Limits...
An extremely rare cause of bruising in children: autoerythrocyte sensitization syndrome.

Okur M, Turan H, Ozkan A, Güneş C, Kocabay K - Turk J Haematol (2012)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Düzce University, School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Düzce, Turkey.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Autoerythrocyte sensitization syndrome (ASS)—also known as Gardner-Diamond syndrome—is an autoimmune vasculopathy associated with sensitization to phosphatidylserine, a phosphoglyceride of red blood cell membranes... ASS is typically seen in adult females; however, pediatric and male patients have also been described... ASS is characterized by painful ecchymotic lesions and is most commonly observed in women experiencing emotional stress or psychiatric disorders... Although ASS is seen usually in adult women, pediatric cases have been reported [3,6]... This disorder was named as psychogenic purpura based on its association with psychiatric disturbance in the majority of patients... It should be noted, though, that some patients do not have any specific psychopathological syndrome... However, remissions even may be stable for many years... In fact, in the presence of specific histological changes, positive intracutaneous test results, psychic disorder, onset of lesions associated with stress, and the absence of hematological disorders or systemic diseases, it is not difficult to diagnose ASS... In conclusion, ASS is a rare syndrome most typically observed in adult females with psychological disturbances, but it is important to be aware that ASS can also occur in children... ASS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of purpura and ecchymosis in children... The authors of this paper have no conflicts of interest, including specific financial interests, relationships, and/or affiliations relevant to the subject matter or materials included.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Normal epidermis and mild edema, extravascular erythrocytes, and nonspesific inflammatory cell infiltration in dermis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3986967&req=5

f1: Normal epidermis and mild edema, extravascular erythrocytes, and nonspesific inflammatory cell infiltration in dermis.

Mentions: Red and purple, slightly firm, irregularly shaped ecchymotic patches varying in size were observed below the knees of both legs (Figure 1). Other systemic examinations were normal. The complete blood count and differential were normal. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 8 mm h–1 and C-reactive protein was negative. Coagulation studies showed that the prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, bleeding time, factor VIII, fibrinogen, D-dimer, anti-thrombin III, protein C, and S levels were normal. Antinuclear antibodies, anti-double-stranded DNA, anticardiolipin antibodies, lupus anti-coagulant, and Coombs’ tests were negative. Hepatitis A, B, and C, toxoplasma, rubella, and cytomegalovirus serology findings were negative. Histopathological examination showed normal epidermis and mild edema, extravascular erythrocytes, and non-specific inflammatory cell infiltration in the dermis. There was no evidence of vasculitis (Figure 2). Written informed consent was obtained from the patients’ parents.


An extremely rare cause of bruising in children: autoerythrocyte sensitization syndrome.

Okur M, Turan H, Ozkan A, Güneş C, Kocabay K - Turk J Haematol (2012)

Normal epidermis and mild edema, extravascular erythrocytes, and nonspesific inflammatory cell infiltration in dermis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3986967&req=5

f1: Normal epidermis and mild edema, extravascular erythrocytes, and nonspesific inflammatory cell infiltration in dermis.
Mentions: Red and purple, slightly firm, irregularly shaped ecchymotic patches varying in size were observed below the knees of both legs (Figure 1). Other systemic examinations were normal. The complete blood count and differential were normal. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was 8 mm h–1 and C-reactive protein was negative. Coagulation studies showed that the prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, bleeding time, factor VIII, fibrinogen, D-dimer, anti-thrombin III, protein C, and S levels were normal. Antinuclear antibodies, anti-double-stranded DNA, anticardiolipin antibodies, lupus anti-coagulant, and Coombs’ tests were negative. Hepatitis A, B, and C, toxoplasma, rubella, and cytomegalovirus serology findings were negative. Histopathological examination showed normal epidermis and mild edema, extravascular erythrocytes, and non-specific inflammatory cell infiltration in the dermis. There was no evidence of vasculitis (Figure 2). Written informed consent was obtained from the patients’ parents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Düzce University, School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Düzce, Turkey.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Autoerythrocyte sensitization syndrome (ASS)—also known as Gardner-Diamond syndrome—is an autoimmune vasculopathy associated with sensitization to phosphatidylserine, a phosphoglyceride of red blood cell membranes... ASS is typically seen in adult females; however, pediatric and male patients have also been described... ASS is characterized by painful ecchymotic lesions and is most commonly observed in women experiencing emotional stress or psychiatric disorders... Although ASS is seen usually in adult women, pediatric cases have been reported [3,6]... This disorder was named as psychogenic purpura based on its association with psychiatric disturbance in the majority of patients... It should be noted, though, that some patients do not have any specific psychopathological syndrome... However, remissions even may be stable for many years... In fact, in the presence of specific histological changes, positive intracutaneous test results, psychic disorder, onset of lesions associated with stress, and the absence of hematological disorders or systemic diseases, it is not difficult to diagnose ASS... In conclusion, ASS is a rare syndrome most typically observed in adult females with psychological disturbances, but it is important to be aware that ASS can also occur in children... ASS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of purpura and ecchymosis in children... The authors of this paper have no conflicts of interest, including specific financial interests, relationships, and/or affiliations relevant to the subject matter or materials included.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus