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Foreign body in the kidney: an unusual case and its management.

Singh DV, Swami YK, Rana YP, Wani SM - Cent European J Urol (2014)

Bottom Line: An ingested FB reaching the kidneys is extremely rare.This article includes an interesting case of FB, which apparently reached the kidney through the gastrointestinal tract as well as a brief review of the relevant literature.The case was successfully managed laparoscopically.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Army Hospital, Research & Referral, Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Encountering a foreign body (FB) in the kidney is uncommon. Most of the time a FB is introduced externally (violence or accident) or through endourological interventions. An ingested FB reaching the kidneys is extremely rare. This article includes an interesting case of FB, which apparently reached the kidney through the gastrointestinal tract as well as a brief review of the relevant literature. The case was successfully managed laparoscopically.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CT scan showing the foreign body in relation to left upper ureter and pelvicalyceal systemand a calculus.
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Figure 0002: CT scan showing the foreign body in relation to left upper ureter and pelvicalyceal systemand a calculus.

Mentions: Subsequently, both ureteric stents were removed (October 2010) and multiple sessions of bilateral extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) was performed for clearance of residual stones. The patient was comfortable and discharged with few small residual calculi. He presented to the same medical center with colicky left flank pain and dysuria in June 2011 with no symptoms of gastrointestinal disturbance and no abnormality upon examination of the abdomen. A plain X–ray showed bilateral residual calculi with a linear radio opaque shadow in the left renal area (Figure 1). This radio opaque shadow was considered to be a foreign body (FB), supposedly a piece of guide wire or ureteric stent in the left upper ureter resulting from the previous urological interventions. A CT scan was performed to delineate the exact anatomical location of the FB and stones in relation to the left upper ureter and pelvicalyceal system (Figure 2). The patient was taken up for left URS and no foreign body was identified in the left ureter or pelvis.


Foreign body in the kidney: an unusual case and its management.

Singh DV, Swami YK, Rana YP, Wani SM - Cent European J Urol (2014)

CT scan showing the foreign body in relation to left upper ureter and pelvicalyceal systemand a calculus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3992441&req=5

Figure 0002: CT scan showing the foreign body in relation to left upper ureter and pelvicalyceal systemand a calculus.
Mentions: Subsequently, both ureteric stents were removed (October 2010) and multiple sessions of bilateral extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) was performed for clearance of residual stones. The patient was comfortable and discharged with few small residual calculi. He presented to the same medical center with colicky left flank pain and dysuria in June 2011 with no symptoms of gastrointestinal disturbance and no abnormality upon examination of the abdomen. A plain X–ray showed bilateral residual calculi with a linear radio opaque shadow in the left renal area (Figure 1). This radio opaque shadow was considered to be a foreign body (FB), supposedly a piece of guide wire or ureteric stent in the left upper ureter resulting from the previous urological interventions. A CT scan was performed to delineate the exact anatomical location of the FB and stones in relation to the left upper ureter and pelvicalyceal system (Figure 2). The patient was taken up for left URS and no foreign body was identified in the left ureter or pelvis.

Bottom Line: An ingested FB reaching the kidneys is extremely rare.This article includes an interesting case of FB, which apparently reached the kidney through the gastrointestinal tract as well as a brief review of the relevant literature.The case was successfully managed laparoscopically.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Army Hospital, Research & Referral, Delhi, India.

ABSTRACT
Encountering a foreign body (FB) in the kidney is uncommon. Most of the time a FB is introduced externally (violence or accident) or through endourological interventions. An ingested FB reaching the kidneys is extremely rare. This article includes an interesting case of FB, which apparently reached the kidney through the gastrointestinal tract as well as a brief review of the relevant literature. The case was successfully managed laparoscopically.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus