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National survey of oral/dental conditions related to tobacco and alcohol use in Mexican adults.

Medina-Solís CE, Pontigo-Loyola AP, Pérez-Campos E, Hernández-Cruz P, Ávila-Burgos L, Mendoza-Rodríguez M, Maupomé G - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: Questionnaires were used to collect information related to sociodemographic, socioeconomic, and other risk factors.Three models were generated for each age group (18-30, 31-45 and 46-98 years).Because tobacco and alcohol use were associated with self-reported oral/dental problems in one out of four adults, it appears advisable to ascertain how direct is such link; more direct effects would lend greater weight to adopting measures to reduce consumption of tobacco and alcohol for the specific purpose of improving oral health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Academic Area of Dentistry of Health Sciences Institute at Autonomous University of Hidalgo State, Pachuca, Hidalgo 42160, Mexico. cemedinas@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT
Oral diseases are a major burden on individuals and health systems. The aim of this study was to determine whether consumption of tobacco and alcohol were associated with the prevalence of oral/dental problems in Mexican adults. Using data from the National Performance Evaluation Survey 2003, a cross-sectional study part of the World Health Survey, dental information from a representative sample of Mexico (n = 22,229, N = 51,155,740) was used to document self-reported oral/dental problems in the 12 months prior to the survey. Questionnaires were used to collect information related to sociodemographic, socioeconomic, and other risk factors. Three models were generated for each age group (18-30, 31-45 and 46-98 years). The prevalence of oral/dental conditions was 25.7%. Adjusting for sex, schooling, socioeconomic position, diabetes, and self-reported health, those who used tobacco (sometimes or daily) (OR = 1.15, p = 0.070; OR = 1.24, p < 0.01; and OR = 1.16, p < 0.05, for each age group respectively) or alcohol (moderate or high) (OR = 1.26, p < 0.001; OR = 1.18, p < 0.01 and OR = 1.30, p < 0.001, for each age group respectively) had a higher risk of reporting oral/dental problems. Because tobacco and alcohol use were associated with self-reported oral/dental problems in one out of four adults, it appears advisable to ascertain how direct is such link; more direct effects would lend greater weight to adopting measures to reduce consumption of tobacco and alcohol for the specific purpose of improving oral health.

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Flow chart for the individuals included in the study.
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ijerph-11-03169-f001: Flow chart for the individuals included in the study.

Mentions: The present study conducted analyses of the National Performance Evaluation Survey 2003 (NPES) in Mexico. This cross-sectional study was part of the technical collaboration between the Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization (WHO), which used the survey instrument and sampling strategies developed by WHO for the World Health Survey (WHS). Further details of the survey methodology and on some oral health indicators are available elsewhere [33,34,35,36]. Information was collected from 38,746 households, with a mean of 1,250 households for each State. The sample design was probabilistic, multistage, stratified, through conglomerates, and was calculated to provide representative information at the State level, and across urban and rural areas. Data on dental conditions are available for only 20 out of the 32 States of Mexico (not every state implemented the entire set of survey modules), leading to a total of 24,159 households. Only subjects with teeth were included in the present analysis, so the final sample comprised 22,229 participants (Figure 1).


National survey of oral/dental conditions related to tobacco and alcohol use in Mexican adults.

Medina-Solís CE, Pontigo-Loyola AP, Pérez-Campos E, Hernández-Cruz P, Ávila-Burgos L, Mendoza-Rodríguez M, Maupomé G - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

Flow chart for the individuals included in the study.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3987028&req=5

ijerph-11-03169-f001: Flow chart for the individuals included in the study.
Mentions: The present study conducted analyses of the National Performance Evaluation Survey 2003 (NPES) in Mexico. This cross-sectional study was part of the technical collaboration between the Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization (WHO), which used the survey instrument and sampling strategies developed by WHO for the World Health Survey (WHS). Further details of the survey methodology and on some oral health indicators are available elsewhere [33,34,35,36]. Information was collected from 38,746 households, with a mean of 1,250 households for each State. The sample design was probabilistic, multistage, stratified, through conglomerates, and was calculated to provide representative information at the State level, and across urban and rural areas. Data on dental conditions are available for only 20 out of the 32 States of Mexico (not every state implemented the entire set of survey modules), leading to a total of 24,159 households. Only subjects with teeth were included in the present analysis, so the final sample comprised 22,229 participants (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Questionnaires were used to collect information related to sociodemographic, socioeconomic, and other risk factors.Three models were generated for each age group (18-30, 31-45 and 46-98 years).Because tobacco and alcohol use were associated with self-reported oral/dental problems in one out of four adults, it appears advisable to ascertain how direct is such link; more direct effects would lend greater weight to adopting measures to reduce consumption of tobacco and alcohol for the specific purpose of improving oral health.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Academic Area of Dentistry of Health Sciences Institute at Autonomous University of Hidalgo State, Pachuca, Hidalgo 42160, Mexico. cemedinas@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT
Oral diseases are a major burden on individuals and health systems. The aim of this study was to determine whether consumption of tobacco and alcohol were associated with the prevalence of oral/dental problems in Mexican adults. Using data from the National Performance Evaluation Survey 2003, a cross-sectional study part of the World Health Survey, dental information from a representative sample of Mexico (n = 22,229, N = 51,155,740) was used to document self-reported oral/dental problems in the 12 months prior to the survey. Questionnaires were used to collect information related to sociodemographic, socioeconomic, and other risk factors. Three models were generated for each age group (18-30, 31-45 and 46-98 years). The prevalence of oral/dental conditions was 25.7%. Adjusting for sex, schooling, socioeconomic position, diabetes, and self-reported health, those who used tobacco (sometimes or daily) (OR = 1.15, p = 0.070; OR = 1.24, p < 0.01; and OR = 1.16, p < 0.05, for each age group respectively) or alcohol (moderate or high) (OR = 1.26, p < 0.001; OR = 1.18, p < 0.01 and OR = 1.30, p < 0.001, for each age group respectively) had a higher risk of reporting oral/dental problems. Because tobacco and alcohol use were associated with self-reported oral/dental problems in one out of four adults, it appears advisable to ascertain how direct is such link; more direct effects would lend greater weight to adopting measures to reduce consumption of tobacco and alcohol for the specific purpose of improving oral health.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus