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Impetigo - review.

Pereira LB - An Bras Dermatol (2014 Mar-Apr)

Bottom Line: Impetigo is a common cutaneous infection that is especially prevalent in children.Currently, the most frequently isolated pathogen is S. aureus.This article discusses the microbiologic and virulence factors of group A β-hemolytic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus, clinical characteristics, complications, as well as the approach to diagnosis and management of impetigo.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Minas Gerais Federal University, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Impetigo is a common cutaneous infection that is especially prevalent in children. Historically, impetigo is caused by either group A β-hemolytic streptococci or Staphylococcus aureus. Currently, the most frequently isolated pathogen is S. aureus. This article discusses the microbiologic and virulence factors of group A β-hemolytic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus, clinical characteristics, complications, as well as the approach to diagnosis and management of impetigo. Topical agents for impetigo therapy are reviewed.

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Bullous impetigo in diaper area
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f03: Bullous impetigo in diaper area

Mentions: Bullous impetigo starts with smaller vesicles, which become flaccid blisters, measuringup to 2 cm in diameter, initially with clear content that later becomes purulent (Figure 1). The roof of the blister ruptures easily,revealing an erythematous, shiny and wet basis. The remainder of the roof can be seen asa collarette at the periphery and the confluence of lesions promotes the appearance ofpolycyclic figures (Figures 2 and 3). Bullous impetigo occurs most commonly inintertriginous regions such as the diaper area, axillae and neck, although any cutaneousarea can be affected, including palms and soles (Figures1 and 2).1,13 Regionalenlarged lymph nodes are usually absent. It is particularly important in the neonatalperiod, starting usually after the second week of life, although it can be present atbirth in case of premature membranes rupture. Bullous impetigo is most common amongchildren aged two to five years.13,15-17


Impetigo - review.

Pereira LB - An Bras Dermatol (2014 Mar-Apr)

Bullous impetigo in diaper area
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4008061&req=5

f03: Bullous impetigo in diaper area
Mentions: Bullous impetigo starts with smaller vesicles, which become flaccid blisters, measuringup to 2 cm in diameter, initially with clear content that later becomes purulent (Figure 1). The roof of the blister ruptures easily,revealing an erythematous, shiny and wet basis. The remainder of the roof can be seen asa collarette at the periphery and the confluence of lesions promotes the appearance ofpolycyclic figures (Figures 2 and 3). Bullous impetigo occurs most commonly inintertriginous regions such as the diaper area, axillae and neck, although any cutaneousarea can be affected, including palms and soles (Figures1 and 2).1,13 Regionalenlarged lymph nodes are usually absent. It is particularly important in the neonatalperiod, starting usually after the second week of life, although it can be present atbirth in case of premature membranes rupture. Bullous impetigo is most common amongchildren aged two to five years.13,15-17

Bottom Line: Impetigo is a common cutaneous infection that is especially prevalent in children.Currently, the most frequently isolated pathogen is S. aureus.This article discusses the microbiologic and virulence factors of group A β-hemolytic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus, clinical characteristics, complications, as well as the approach to diagnosis and management of impetigo.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Minas Gerais Federal University, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Impetigo is a common cutaneous infection that is especially prevalent in children. Historically, impetigo is caused by either group A β-hemolytic streptococci or Staphylococcus aureus. Currently, the most frequently isolated pathogen is S. aureus. This article discusses the microbiologic and virulence factors of group A β-hemolytic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus, clinical characteristics, complications, as well as the approach to diagnosis and management of impetigo. Topical agents for impetigo therapy are reviewed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus