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Exposure to neighborhood green space and mental health: evidence from the survey of the health of Wisconsin.

Beyer KM, Kaltenbach A, Szabo A, Bogar S, Nieto FJ, Malecki KM - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: Multivariate survey regression analyses examine the association between green space and mental health using the unique, population-based Survey of the Health of Wisconsin database.Higher levels of neighborhood green space were associated with significantly lower levels of symptomology for depression, anxiety and stress, after controlling for a wide range of confounding factors.Results suggest that "greening" could be a potential population mental health improvement strategy in the United States.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Epidemiology, Institute for Health and Society, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Rd., Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA. kbeyer@mcw.edu.

ABSTRACT
Green space is now widely viewed as a health-promoting characteristic of residential environments, and has been linked to mental health benefits such as recovery from mental fatigue and reduced stress, particularly through experimental work in environmental psychology. Few population level studies have examined the relationships between green space and mental health. Further, few studies have considered the role of green space in non-urban settings. This study contributes a population-level perspective from the United States to examine the relationship between environmental green space and mental health outcomes in a study area that includes a spectrum of urban to rural environments. Multivariate survey regression analyses examine the association between green space and mental health using the unique, population-based Survey of the Health of Wisconsin database. Analyses were adjusted for length of residence in the neighborhood to reduce the impact of neighborhood selection bias. Higher levels of neighborhood green space were associated with significantly lower levels of symptomology for depression, anxiety and stress, after controlling for a wide range of confounding factors. Results suggest that "greening" could be a potential population mental health improvement strategy in the United States.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

2001 Proportion Tree Canopy and SHOW Block Groups.
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ijerph-11-03453-f002: 2001 Proportion Tree Canopy and SHOW Block Groups.

Mentions: Tree canopy coverage was measured using 2001 Percent Tree Canopy data from the National Land Cover Database [61]. This is the most recent data readily available on Wisconsin tree canopy and is helpful in determining the independent influence of trees and the forested environments they represent, as opposed to greenness that may originate from agriculture or other land uses. The median percent tree canopy in SHOW census block groups is 10%; Figure 2 compares census block groups with 10% or more tree canopy to block groups with less than 10% canopy.


Exposure to neighborhood green space and mental health: evidence from the survey of the health of Wisconsin.

Beyer KM, Kaltenbach A, Szabo A, Bogar S, Nieto FJ, Malecki KM - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

2001 Proportion Tree Canopy and SHOW Block Groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3987044&req=5

ijerph-11-03453-f002: 2001 Proportion Tree Canopy and SHOW Block Groups.
Mentions: Tree canopy coverage was measured using 2001 Percent Tree Canopy data from the National Land Cover Database [61]. This is the most recent data readily available on Wisconsin tree canopy and is helpful in determining the independent influence of trees and the forested environments they represent, as opposed to greenness that may originate from agriculture or other land uses. The median percent tree canopy in SHOW census block groups is 10%; Figure 2 compares census block groups with 10% or more tree canopy to block groups with less than 10% canopy.

Bottom Line: Multivariate survey regression analyses examine the association between green space and mental health using the unique, population-based Survey of the Health of Wisconsin database.Higher levels of neighborhood green space were associated with significantly lower levels of symptomology for depression, anxiety and stress, after controlling for a wide range of confounding factors.Results suggest that "greening" could be a potential population mental health improvement strategy in the United States.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Epidemiology, Institute for Health and Society, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Rd., Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA. kbeyer@mcw.edu.

ABSTRACT
Green space is now widely viewed as a health-promoting characteristic of residential environments, and has been linked to mental health benefits such as recovery from mental fatigue and reduced stress, particularly through experimental work in environmental psychology. Few population level studies have examined the relationships between green space and mental health. Further, few studies have considered the role of green space in non-urban settings. This study contributes a population-level perspective from the United States to examine the relationship between environmental green space and mental health outcomes in a study area that includes a spectrum of urban to rural environments. Multivariate survey regression analyses examine the association between green space and mental health using the unique, population-based Survey of the Health of Wisconsin database. Analyses were adjusted for length of residence in the neighborhood to reduce the impact of neighborhood selection bias. Higher levels of neighborhood green space were associated with significantly lower levels of symptomology for depression, anxiety and stress, after controlling for a wide range of confounding factors. Results suggest that "greening" could be a potential population mental health improvement strategy in the United States.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus