Limits...
Congenital absence of the pericardium.

Kim HJ, Cho YS, Cho GY, Choi SI - J Cardiovasc Ultrasound (2014)

Bottom Line: Congenital absence of the pericardium is a rare cardiac malformation and is most often asymptomatic.It is usually discovered as an incidental finding.Physical examination, chest radiography, and electrocardiogram are often unremarkable.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. ; Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Congenital absence of the pericardium is a rare cardiac malformation and is most often asymptomatic. It is usually discovered as an incidental finding. Physical examination, chest radiography, and electrocardiogram are often unremarkable. Echocardiography provides valuable information, and sometimes computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is needed for subsequent confirmation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A: 12-lead electrocardiogram demonstrating sinus rhythm with an incomplete right bundle branch block. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating leftward position of the heart, flattening of the left heart border, and a lucent area between the aorta and pulmonary artery (white arrow). C: Echocardiography apical four chamber view: left ventricular apex showed a swinging motion in diastole and systole. D: Chest CT revealed nonvisualization of the pericardium (yellow arrows) and left-ward displacement of the entire heart with mild right ventricular dilatation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3992347&req=5

Figure 2: A: 12-lead electrocardiogram demonstrating sinus rhythm with an incomplete right bundle branch block. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating leftward position of the heart, flattening of the left heart border, and a lucent area between the aorta and pulmonary artery (white arrow). C: Echocardiography apical four chamber view: left ventricular apex showed a swinging motion in diastole and systole. D: Chest CT revealed nonvisualization of the pericardium (yellow arrows) and left-ward displacement of the entire heart with mild right ventricular dilatation.

Mentions: A 56-year-old man was referred to our clinic for ECG abnormality. He had no chest pain, dyspnea, or other specific signs and symptoms. His past medical history and family history were unremarkable. He neither took medications nor used tobacco or alcohol. On examination, his blood pressure was 126/76 mmHg. A systolic ejection-type murmur was present with regular heart rhythm. A 12-lead ECG showed sinus rhythm with a heart rate of 59 bpm, an incomplete right bundle branch block, and a slight increase in left ventricular voltage (Fig. 2A). Chest radiography revealed flattening of the left heart border and a lucent area between the aorta and pulmonary artery due to lung interposition (Fig. 2B). The patient underwent an echocardiogram and chest CT because of the abnormal chest radiography, murmur, and ECG. The echocardiography showed a left laterally displaced left ventricle (LV) apex with a swinging motion that was highly suggestive of congenital absence of the pericardium (Fig. 2C). The RV cavity was enlarged as 38 mm and demonstrated paradoxical septal motion. LV systolic function was normal. The chest CT revealed nonvisualization of the pericardium and leftward displacement of the entire heart with mild RV dilatation (Fig. 2D). The patient was diagnosed with congenital absence of the pericardium.


Congenital absence of the pericardium.

Kim HJ, Cho YS, Cho GY, Choi SI - J Cardiovasc Ultrasound (2014)

A: 12-lead electrocardiogram demonstrating sinus rhythm with an incomplete right bundle branch block. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating leftward position of the heart, flattening of the left heart border, and a lucent area between the aorta and pulmonary artery (white arrow). C: Echocardiography apical four chamber view: left ventricular apex showed a swinging motion in diastole and systole. D: Chest CT revealed nonvisualization of the pericardium (yellow arrows) and left-ward displacement of the entire heart with mild right ventricular dilatation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3992347&req=5

Figure 2: A: 12-lead electrocardiogram demonstrating sinus rhythm with an incomplete right bundle branch block. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating leftward position of the heart, flattening of the left heart border, and a lucent area between the aorta and pulmonary artery (white arrow). C: Echocardiography apical four chamber view: left ventricular apex showed a swinging motion in diastole and systole. D: Chest CT revealed nonvisualization of the pericardium (yellow arrows) and left-ward displacement of the entire heart with mild right ventricular dilatation.
Mentions: A 56-year-old man was referred to our clinic for ECG abnormality. He had no chest pain, dyspnea, or other specific signs and symptoms. His past medical history and family history were unremarkable. He neither took medications nor used tobacco or alcohol. On examination, his blood pressure was 126/76 mmHg. A systolic ejection-type murmur was present with regular heart rhythm. A 12-lead ECG showed sinus rhythm with a heart rate of 59 bpm, an incomplete right bundle branch block, and a slight increase in left ventricular voltage (Fig. 2A). Chest radiography revealed flattening of the left heart border and a lucent area between the aorta and pulmonary artery due to lung interposition (Fig. 2B). The patient underwent an echocardiogram and chest CT because of the abnormal chest radiography, murmur, and ECG. The echocardiography showed a left laterally displaced left ventricle (LV) apex with a swinging motion that was highly suggestive of congenital absence of the pericardium (Fig. 2C). The RV cavity was enlarged as 38 mm and demonstrated paradoxical septal motion. LV systolic function was normal. The chest CT revealed nonvisualization of the pericardium and leftward displacement of the entire heart with mild RV dilatation (Fig. 2D). The patient was diagnosed with congenital absence of the pericardium.

Bottom Line: Congenital absence of the pericardium is a rare cardiac malformation and is most often asymptomatic.It is usually discovered as an incidental finding.Physical examination, chest radiography, and electrocardiogram are often unremarkable.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. ; Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Congenital absence of the pericardium is a rare cardiac malformation and is most often asymptomatic. It is usually discovered as an incidental finding. Physical examination, chest radiography, and electrocardiogram are often unremarkable. Echocardiography provides valuable information, and sometimes computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is needed for subsequent confirmation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus