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Timing, frequency and environmental conditions associated with mainstem-tributary movement by a lowland river fish, golden perch (Macquaria ambigua).

Koster WM, Dawson DR, O'Mahony DJ, Moloney PD, Crook DA - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: The movements of fish from the mainstem into the tributary were irregular and did not appear to be associated with spawning.The findings show that golden perch moved freely across the mainstem-tributary interface.This demonstrates the need to consider the spatial, behavioural and demographic interdependencies of aquatic fauna across geographic management units such as rivers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Arthur Rylah Institute for Environmental Research, Department of Environment and Primary Industries, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia; School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Victoria, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Tributary and mainstem connections represent important links for the movement of fish and other biota throughout river networks. We investigated the timing, frequency and environmental conditions associated with movements by adult golden perch (Macquaria ambigua) between the mainstem of the mid-Murray River and a tributary, the Goulburn River, in south-eastern Australia, using acoustic telemetry over four years (2007-2011). Fish were tagged and released in autumn 2007-2009 in the mid-Murray (n = 42) and lower Goulburn (n = 37) rivers within 3-6 km of the mid-Murray-lower Goulburn junction. 38% of tagged fish undertook mainstem-tributary movements, characterised mostly by temporary occupation followed by return of fish to the original capture river. Approximately 10% of tagged fish exhibited longer-term shifts between the mainstem and tributary. Movement of fish from the tributary into the mainstem occurred primarily during the spawning season and in some years coincided with the presence of golden perch eggs/larvae in drift samples in the mainstem. Many of the tributary-to-mainstem movements occurred during or soon after changes in flow. The movements of fish from the mainstem into the tributary were irregular and did not appear to be associated with spawning. The findings show that golden perch moved freely across the mainstem-tributary interface. This demonstrates the need to consider the spatial, behavioural and demographic interdependencies of aquatic fauna across geographic management units such as rivers.

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Times during which tagged fish were detected in mainstem, tributary and junction locations.Times (filled bars) during which fish tagged in the Murray River were detected in the Murray River >2 km from junction (dark grey bar), Murray River within 2 km of junction (black bar), and Goulburn River (light grey bar) (A), and times during which fish tagged in the Goulburn River were detected in the Goulburn River (light grey bar), Murray River within 2 km of junction (black bar) and Murray River >2 km from junction (dark grey bar) (B). Red ‘X’ indicates fish reported as caught and kept by angler. Numbers refer to individual tagged fish. Fish were tagged on three separate occasions (April 2007, April 2008, April 2009). Aqua vertical bar represents spawning season.
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pone-0096044-g002: Times during which tagged fish were detected in mainstem, tributary and junction locations.Times (filled bars) during which fish tagged in the Murray River were detected in the Murray River >2 km from junction (dark grey bar), Murray River within 2 km of junction (black bar), and Goulburn River (light grey bar) (A), and times during which fish tagged in the Goulburn River were detected in the Goulburn River (light grey bar), Murray River within 2 km of junction (black bar) and Murray River >2 km from junction (dark grey bar) (B). Red ‘X’ indicates fish reported as caught and kept by angler. Numbers refer to individual tagged fish. Fish were tagged on three separate occasions (April 2007, April 2008, April 2009). Aqua vertical bar represents spawning season.

Mentions: Of the 79 golden perch tagged during the study, 68 were detected by the listening stations and three were reported by anglers as caught in the Goulburn River and retained (Table 1, Fig. 2). About one quarter (11 out of 42) of fish tagged in the Murray River moved into the Goulburn River (mean TL 431 mm, range 320–520 mm), and just over half (20 out of 37) of fish tagged in the Goulburn River moved into the Murray River (mean TL 433 mm, range 340–520 mm) (Fig. 2, 3). The size range of fish moving between locations was similar to the overall size range of fish tagged (mean TL 426 mm, range 315–580 mm). Most (24 out of 31) individuals that made mainstem–tributary movements returned to the river from which they were originally collected, although seven fish (Murray n = 3, Goulburn n = 4) did not return to their capture river during the study (Fig. 2, 3).


Timing, frequency and environmental conditions associated with mainstem-tributary movement by a lowland river fish, golden perch (Macquaria ambigua).

Koster WM, Dawson DR, O'Mahony DJ, Moloney PD, Crook DA - PLoS ONE (2014)

Times during which tagged fish were detected in mainstem, tributary and junction locations.Times (filled bars) during which fish tagged in the Murray River were detected in the Murray River >2 km from junction (dark grey bar), Murray River within 2 km of junction (black bar), and Goulburn River (light grey bar) (A), and times during which fish tagged in the Goulburn River were detected in the Goulburn River (light grey bar), Murray River within 2 km of junction (black bar) and Murray River >2 km from junction (dark grey bar) (B). Red ‘X’ indicates fish reported as caught and kept by angler. Numbers refer to individual tagged fish. Fish were tagged on three separate occasions (April 2007, April 2008, April 2009). Aqua vertical bar represents spawning season.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4008613&req=5

pone-0096044-g002: Times during which tagged fish were detected in mainstem, tributary and junction locations.Times (filled bars) during which fish tagged in the Murray River were detected in the Murray River >2 km from junction (dark grey bar), Murray River within 2 km of junction (black bar), and Goulburn River (light grey bar) (A), and times during which fish tagged in the Goulburn River were detected in the Goulburn River (light grey bar), Murray River within 2 km of junction (black bar) and Murray River >2 km from junction (dark grey bar) (B). Red ‘X’ indicates fish reported as caught and kept by angler. Numbers refer to individual tagged fish. Fish were tagged on three separate occasions (April 2007, April 2008, April 2009). Aqua vertical bar represents spawning season.
Mentions: Of the 79 golden perch tagged during the study, 68 were detected by the listening stations and three were reported by anglers as caught in the Goulburn River and retained (Table 1, Fig. 2). About one quarter (11 out of 42) of fish tagged in the Murray River moved into the Goulburn River (mean TL 431 mm, range 320–520 mm), and just over half (20 out of 37) of fish tagged in the Goulburn River moved into the Murray River (mean TL 433 mm, range 340–520 mm) (Fig. 2, 3). The size range of fish moving between locations was similar to the overall size range of fish tagged (mean TL 426 mm, range 315–580 mm). Most (24 out of 31) individuals that made mainstem–tributary movements returned to the river from which they were originally collected, although seven fish (Murray n = 3, Goulburn n = 4) did not return to their capture river during the study (Fig. 2, 3).

Bottom Line: The movements of fish from the mainstem into the tributary were irregular and did not appear to be associated with spawning.The findings show that golden perch moved freely across the mainstem-tributary interface.This demonstrates the need to consider the spatial, behavioural and demographic interdependencies of aquatic fauna across geographic management units such as rivers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Arthur Rylah Institute for Environmental Research, Department of Environment and Primary Industries, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia; School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Warrnambool, Victoria, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Tributary and mainstem connections represent important links for the movement of fish and other biota throughout river networks. We investigated the timing, frequency and environmental conditions associated with movements by adult golden perch (Macquaria ambigua) between the mainstem of the mid-Murray River and a tributary, the Goulburn River, in south-eastern Australia, using acoustic telemetry over four years (2007-2011). Fish were tagged and released in autumn 2007-2009 in the mid-Murray (n = 42) and lower Goulburn (n = 37) rivers within 3-6 km of the mid-Murray-lower Goulburn junction. 38% of tagged fish undertook mainstem-tributary movements, characterised mostly by temporary occupation followed by return of fish to the original capture river. Approximately 10% of tagged fish exhibited longer-term shifts between the mainstem and tributary. Movement of fish from the tributary into the mainstem occurred primarily during the spawning season and in some years coincided with the presence of golden perch eggs/larvae in drift samples in the mainstem. Many of the tributary-to-mainstem movements occurred during or soon after changes in flow. The movements of fish from the mainstem into the tributary were irregular and did not appear to be associated with spawning. The findings show that golden perch moved freely across the mainstem-tributary interface. This demonstrates the need to consider the spatial, behavioural and demographic interdependencies of aquatic fauna across geographic management units such as rivers.

Show MeSH