figure 1b). Eleven ROIs, including 3 striatal regions (the ventral and dorsal caudate and dorsal putamen) and 8 thalamic subregions (the anterior, mediodorsal, ventral posterolateral, and pulvinar thalamus) were clustered in one module, namely, the striatal-thalamic circuit (Figure 1b, Module 6). Nineteen ROIs, including 9 medial frontal regions, 1 temporal region, 7 parietal regions, 1 posterior cingulate cortex and 1 occipital region were clustered into one module forming the DMN (Figure 1b, Module 3). Because the frontal, striatal, and thalamic regions were separated into two modules, namely, the striatal-thalamic circuit and the DMN, we specified 2 sets of seed ROIs (11 seed ROIs for the striatal-thalamic circuit and 19 seed ROIs for the DMN) and performed one-sample t test separately. The 2 ROIs of the left middle temporal gyrus (Module 1) and the pons (Module 5) were removed in the subsequent statistical analysis because they were isolated from the modular structure. The details of the modular structure are listed in Table S2.

Bottom Line: The selected functional connectivities associated with the striatal-thalamic circuit and default mode network (DMN) were compared between bipolar patients and healthy controls.Significantly decreased connectivity in the striatal-thalamic circuit and between the striatal regions and the middle and posterior cingulate cortex was observed in the bipolar patients.No significant changes of connectivity related to the frontal regions in the DMN were observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC; Brain Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC.

ABSTRACT
Bipolar disorder is characterized by internally affective fluctuations. The abnormality of inherently mental state can be assessed using resting-state fMRI data without producing task-induced biases. In this study, we hypothesized that the resting-state connectivity related to the frontal, striatal, and thalamic regions, which were associated with mood regulations and cognitive functions, can be altered for bipolar disorder. We used the Pearson's correlation coefficients to estimate functional connectivity followed by the hierarchical modular analysis to categorize the resting-state functional regions of interest (ROIs). The selected functional connectivities associated with the striatal-thalamic circuit and default mode network (DMN) were compared between bipolar patients and healthy controls. Significantly decreased connectivity in the striatal-thalamic circuit and between the striatal regions and the middle and posterior cingulate cortex was observed in the bipolar patients. We also observed that the bipolar patients exhibited significantly increased connectivity between the thalamic regions and the parahippocampus. No significant changes of connectivity related to the frontal regions in the DMN were observed. The changed resting-state connectivity related to the striatal-thalamic circuit might be an inherent basis for the altered emotional and cognitive processing in the bipolar patients.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus