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Does cancer risk increase with HbA1c, independent of diabetes?

de Beer JC, Liebenberg L - Br. J. Cancer (2014)

Bottom Line: Hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, inflammation and altered hormonal concentrations are common characteristics between the two diseases and can all be linked to hyperglycaemia.Evidence is also provided that risk is already increased in the pre-diabetic and normal ranges for several cancers.These results merit urgent investigation into the risks and advantages of updating recommendations for stricter glycaemic control in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects, as this could help reduce the risk of cancer incidence and mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Research and Continued Engineering Development, North-West University (Pretoria Campus), Suite No. 91, Private Bag X30, Lynnwood Ridge, Pretoria 0040, South Africa.

ABSTRACT

Background: The risks for several cancer types are increased in people with diabetes. Hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, inflammation and altered hormonal concentrations are common characteristics between the two diseases and can all be linked to hyperglycaemia.

Methods: Here, we use glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) as a biomarker for chronic hyperglycaemia. We explore whether cancer risk increases with HbA1c, independent of diabetes, and, therefore, if risk is already increased below the diabetic HbA1c range, by analysing data from current studies linking HbA1c to risk of several cancer types.

Results: The data reveal that chronic hyperglycaemia correlates with increased cancer risk for a number of cancers, except prostate cancer. Evidence is also provided that risk is already increased in the pre-diabetic and normal ranges for several cancers.

Conclusions: These results merit urgent investigation into the risks and advantages of updating recommendations for stricter glycaemic control in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects, as this could help reduce the risk of cancer incidence and mortality.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between risk for prostate cancer incidence and HbA1c.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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fig7: Relationship between risk for prostate cancer incidence and HbA1c.

Mentions: The statistically significant or border-line significant models that were obtained during the dose–response analyses are shown in Figures 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. The plots are referenced to the lowest HbA1c level in the studies included in each model.


Does cancer risk increase with HbA1c, independent of diabetes?

de Beer JC, Liebenberg L - Br. J. Cancer (2014)

Relationship between risk for prostate cancer incidence and HbA1c.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4007234&req=5

fig7: Relationship between risk for prostate cancer incidence and HbA1c.
Mentions: The statistically significant or border-line significant models that were obtained during the dose–response analyses are shown in Figures 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. The plots are referenced to the lowest HbA1c level in the studies included in each model.

Bottom Line: Hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, inflammation and altered hormonal concentrations are common characteristics between the two diseases and can all be linked to hyperglycaemia.Evidence is also provided that risk is already increased in the pre-diabetic and normal ranges for several cancers.These results merit urgent investigation into the risks and advantages of updating recommendations for stricter glycaemic control in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects, as this could help reduce the risk of cancer incidence and mortality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Research and Continued Engineering Development, North-West University (Pretoria Campus), Suite No. 91, Private Bag X30, Lynnwood Ridge, Pretoria 0040, South Africa.

ABSTRACT

Background: The risks for several cancer types are increased in people with diabetes. Hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, inflammation and altered hormonal concentrations are common characteristics between the two diseases and can all be linked to hyperglycaemia.

Methods: Here, we use glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) as a biomarker for chronic hyperglycaemia. We explore whether cancer risk increases with HbA1c, independent of diabetes, and, therefore, if risk is already increased below the diabetic HbA1c range, by analysing data from current studies linking HbA1c to risk of several cancer types.

Results: The data reveal that chronic hyperglycaemia correlates with increased cancer risk for a number of cancers, except prostate cancer. Evidence is also provided that risk is already increased in the pre-diabetic and normal ranges for several cancers.

Conclusions: These results merit urgent investigation into the risks and advantages of updating recommendations for stricter glycaemic control in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects, as this could help reduce the risk of cancer incidence and mortality.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus