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Receipt of prescribed controlled substances by adolescents and young adults prior to presenting for opiate dependence treatment.

Matson SC, Bentley C, Hughes Dughman V, Bonny AE - J Addict (2013)

Bottom Line: Results.Conclusions.A subset of opiate-dependent youth had filled multiple opiate/narcotic prescriptions providing some evidence that physician-provided prescriptions may be a source of opiate abuse or diversion for a minority of opiate-dependent adolescents and young adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA ; Division of Adolescent Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Drive, G353 Timken Hall, Columbus, OH 43205-2664, USA.

ABSTRACT
Purpose. The objective of this study was to document the number of controlled substance prescriptions filled by adolescents and young adult patients in the 2 years prior to presentation for opiate dependence treatment. Methods. Opiate-dependent youth (N = 125) presenting to our Medication-Assisted Treatment for Addiction program from January 1, 2008 to June 30, 2010 were identified via electronic medical record. Subjects were further classified based on their opiate use as dependent to heroin-only, prescription (Rx) opiate-only, or combined heroin + Rx opiate only. The Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System (OARRS) was used to identify each subject's controlled substance prescription history. Negative binomial regression was used to examine the relationships between patient characteristics and the total number of prescriptions filled. Results. Twenty-five percent of subjects had filled ≥6 prescriptions, and 15% had filled ≥11 prescriptions. The mean number of prescriptions filled was 5 (range: 0-59). Thirteen percent had filled ≥6 opiate/narcotic prescriptions, and 8% had filled ≥11 prescriptions. Conclusions. A subset of opiate-dependent youth had filled multiple opiate/narcotic prescriptions providing some evidence that physician-provided prescriptions may be a source of opiate abuse or diversion for a minority of opiate-dependent adolescents and young adults.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of total number of prescriptions for all controlled medications and opiate/narcotics filled in the 2 years prior to presentation for outpatient medication-assisted treatment for opioid dependence.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Distribution of total number of prescriptions for all controlled medications and opiate/narcotics filled in the 2 years prior to presentation for outpatient medication-assisted treatment for opioid dependence.

Mentions: Two out of three patients had filled at least one prescription for controlled substances in the 2 years prior to intake, 25% had filled ≥6 prescriptions, and 15% had filled ≥11 prescriptions (Figure 1). The mean number of prescriptions filled was 5.3 (range: 0–59). The average number of pills or capsules dispensed was 194 pills (range: 0–2269). Examination of specific drug classes found that 54% of the subjects had filled a prescription for an opiate/narcotic, 13% had filled ≥6 opiate/narcotic prescriptions, and 8% had filled ≥11 prescriptions (Figure 1). Among opiate/narcotic prescriptions, specific medications prescribed to our study sample were as follows: hydrocodone/acetaminophen (43% of subjects); oxycodone (19% of subjects); codeine/acetaminophen (17% of subjects); codeine/cough formulation (3% of subjects); and meperidine (2% of subjects). Twenty-five percent of subjects filled a prescription for an analgesic, 18% for a benzodiazepine, and 13% for a stimulant.


Receipt of prescribed controlled substances by adolescents and young adults prior to presenting for opiate dependence treatment.

Matson SC, Bentley C, Hughes Dughman V, Bonny AE - J Addict (2013)

Distribution of total number of prescriptions for all controlled medications and opiate/narcotics filled in the 2 years prior to presentation for outpatient medication-assisted treatment for opioid dependence.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4008407&req=5

fig1: Distribution of total number of prescriptions for all controlled medications and opiate/narcotics filled in the 2 years prior to presentation for outpatient medication-assisted treatment for opioid dependence.
Mentions: Two out of three patients had filled at least one prescription for controlled substances in the 2 years prior to intake, 25% had filled ≥6 prescriptions, and 15% had filled ≥11 prescriptions (Figure 1). The mean number of prescriptions filled was 5.3 (range: 0–59). The average number of pills or capsules dispensed was 194 pills (range: 0–2269). Examination of specific drug classes found that 54% of the subjects had filled a prescription for an opiate/narcotic, 13% had filled ≥6 opiate/narcotic prescriptions, and 8% had filled ≥11 prescriptions (Figure 1). Among opiate/narcotic prescriptions, specific medications prescribed to our study sample were as follows: hydrocodone/acetaminophen (43% of subjects); oxycodone (19% of subjects); codeine/acetaminophen (17% of subjects); codeine/cough formulation (3% of subjects); and meperidine (2% of subjects). Twenty-five percent of subjects filled a prescription for an analgesic, 18% for a benzodiazepine, and 13% for a stimulant.

Bottom Line: Results.Conclusions.A subset of opiate-dependent youth had filled multiple opiate/narcotic prescriptions providing some evidence that physician-provided prescriptions may be a source of opiate abuse or diversion for a minority of opiate-dependent adolescents and young adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH, USA ; Division of Adolescent Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital, 700 Children's Drive, G353 Timken Hall, Columbus, OH 43205-2664, USA.

ABSTRACT
Purpose. The objective of this study was to document the number of controlled substance prescriptions filled by adolescents and young adult patients in the 2 years prior to presentation for opiate dependence treatment. Methods. Opiate-dependent youth (N = 125) presenting to our Medication-Assisted Treatment for Addiction program from January 1, 2008 to June 30, 2010 were identified via electronic medical record. Subjects were further classified based on their opiate use as dependent to heroin-only, prescription (Rx) opiate-only, or combined heroin + Rx opiate only. The Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System (OARRS) was used to identify each subject's controlled substance prescription history. Negative binomial regression was used to examine the relationships between patient characteristics and the total number of prescriptions filled. Results. Twenty-five percent of subjects had filled ≥6 prescriptions, and 15% had filled ≥11 prescriptions. The mean number of prescriptions filled was 5 (range: 0-59). Thirteen percent had filled ≥6 opiate/narcotic prescriptions, and 8% had filled ≥11 prescriptions. Conclusions. A subset of opiate-dependent youth had filled multiple opiate/narcotic prescriptions providing some evidence that physician-provided prescriptions may be a source of opiate abuse or diversion for a minority of opiate-dependent adolescents and young adults.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus