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Association of resistin polymorphism, its serum levels and prevalence of stroke in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients.

Nakashima E, Watarai A, Tsukahara T, Hamada Y, Naruse K, Kamiya H, Kato J, Kato N, Tomita M, Oiso Y, Nakamura J - J Diabetes Investig (2010)

Bottom Line: Aims/Introduction:  Resistin, an inflammatory cytokine, might be involved in the development of atherosclerosis.In multiple logistic regression analysis, serum resistin levels was an independent risk marker of stroke even after adjusted by RETN polymorphism, age, sex, body mass index, HbA1c, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, creatinine, history of coronary heart disease, treatment of insulin, sulfonylurea and aspirin (odds ratio 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.73, P = 0.039).Patients with the GG genotype and high resistin levels showed the highest odds ratio, 5.69 (95% CI 1.24-26.1), compared with the group with CC and low levels.   The results suggest that serum resistin levels might be a good marker of susceptibility to stroke as well as RETN polymorphism. (J Diabetes Invest, doi: 10.1111/j.2040-1124.00040.x, 2010).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Diabetes Center, Chubu Rosai Hospital, Japan Labour Health and Welfare Organization ; Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Aims/Introduction:  Resistin, an inflammatory cytokine, might be involved in the development of atherosclerosis. In a recent paper, we showed that resistin polymorphism might be a risk marker for stroke susceptibility in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. We tested whether the serum resistin levels might be also a risk marker of stroke independently from RETN polymorphism.

Materials and methods:   Type 2 diabetic outpatients from our hospitals were enrolled. Patients (n = 89) with a history of coronary heart disease and stroke, and randomly selected controls (n = 178) matched for sex and age, but without a history of coronary heart disease and stroke, were examined for polymorphism -420 (C>G) and cytokines levels.

Results:   Serum resistin levels were significantly higher in patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) than in those without CVD (P = 0.024), and were highest in patients with stroke among the CVD. In multiple logistic regression analysis, serum resistin levels was an independent risk marker of stroke even after adjusted by RETN polymorphism, age, sex, body mass index, HbA1c, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, creatinine, history of coronary heart disease, treatment of insulin, sulfonylurea and aspirin (odds ratio 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.73, P = 0.039). The enrolled patients were divided by their serum resistin levels (high or low group) and their genotypes (CC, CG, GG at -420) into six groups. Patients with the GG genotype and high resistin levels showed the highest odds ratio, 5.69 (95% CI 1.24-26.1), compared with the group with CC and low levels.

Conclusions:   The results suggest that serum resistin levels might be a good marker of susceptibility to stroke as well as RETN polymorphism. (J Diabetes Invest, doi: 10.1111/j.2040-1124.00040.x, 2010).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

 (a) The resistin concentration (ng/mL) in control, total cardiovascular diseases (CVD) (coronary heart disease [CHD] + stroke) and each CVD. Box plots show median, interquartile range and non‐outlier range. Extreme values are excluded from the box plots. (b) Odds ratio for stroke according to the combination of RETN genotype (‐420C/G) and resistin levels (high or low) in multivariate logistic‐regression analysis. The enrolled patients were divided by their serum resistin concentrations at median (high or low) and their genotypes (CC, CG, GG) into six groups. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, serum levels of triglycerides, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, C‐reactive protein and creatinine, the multivariate logistic‐regression analysis were made and each odds ratio against the CC + Low group was calculated. Right column shows odds ratio (confidence intervals).
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f1:  (a) The resistin concentration (ng/mL) in control, total cardiovascular diseases (CVD) (coronary heart disease [CHD] + stroke) and each CVD. Box plots show median, interquartile range and non‐outlier range. Extreme values are excluded from the box plots. (b) Odds ratio for stroke according to the combination of RETN genotype (‐420C/G) and resistin levels (high or low) in multivariate logistic‐regression analysis. The enrolled patients were divided by their serum resistin concentrations at median (high or low) and their genotypes (CC, CG, GG) into six groups. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, serum levels of triglycerides, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, C‐reactive protein and creatinine, the multivariate logistic‐regression analysis were made and each odds ratio against the CC + Low group was calculated. Right column shows odds ratio (confidence intervals).

Mentions: The baseline clinical characteristics of the study subjects are presented according to the presence or absence of CVD (Table 1). Cases had significantly higher TG, creatinine, resistin levels and CRP than controls. Other anthropometric data did not show any significant differences between the two groups. Serum resistin levels were significantly higher in patients with CVD than in those without CVD (P = 0.024). However, the levels of serum resistin were highest in patients with stroke among the CVD (stroke 16.5 [8.1–28.3] vs control, P = 0.007) (Figure 1a). The serum resistin levels had significantly univariate correlations with the levels of creatinine and CRP, but not with other anthropometric variables (Table 2).


Association of resistin polymorphism, its serum levels and prevalence of stroke in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients.

Nakashima E, Watarai A, Tsukahara T, Hamada Y, Naruse K, Kamiya H, Kato J, Kato N, Tomita M, Oiso Y, Nakamura J - J Diabetes Investig (2010)

 (a) The resistin concentration (ng/mL) in control, total cardiovascular diseases (CVD) (coronary heart disease [CHD] + stroke) and each CVD. Box plots show median, interquartile range and non‐outlier range. Extreme values are excluded from the box plots. (b) Odds ratio for stroke according to the combination of RETN genotype (‐420C/G) and resistin levels (high or low) in multivariate logistic‐regression analysis. The enrolled patients were divided by their serum resistin concentrations at median (high or low) and their genotypes (CC, CG, GG) into six groups. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, serum levels of triglycerides, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, C‐reactive protein and creatinine, the multivariate logistic‐regression analysis were made and each odds ratio against the CC + Low group was calculated. Right column shows odds ratio (confidence intervals).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4008008&req=5

f1:  (a) The resistin concentration (ng/mL) in control, total cardiovascular diseases (CVD) (coronary heart disease [CHD] + stroke) and each CVD. Box plots show median, interquartile range and non‐outlier range. Extreme values are excluded from the box plots. (b) Odds ratio for stroke according to the combination of RETN genotype (‐420C/G) and resistin levels (high or low) in multivariate logistic‐regression analysis. The enrolled patients were divided by their serum resistin concentrations at median (high or low) and their genotypes (CC, CG, GG) into six groups. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, serum levels of triglycerides, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, C‐reactive protein and creatinine, the multivariate logistic‐regression analysis were made and each odds ratio against the CC + Low group was calculated. Right column shows odds ratio (confidence intervals).
Mentions: The baseline clinical characteristics of the study subjects are presented according to the presence or absence of CVD (Table 1). Cases had significantly higher TG, creatinine, resistin levels and CRP than controls. Other anthropometric data did not show any significant differences between the two groups. Serum resistin levels were significantly higher in patients with CVD than in those without CVD (P = 0.024). However, the levels of serum resistin were highest in patients with stroke among the CVD (stroke 16.5 [8.1–28.3] vs control, P = 0.007) (Figure 1a). The serum resistin levels had significantly univariate correlations with the levels of creatinine and CRP, but not with other anthropometric variables (Table 2).

Bottom Line: Aims/Introduction:  Resistin, an inflammatory cytokine, might be involved in the development of atherosclerosis.In multiple logistic regression analysis, serum resistin levels was an independent risk marker of stroke even after adjusted by RETN polymorphism, age, sex, body mass index, HbA1c, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, creatinine, history of coronary heart disease, treatment of insulin, sulfonylurea and aspirin (odds ratio 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.73, P = 0.039).Patients with the GG genotype and high resistin levels showed the highest odds ratio, 5.69 (95% CI 1.24-26.1), compared with the group with CC and low levels.   The results suggest that serum resistin levels might be a good marker of susceptibility to stroke as well as RETN polymorphism. (J Diabetes Invest, doi: 10.1111/j.2040-1124.00040.x, 2010).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Diabetes Center, Chubu Rosai Hospital, Japan Labour Health and Welfare Organization ; Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Aims/Introduction:  Resistin, an inflammatory cytokine, might be involved in the development of atherosclerosis. In a recent paper, we showed that resistin polymorphism might be a risk marker for stroke susceptibility in Japanese type 2 diabetic patients. We tested whether the serum resistin levels might be also a risk marker of stroke independently from RETN polymorphism.

Materials and methods:   Type 2 diabetic outpatients from our hospitals were enrolled. Patients (n = 89) with a history of coronary heart disease and stroke, and randomly selected controls (n = 178) matched for sex and age, but without a history of coronary heart disease and stroke, were examined for polymorphism -420 (C>G) and cytokines levels.

Results:   Serum resistin levels were significantly higher in patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) than in those without CVD (P = 0.024), and were highest in patients with stroke among the CVD. In multiple logistic regression analysis, serum resistin levels was an independent risk marker of stroke even after adjusted by RETN polymorphism, age, sex, body mass index, HbA1c, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, creatinine, history of coronary heart disease, treatment of insulin, sulfonylurea and aspirin (odds ratio 1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.73, P = 0.039). The enrolled patients were divided by their serum resistin levels (high or low group) and their genotypes (CC, CG, GG at -420) into six groups. Patients with the GG genotype and high resistin levels showed the highest odds ratio, 5.69 (95% CI 1.24-26.1), compared with the group with CC and low levels.

Conclusions:   The results suggest that serum resistin levels might be a good marker of susceptibility to stroke as well as RETN polymorphism. (J Diabetes Invest, doi: 10.1111/j.2040-1124.00040.x, 2010).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus