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Spatial analysis of the home addresses of hospital patients with hepatitis B infection or hepatoma in Shenzhen, China from 2010 to 2012.

Hu T, Du Q, Ren F, Liang S, Lin D, Li J, Chen Y - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

Bottom Line: The methodology and the results of this study may be useful in developing a system to monitor, prevent and control these diseases.Only one-third of the patients were female, and 70.7% of all cases were 20-50 years of age.Based on incidence density and rate maps, we can conclude that the Shenzhen special zone had a higher incidence density and rate of hepatitis B infections and hepatomas compared with the area outside of the Shenzhen special zone during 2010-2012.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079, China. hutao.cumt@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hepatoma associated with hepatitis B infection is a major public health problem in Shenzhen (China) and worldwide. China has the largest number of people infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV), and many studies have demonstrated that HBV infection is associated with hepatoma development. Shenzhen officials have been attempting to monitor and control these diseases for many years. The methodology and the results of this study may be useful in developing a system to monitor, prevent and control these diseases.

Methods: The aim of the study was to analyze HBV infection and hepatoma distribution characteristics and patterns in Shenzhen by combining geographic information system (GIS) technology and spatial analysis. The study used data from patients at the district level from the 2010-2012 population censuses.

Results: Only one-third of the patients were female, and 70.7% of all cases were 20-50 years of age. There was no global spatial correlation of the distribution of hepatitis B infections and hepatomas; however, there was a local spatial correlation, and certain sub-districts of the Nanshan district had significant agglomeration effects. Based on incidence density and rate maps, we can conclude that the Shenzhen special zone had a higher incidence density and rate of hepatitis B infections and hepatomas compared with the area outside of the Shenzhen special zone during 2010-2012.

Conclusions: This study demonstrated substantial geographic variation in the incidence of hepatitis B infection and hepatoma in Shenzhen. The prediction and control of hepatitis B infections and hepatoma development and interventions for these diseases should focus on disadvantaged areas to reduce disparities. GIS and spatial analysis play an important role in public health risk-reduction programs and may become integral components in the epidemiologic description, analysis and risk assessment of hepatitis B and hepatoma.

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The location of Shenzhen City in China; the names of districts in Shenzhen City.
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ijerph-11-03143-f001: The location of Shenzhen City in China; the names of districts in Shenzhen City.

Mentions: Shenzhen is located south of the Tropic of Cancer, from 113°46' to 114°37' east longitude and between 22°27′ and 22°52′ northern latitude, in the southeast coastal areas of Guangdong and northeast of the Pearl River Estuary (Figure 1). Shenzhen is 81.4 km from east to west and 10.8 km from north to south, covering a total area of 1,952 km2, and has a population of more than ten million individuals. Shenzhen is connected with Hong Kong’s New Territories south of the Shenzhen River and Shenzhen Bay, with Dongguan to the north and with Huizhou to the east. One of the earliest special economic zones in China was in Shenzhen (including the four districts of Luohu, Futian, Nanshan and Yantian). At present, there are a total of 10 districts (Luohu, Futian, Nanshan, Yantian, Baoan, Longgang, Guangming, Pingshan, Longhua and Dapeng) in Shenzhen. Figure 1 shows the location of Shenzhen City in China and the names of the districts in Shenzhen City not shown.


Spatial analysis of the home addresses of hospital patients with hepatitis B infection or hepatoma in Shenzhen, China from 2010 to 2012.

Hu T, Du Q, Ren F, Liang S, Lin D, Li J, Chen Y - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2014)

The location of Shenzhen City in China; the names of districts in Shenzhen City.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3987026&req=5

ijerph-11-03143-f001: The location of Shenzhen City in China; the names of districts in Shenzhen City.
Mentions: Shenzhen is located south of the Tropic of Cancer, from 113°46' to 114°37' east longitude and between 22°27′ and 22°52′ northern latitude, in the southeast coastal areas of Guangdong and northeast of the Pearl River Estuary (Figure 1). Shenzhen is 81.4 km from east to west and 10.8 km from north to south, covering a total area of 1,952 km2, and has a population of more than ten million individuals. Shenzhen is connected with Hong Kong’s New Territories south of the Shenzhen River and Shenzhen Bay, with Dongguan to the north and with Huizhou to the east. One of the earliest special economic zones in China was in Shenzhen (including the four districts of Luohu, Futian, Nanshan and Yantian). At present, there are a total of 10 districts (Luohu, Futian, Nanshan, Yantian, Baoan, Longgang, Guangming, Pingshan, Longhua and Dapeng) in Shenzhen. Figure 1 shows the location of Shenzhen City in China and the names of the districts in Shenzhen City not shown.

Bottom Line: The methodology and the results of this study may be useful in developing a system to monitor, prevent and control these diseases.Only one-third of the patients were female, and 70.7% of all cases were 20-50 years of age.Based on incidence density and rate maps, we can conclude that the Shenzhen special zone had a higher incidence density and rate of hepatitis B infections and hepatomas compared with the area outside of the Shenzhen special zone during 2010-2012.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079, China. hutao.cumt@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hepatoma associated with hepatitis B infection is a major public health problem in Shenzhen (China) and worldwide. China has the largest number of people infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV), and many studies have demonstrated that HBV infection is associated with hepatoma development. Shenzhen officials have been attempting to monitor and control these diseases for many years. The methodology and the results of this study may be useful in developing a system to monitor, prevent and control these diseases.

Methods: The aim of the study was to analyze HBV infection and hepatoma distribution characteristics and patterns in Shenzhen by combining geographic information system (GIS) technology and spatial analysis. The study used data from patients at the district level from the 2010-2012 population censuses.

Results: Only one-third of the patients were female, and 70.7% of all cases were 20-50 years of age. There was no global spatial correlation of the distribution of hepatitis B infections and hepatomas; however, there was a local spatial correlation, and certain sub-districts of the Nanshan district had significant agglomeration effects. Based on incidence density and rate maps, we can conclude that the Shenzhen special zone had a higher incidence density and rate of hepatitis B infections and hepatomas compared with the area outside of the Shenzhen special zone during 2010-2012.

Conclusions: This study demonstrated substantial geographic variation in the incidence of hepatitis B infection and hepatoma in Shenzhen. The prediction and control of hepatitis B infections and hepatoma development and interventions for these diseases should focus on disadvantaged areas to reduce disparities. GIS and spatial analysis play an important role in public health risk-reduction programs and may become integral components in the epidemiologic description, analysis and risk assessment of hepatitis B and hepatoma.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus