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Congenital absence of the pericardium.

Kim HJ, Cho YS, Cho GY, Choi SI - J Cardiovasc Ultrasound (2014)

Bottom Line: Congenital absence of the pericardium is a rare cardiac malformation and is most often asymptomatic.It is usually discovered as an incidental finding.Physical examination, chest radiography, and electrocardiogram are often unremarkable.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. ; Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Congenital absence of the pericardium is a rare cardiac malformation and is most often asymptomatic. It is usually discovered as an incidental finding. Physical examination, chest radiography, and electrocardiogram are often unremarkable. Echocardiography provides valuable information, and sometimes computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is needed for subsequent confirmation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A: 12-lead electrocardiogram demonstrating normal sinus rhythm and right deviation of the heart axis. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating leftward position of the heart and the bulging contour of the left heart border. C: Echocardiography apical four chamber view: echocardiography showed a globe-shaped heart and bulbous ventricle. D: Chest CT revealed outpouching of the RV, which contacted the left chest wall (white arrows). E: Chest CT showed interposition of the lung between the aortic arch and pulmonary trunk (yellow arrow). LA: left atrium, LV: left ventricle, RA: right atrium, RV: right ventricle, Ao: aorta.
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Figure 1: A: 12-lead electrocardiogram demonstrating normal sinus rhythm and right deviation of the heart axis. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating leftward position of the heart and the bulging contour of the left heart border. C: Echocardiography apical four chamber view: echocardiography showed a globe-shaped heart and bulbous ventricle. D: Chest CT revealed outpouching of the RV, which contacted the left chest wall (white arrows). E: Chest CT showed interposition of the lung between the aortic arch and pulmonary trunk (yellow arrow). LA: left atrium, LV: left ventricle, RA: right atrium, RV: right ventricle, Ao: aorta.

Mentions: A 19-year-old woman was referred to our clinic for further evaluation of cardiomegaly on chest radiography. She had no chest pain, shortness of breath, or other specific signs and symptoms. Her past medical history and family history were unremarkable. She had not taken any medications and denied use of illicit drugs and tobacco or alcohol abuse. On cardiac examination, a regular heart rhythm was heard without heart murmur. A 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) showed normal sinus rhythm, with a heart rate of 62 bpm and right deviation of the heart axis (Fig. 1A). The chest radiograph revealed that the heart had bulging contour of the left superior cardiac border and leftward shift (Fig. 1B). The echocardiography showed a globe-shaped heart and bulbous ventricle due to suspension of the heart from its basal pedicle (Fig. 1C). It also revealed mitral valve prolapse. The estimated left ventricular ejection fraction was 65%. Chest computed tomography (CT) revealed outpouching of the right ventricle (RV), which contacted the left chest wall, and interposition of the lung between the aortic arch and prominent pulmonary trunk (Fig. 1D and E). The patient was diagnosed with congenital absence of the left pericardium.


Congenital absence of the pericardium.

Kim HJ, Cho YS, Cho GY, Choi SI - J Cardiovasc Ultrasound (2014)

A: 12-lead electrocardiogram demonstrating normal sinus rhythm and right deviation of the heart axis. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating leftward position of the heart and the bulging contour of the left heart border. C: Echocardiography apical four chamber view: echocardiography showed a globe-shaped heart and bulbous ventricle. D: Chest CT revealed outpouching of the RV, which contacted the left chest wall (white arrows). E: Chest CT showed interposition of the lung between the aortic arch and pulmonary trunk (yellow arrow). LA: left atrium, LV: left ventricle, RA: right atrium, RV: right ventricle, Ao: aorta.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3992347&req=5

Figure 1: A: 12-lead electrocardiogram demonstrating normal sinus rhythm and right deviation of the heart axis. B: Chest radiograph demonstrating leftward position of the heart and the bulging contour of the left heart border. C: Echocardiography apical four chamber view: echocardiography showed a globe-shaped heart and bulbous ventricle. D: Chest CT revealed outpouching of the RV, which contacted the left chest wall (white arrows). E: Chest CT showed interposition of the lung between the aortic arch and pulmonary trunk (yellow arrow). LA: left atrium, LV: left ventricle, RA: right atrium, RV: right ventricle, Ao: aorta.
Mentions: A 19-year-old woman was referred to our clinic for further evaluation of cardiomegaly on chest radiography. She had no chest pain, shortness of breath, or other specific signs and symptoms. Her past medical history and family history were unremarkable. She had not taken any medications and denied use of illicit drugs and tobacco or alcohol abuse. On cardiac examination, a regular heart rhythm was heard without heart murmur. A 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) showed normal sinus rhythm, with a heart rate of 62 bpm and right deviation of the heart axis (Fig. 1A). The chest radiograph revealed that the heart had bulging contour of the left superior cardiac border and leftward shift (Fig. 1B). The echocardiography showed a globe-shaped heart and bulbous ventricle due to suspension of the heart from its basal pedicle (Fig. 1C). It also revealed mitral valve prolapse. The estimated left ventricular ejection fraction was 65%. Chest computed tomography (CT) revealed outpouching of the right ventricle (RV), which contacted the left chest wall, and interposition of the lung between the aortic arch and prominent pulmonary trunk (Fig. 1D and E). The patient was diagnosed with congenital absence of the left pericardium.

Bottom Line: Congenital absence of the pericardium is a rare cardiac malformation and is most often asymptomatic.It is usually discovered as an incidental finding.Physical examination, chest radiography, and electrocardiogram are often unremarkable.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Korea. ; Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Congenital absence of the pericardium is a rare cardiac malformation and is most often asymptomatic. It is usually discovered as an incidental finding. Physical examination, chest radiography, and electrocardiogram are often unremarkable. Echocardiography provides valuable information, and sometimes computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging is needed for subsequent confirmation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus