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Margination of micro- and nano-particles in blood flow and its effect on drug delivery.

Müller K, Fedosov DA, Gompper G - Sci Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Particle margination is studied for a wide range of hematocrit values, vessel sizes, and flow rates, using two- and three-dimensional models.The simulations show that the margination properties of particles improve with increasing carrier size.In conclusion, micron-sized ellipsoidal particles are favorable for drug delivery in comparison with sub-micron spherical particles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Theoretical Soft Matter and Biophysics, Institute of Complex Systems and Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Drug delivery by micro- and nano-carriers enables controlled transport of pharmaceuticals to targeted sites. Even though carrier fabrication has made much progress recently, the delivery including controlled particle distribution and adhesion within the body remains a great challenge. The adhesion of carriers is strongly affected by their margination properties (migration toward walls) in the microvasculature. To investigate margination characteristics of carriers of different shapes and sizes and to elucidate the relevant physical mechanisms, we employ mesoscopic hydrodynamic simulations of blood flow. Particle margination is studied for a wide range of hematocrit values, vessel sizes, and flow rates, using two- and three-dimensional models. The simulations show that the margination properties of particles improve with increasing carrier size. Spherical particles yield slightly better margination than ellipsoidal carriers; however, ellipsoidal particles exhibit a slower rotational dynamics near a wall favoring their adhesion. In conclusion, micron-sized ellipsoidal particles are favorable for drug delivery in comparison with sub-micron spherical particles.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Margination for different channel widths.Margination into the potential adhesion layer based on δ = 0.5Dp + 200 nm, for particles with size Dp = 0.3Dr (1.83 μm) and two channel widths (a) W = 10 μm and (b) W = 40 μm.
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f6: Margination for different channel widths.Margination into the potential adhesion layer based on δ = 0.5Dp + 200 nm, for particles with size Dp = 0.3Dr (1.83 μm) and two channel widths (a) W = 10 μm and (b) W = 40 μm.

Mentions: The pronounced dependence of particle margination properties on channel width for the potential adhesion layer is illustrated by a comparison of Fig. 5(b) and Fig. 6. For particles with a size of Dp = 0.3Dr (1.83 μm), particle margination into the potential adhesion layer improves considerably as the channel size decreases due to the much smaller RBCFL thickness in narrow channels. Thus, particle adhesion is expected to be more efficient in small vessels (i.e., capillaries) than in large vessels (i.e., venules and arterioles). Supplementary Fig. S5 supports this observation for particles with Dp = 0.15Dr (0.91 μm). Furthermore, a reduction of margination into the potential adhesion layer with decreasing particle size is found for all channel sizes.


Margination of micro- and nano-particles in blood flow and its effect on drug delivery.

Müller K, Fedosov DA, Gompper G - Sci Rep (2014)

Margination for different channel widths.Margination into the potential adhesion layer based on δ = 0.5Dp + 200 nm, for particles with size Dp = 0.3Dr (1.83 μm) and two channel widths (a) W = 10 μm and (b) W = 40 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4007071&req=5

f6: Margination for different channel widths.Margination into the potential adhesion layer based on δ = 0.5Dp + 200 nm, for particles with size Dp = 0.3Dr (1.83 μm) and two channel widths (a) W = 10 μm and (b) W = 40 μm.
Mentions: The pronounced dependence of particle margination properties on channel width for the potential adhesion layer is illustrated by a comparison of Fig. 5(b) and Fig. 6. For particles with a size of Dp = 0.3Dr (1.83 μm), particle margination into the potential adhesion layer improves considerably as the channel size decreases due to the much smaller RBCFL thickness in narrow channels. Thus, particle adhesion is expected to be more efficient in small vessels (i.e., capillaries) than in large vessels (i.e., venules and arterioles). Supplementary Fig. S5 supports this observation for particles with Dp = 0.15Dr (0.91 μm). Furthermore, a reduction of margination into the potential adhesion layer with decreasing particle size is found for all channel sizes.

Bottom Line: Particle margination is studied for a wide range of hematocrit values, vessel sizes, and flow rates, using two- and three-dimensional models.The simulations show that the margination properties of particles improve with increasing carrier size.In conclusion, micron-sized ellipsoidal particles are favorable for drug delivery in comparison with sub-micron spherical particles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Theoretical Soft Matter and Biophysics, Institute of Complex Systems and Institute for Advanced Simulation, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Drug delivery by micro- and nano-carriers enables controlled transport of pharmaceuticals to targeted sites. Even though carrier fabrication has made much progress recently, the delivery including controlled particle distribution and adhesion within the body remains a great challenge. The adhesion of carriers is strongly affected by their margination properties (migration toward walls) in the microvasculature. To investigate margination characteristics of carriers of different shapes and sizes and to elucidate the relevant physical mechanisms, we employ mesoscopic hydrodynamic simulations of blood flow. Particle margination is studied for a wide range of hematocrit values, vessel sizes, and flow rates, using two- and three-dimensional models. The simulations show that the margination properties of particles improve with increasing carrier size. Spherical particles yield slightly better margination than ellipsoidal carriers; however, ellipsoidal particles exhibit a slower rotational dynamics near a wall favoring their adhesion. In conclusion, micron-sized ellipsoidal particles are favorable for drug delivery in comparison with sub-micron spherical particles.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus