Limits...
A bird's eye view of the air pollution-cancer link in China.

Huang YB, Song FJ, Liu Q, Li WQ, Zhang W, Chen KX - Chin J Cancer (2014)

Bottom Line: The rapidly increasing number of civilian vehicles is expected to bring NOx emission to a very high level.Archived data from China does not fully support that the concentrations of pollutants directly depend on local emissions, but this is likely due to inaccurate measurement of pollutants.The air pollution-cancer link is a serious public health issue that needs urgent investigation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin 300060, P. R. China. chenkexin1963@yahoo.com, wzhang@mdanderson.org.

ABSTRACT
Air pollution in China comes from multiple sources, including coal consumption, construction and industrial dust, and vehicle exhaust. Coal consumption in particular directly determines the emissions of three major air pollutants: dust, sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), and nitrogen oxide (NOx). The rapidly increasing number of civilian vehicles is expected to bring NOx emission to a very high level. Contrary to expectations, however, existing data show that the concentrations of major pollutants [particulate matter-10 (PM10), SO(2), and nitrogen dioxide (NO(2))] in several large Chinese cities have declined during the past decades, though they still exceed the national standards of ambient air quality. Archived data from China does not fully support that the concentrations of pollutants directly depend on local emissions, but this is likely due to inaccurate measurement of pollutants. Analyses on the cancer registry data show that cancer burden related to air pollution is on the rise in China and will likely increase further, but there is a lack of data to accurately predict the cancer burden. Past experience from other countries has sounded alarm of the link between air pollution and cancer. The quantitative association requires dedicated research as well as establishment of needed monitoring infrastructures and cancer registries. The air pollution-cancer link is a serious public health issue that needs urgent investigation.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Trends of annual emission of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxide (NOX), and dust in China from 1989 to 2012.Dust emission included both the industrial dust and dust from the living environments, but only the industrial dust was reported in 1995 and 1996. NOx emission was just monitoring since 2006. Sources of data: Chinese Environment Statistical Yearbook 1998-2012[53], [54] and Chinese National Environment Statistical Report 1995-2012[55],[56].
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cjc-33-04-176-g002: Trends of annual emission of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxide (NOX), and dust in China from 1989 to 2012.Dust emission included both the industrial dust and dust from the living environments, but only the industrial dust was reported in 1995 and 1996. NOx emission was just monitoring since 2006. Sources of data: Chinese Environment Statistical Yearbook 1998-2012[53], [54] and Chinese National Environment Statistical Report 1995-2012[55],[56].

Mentions: Unprecedented industrial development, overly coal-dependent energy consumption, and rapidly increasing number of vehicles have inevitably caused air pollutant emission to rise in China. Dust emission has decreased since 1997, the year in which the first emission standard of air pollutants in China was released[29], and sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission has decreased since 2006, the year in which national management of industrial desulfurization was piloted[30]. Nevertheless, dust and SO2 emission is still high, with level of 12.34 million tons and 21.18 million tons in 2012, respectively (Figure 2). Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission has steadily increased since monitoring was initiated in 2006, reaching a level of 23.38 million tons in 2012 (Figure 2).


A bird's eye view of the air pollution-cancer link in China.

Huang YB, Song FJ, Liu Q, Li WQ, Zhang W, Chen KX - Chin J Cancer (2014)

Trends of annual emission of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxide (NOX), and dust in China from 1989 to 2012.Dust emission included both the industrial dust and dust from the living environments, but only the industrial dust was reported in 1995 and 1996. NOx emission was just monitoring since 2006. Sources of data: Chinese Environment Statistical Yearbook 1998-2012[53], [54] and Chinese National Environment Statistical Report 1995-2012[55],[56].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3975183&req=5

cjc-33-04-176-g002: Trends of annual emission of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxide (NOX), and dust in China from 1989 to 2012.Dust emission included both the industrial dust and dust from the living environments, but only the industrial dust was reported in 1995 and 1996. NOx emission was just monitoring since 2006. Sources of data: Chinese Environment Statistical Yearbook 1998-2012[53], [54] and Chinese National Environment Statistical Report 1995-2012[55],[56].
Mentions: Unprecedented industrial development, overly coal-dependent energy consumption, and rapidly increasing number of vehicles have inevitably caused air pollutant emission to rise in China. Dust emission has decreased since 1997, the year in which the first emission standard of air pollutants in China was released[29], and sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission has decreased since 2006, the year in which national management of industrial desulfurization was piloted[30]. Nevertheless, dust and SO2 emission is still high, with level of 12.34 million tons and 21.18 million tons in 2012, respectively (Figure 2). Nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission has steadily increased since monitoring was initiated in 2006, reaching a level of 23.38 million tons in 2012 (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The rapidly increasing number of civilian vehicles is expected to bring NOx emission to a very high level.Archived data from China does not fully support that the concentrations of pollutants directly depend on local emissions, but this is likely due to inaccurate measurement of pollutants.The air pollution-cancer link is a serious public health issue that needs urgent investigation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin 300060, P. R. China. chenkexin1963@yahoo.com, wzhang@mdanderson.org.

ABSTRACT
Air pollution in China comes from multiple sources, including coal consumption, construction and industrial dust, and vehicle exhaust. Coal consumption in particular directly determines the emissions of three major air pollutants: dust, sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), and nitrogen oxide (NOx). The rapidly increasing number of civilian vehicles is expected to bring NOx emission to a very high level. Contrary to expectations, however, existing data show that the concentrations of major pollutants [particulate matter-10 (PM10), SO(2), and nitrogen dioxide (NO(2))] in several large Chinese cities have declined during the past decades, though they still exceed the national standards of ambient air quality. Archived data from China does not fully support that the concentrations of pollutants directly depend on local emissions, but this is likely due to inaccurate measurement of pollutants. Analyses on the cancer registry data show that cancer burden related to air pollution is on the rise in China and will likely increase further, but there is a lack of data to accurately predict the cancer burden. Past experience from other countries has sounded alarm of the link between air pollution and cancer. The quantitative association requires dedicated research as well as establishment of needed monitoring infrastructures and cancer registries. The air pollution-cancer link is a serious public health issue that needs urgent investigation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus