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Successful treatment with propranolol in a patient with a segmental hemangioma: a case report.

Küpeli S, Cimen D, Küpeli BY - Turk J Haematol (2012)

Bottom Line: Propranolol was tolerated well and no side effects were observed during the treatment.The only problem to occur was disease recurrence following the withdrawal of propranolol at age 13 months, which was not within the age of spontaneous regression (generally considered as >18 months).Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Diyarbakır Children's Diseases Hospital, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Diyarbakır, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
The treatment of hemangiomas in infancy may be associated with significant morbidity. In addition to morbidity, an objective response cannot be obtained because of the absence of targeted therapeutic options. Herein, we present an infant with a segmental hemangioma and marked glucocorticoid toxicity due to prior steroid therapy that was successfully treated with propranolol. Propranolol was tolerated well and no side effects were observed during the treatment. The only problem to occur was disease recurrence following the withdrawal of propranolol at age 13 months, which was not within the age of spontaneous regression (generally considered as >18 months).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Hemangiomas on the face following propranolol treatment.
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f2: Hemangiomas on the face following propranolol treatment.

Mentions: Fifteen days after the initiation of oral propranolol treatment the family reported that the infant had no difficulty breathing and on examination we determined no purulent discharge and partial regression in hemangiomas (Figure 2). MPZ was further reduced to 3 mg·kg[u]–1[/u]·d[u]–1[/u], and then tapered to half of the previous dose 1 week apart and stopped over 1 month. The propranolol dose was adjusted monthly according to the patient’s body weight. Propranolol was withdrawn at age 13 months, as the hemangiomas on the patient’s face, neck, and tongue completely regressed, and there was no evidence of respiratory distress. The patient was brought again to hospital 15 d after the withdrawal of propranolol with dyspnea and stridor and hyperemia on previous lesions. Propranolol was started at the dose of 2 mg·kg[u]–1[/u]·d[u]–1[/u] and given until age 20 months. At the time this report was written the patient was aged 22 months and symptom-free.


Successful treatment with propranolol in a patient with a segmental hemangioma: a case report.

Küpeli S, Cimen D, Küpeli BY - Turk J Haematol (2012)

Hemangiomas on the face following propranolol treatment.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3986956&req=5

f2: Hemangiomas on the face following propranolol treatment.
Mentions: Fifteen days after the initiation of oral propranolol treatment the family reported that the infant had no difficulty breathing and on examination we determined no purulent discharge and partial regression in hemangiomas (Figure 2). MPZ was further reduced to 3 mg·kg[u]–1[/u]·d[u]–1[/u], and then tapered to half of the previous dose 1 week apart and stopped over 1 month. The propranolol dose was adjusted monthly according to the patient’s body weight. Propranolol was withdrawn at age 13 months, as the hemangiomas on the patient’s face, neck, and tongue completely regressed, and there was no evidence of respiratory distress. The patient was brought again to hospital 15 d after the withdrawal of propranolol with dyspnea and stridor and hyperemia on previous lesions. Propranolol was started at the dose of 2 mg·kg[u]–1[/u]·d[u]–1[/u] and given until age 20 months. At the time this report was written the patient was aged 22 months and symptom-free.

Bottom Line: Propranolol was tolerated well and no side effects were observed during the treatment.The only problem to occur was disease recurrence following the withdrawal of propranolol at age 13 months, which was not within the age of spontaneous regression (generally considered as >18 months).Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Diyarbakır Children's Diseases Hospital, Department of Pediatric Oncology, Diyarbakır, Turkey.

ABSTRACT
The treatment of hemangiomas in infancy may be associated with significant morbidity. In addition to morbidity, an objective response cannot be obtained because of the absence of targeted therapeutic options. Herein, we present an infant with a segmental hemangioma and marked glucocorticoid toxicity due to prior steroid therapy that was successfully treated with propranolol. Propranolol was tolerated well and no side effects were observed during the treatment. The only problem to occur was disease recurrence following the withdrawal of propranolol at age 13 months, which was not within the age of spontaneous regression (generally considered as >18 months).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus