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Malarial Infection among Antenatal and Maternity Clinics Attendees at the Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria.

Amuta E, Houmsou R, Wama E, Ameh M - Infect Dis Rep (2014)

Bottom Line: Pregnant women that are illiterates (χ(2) =15.44, P=0.100) and those that are farmers (χ(2) =9.20, P=0.270) had the highest infection rate with no significant difference respectively.Malarial infection was significantly higher in the multigravidae, 57.6% (34/59) (χ(2) =5.16, P=0.007) and non-significant in the pregnant women at their third trimester of pregnancy, 60.9% (53/89) (χ(2) =4.45, P=0.108).Combined method of prevention (insecticides treated nets and insecticide spray) yielded good results and its use is advocated in preventing malaria among the pregnant women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, University of Agriculture , Makurdi, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT
This study assessed the level of malarial infection in relation to some epidemiological factors, gravidity and pregnancy period of antenatal clinic attendees of the Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria. We also assessed malarial infection in placental blood in relation to gravidity of pregnant women at delivery in the maternity clinic of the same hospital. Thin and thick blood films were prepared for microscopic examination. A questionnaire was administered to each pregnant woman at the antenatal clinic to collect data on educational level, occupation, gravidity, pregnancy period, malaria preventive measures and malaria symptoms. Of the 163 pregnant women examined at the antenatal clinic, 68.3% (111/163) were infected with malaria. Pregnant women that are illiterates (χ(2) =15.44, P=0.100) and those that are farmers (χ(2) =9.20, P=0.270) had the highest infection rate with no significant difference respectively. Malarial infection was significantly higher in the multigravidae, 57.6% (34/59) (χ(2) =5.16, P=0.007) and non-significant in the pregnant women at their third trimester of pregnancy, 60.9% (53/89) (χ(2) =4.45, P=0.108). Placental malaria was significantly higher in the primigravidae among pregnant women at delivery (χ(2) =9.33, P=0.000). A significant difference (χ(2) =33.52, P=0.000) was observed between pregnant women that did not use any malaria preventive methods, 91.2% (31/34) and those that used single, 64.3% (65/101) and combined, 46.4% (13/28) methods of prevention. Malaria remains highly prevalent among antenatal clinics attendees in Makurdi, Nigeria. Combined method of prevention (insecticides treated nets and insecticide spray) yielded good results and its use is advocated in preventing malaria among the pregnant women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Knowledge of malaria symptoms among pregnant women attending antenatal services at Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria.
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fig001: Knowledge of malaria symptoms among pregnant women attending antenatal services at Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria.

Mentions: Out of the 163 pregnant women interviewed about knowledge of malaria symptoms, only 15.0% (25/163) did not know any malaria symptoms and 85.0% (138/163) knew at least two and more malaria symptoms (Figure 1).


Malarial Infection among Antenatal and Maternity Clinics Attendees at the Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria.

Amuta E, Houmsou R, Wama E, Ameh M - Infect Dis Rep (2014)

Knowledge of malaria symptoms among pregnant women attending antenatal services at Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3987244&req=5

fig001: Knowledge of malaria symptoms among pregnant women attending antenatal services at Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria.
Mentions: Out of the 163 pregnant women interviewed about knowledge of malaria symptoms, only 15.0% (25/163) did not know any malaria symptoms and 85.0% (138/163) knew at least two and more malaria symptoms (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Pregnant women that are illiterates (χ(2) =15.44, P=0.100) and those that are farmers (χ(2) =9.20, P=0.270) had the highest infection rate with no significant difference respectively.Malarial infection was significantly higher in the multigravidae, 57.6% (34/59) (χ(2) =5.16, P=0.007) and non-significant in the pregnant women at their third trimester of pregnancy, 60.9% (53/89) (χ(2) =4.45, P=0.108).Combined method of prevention (insecticides treated nets and insecticide spray) yielded good results and its use is advocated in preventing malaria among the pregnant women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, University of Agriculture , Makurdi, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT
This study assessed the level of malarial infection in relation to some epidemiological factors, gravidity and pregnancy period of antenatal clinic attendees of the Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Benue State, Nigeria. We also assessed malarial infection in placental blood in relation to gravidity of pregnant women at delivery in the maternity clinic of the same hospital. Thin and thick blood films were prepared for microscopic examination. A questionnaire was administered to each pregnant woman at the antenatal clinic to collect data on educational level, occupation, gravidity, pregnancy period, malaria preventive measures and malaria symptoms. Of the 163 pregnant women examined at the antenatal clinic, 68.3% (111/163) were infected with malaria. Pregnant women that are illiterates (χ(2) =15.44, P=0.100) and those that are farmers (χ(2) =9.20, P=0.270) had the highest infection rate with no significant difference respectively. Malarial infection was significantly higher in the multigravidae, 57.6% (34/59) (χ(2) =5.16, P=0.007) and non-significant in the pregnant women at their third trimester of pregnancy, 60.9% (53/89) (χ(2) =4.45, P=0.108). Placental malaria was significantly higher in the primigravidae among pregnant women at delivery (χ(2) =9.33, P=0.000). A significant difference (χ(2) =33.52, P=0.000) was observed between pregnant women that did not use any malaria preventive methods, 91.2% (31/34) and those that used single, 64.3% (65/101) and combined, 46.4% (13/28) methods of prevention. Malaria remains highly prevalent among antenatal clinics attendees in Makurdi, Nigeria. Combined method of prevention (insecticides treated nets and insecticide spray) yielded good results and its use is advocated in preventing malaria among the pregnant women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus