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Interferon-based anti-viral therapy for hepatitis C virus infection after renal transplantation: an updated meta-analysis.

Wei F, Liu J, Liu F, Hu H, Ren H, Hu P - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: The most frequent side-effect requiring discontinuation of treatment was graft dysfunction (14 cases, 45.1%).The sensitivity analyses by the random model yielded very similar results to the fixed-effects model.Future research is required to develop novel strategies to improve therapeutic efficacy and tolerability, and reduce the liver-related morbidity and mortality in this important patient population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of infectious Disease, Institute for Viral hepatitis, Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology for infectious disease, The second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, PR China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is highly prevalent in renal transplant (RT) recipients. Currently, interferon-based (IFN-based) antiviral therapies are the standard approach to control HCV infection. In a post-transplantation setting, however, IFN-based therapies appear to have limited efficacy and their use remains controversial. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of IFN-based therapies for HCV infection post RT.

Methods: We searched Pubmed, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and The Cochrane Library (1997-2013) for clinical trials in which transplant patients were given Interferon (IFN), pegylated interferon (PEG), interferon plus ribavirin (IFN-RIB), or pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (PEG-RIB). The Sustained Virological Response (SVR) and/or drop-out rates were the primary outcomes. Summary estimates were calculated using the random-effects model of DerSimonian and Laird, with heterogeneity and sensitivity analysis.

Results: We identified 12 clinical trials (140 patients in total). The summary estimate for SVR rate, drop-out rate and graft rejection rate was 26.6% (95%CI, 15.0-38.1%), 21.1% (95% CI, 10.9-31.2%) and 4% (95%CI: 0.8%-7.1%), respectively. The overall SVR rate in PEG-based and standard IFN-based therapy was 40.6% (24/59) and 20.9% (17/81), respectively. The most frequent side-effect requiring discontinuation of treatment was graft dysfunction (14 cases, 45.1%). Meta-regression analysis showed the covariates included contribute to the heterogeneity in the SVR logit rate, but not in the drop-out logit rate. The sensitivity analyses by the random model yielded very similar results to the fixed-effects model.

Conclusions: IFN-based therapy for HCV infection post RT has poor efficacy and limited safety. PEG-based therapy is a more effective approach for treating HCV infection post-RT than standard IFN-based therapy. Future research is required to develop novel strategies to improve therapeutic efficacy and tolerability, and reduce the liver-related morbidity and mortality in this important patient population.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Funnel plot of precision by Drop-out logit rate.
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pone-0090611-g005: Funnel plot of precision by Drop-out logit rate.

Mentions: The Egger and Begg tests for publication bias showed that the risk for missing trials was acceptably low. The funnel plots analyzing publication bias for SVR logit rate and Drop-out logit rate are shown in Figure 4 and Figure 5, respectively. The primary publication bias in our study is a preference for small cohort studies, with few large clinical trials.


Interferon-based anti-viral therapy for hepatitis C virus infection after renal transplantation: an updated meta-analysis.

Wei F, Liu J, Liu F, Hu H, Ren H, Hu P - PLoS ONE (2014)

Funnel plot of precision by Drop-out logit rate.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3974660&req=5

pone-0090611-g005: Funnel plot of precision by Drop-out logit rate.
Mentions: The Egger and Begg tests for publication bias showed that the risk for missing trials was acceptably low. The funnel plots analyzing publication bias for SVR logit rate and Drop-out logit rate are shown in Figure 4 and Figure 5, respectively. The primary publication bias in our study is a preference for small cohort studies, with few large clinical trials.

Bottom Line: The most frequent side-effect requiring discontinuation of treatment was graft dysfunction (14 cases, 45.1%).The sensitivity analyses by the random model yielded very similar results to the fixed-effects model.Future research is required to develop novel strategies to improve therapeutic efficacy and tolerability, and reduce the liver-related morbidity and mortality in this important patient population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of infectious Disease, Institute for Viral hepatitis, Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology for infectious disease, The second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, PR China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is highly prevalent in renal transplant (RT) recipients. Currently, interferon-based (IFN-based) antiviral therapies are the standard approach to control HCV infection. In a post-transplantation setting, however, IFN-based therapies appear to have limited efficacy and their use remains controversial. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of IFN-based therapies for HCV infection post RT.

Methods: We searched Pubmed, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and The Cochrane Library (1997-2013) for clinical trials in which transplant patients were given Interferon (IFN), pegylated interferon (PEG), interferon plus ribavirin (IFN-RIB), or pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (PEG-RIB). The Sustained Virological Response (SVR) and/or drop-out rates were the primary outcomes. Summary estimates were calculated using the random-effects model of DerSimonian and Laird, with heterogeneity and sensitivity analysis.

Results: We identified 12 clinical trials (140 patients in total). The summary estimate for SVR rate, drop-out rate and graft rejection rate was 26.6% (95%CI, 15.0-38.1%), 21.1% (95% CI, 10.9-31.2%) and 4% (95%CI: 0.8%-7.1%), respectively. The overall SVR rate in PEG-based and standard IFN-based therapy was 40.6% (24/59) and 20.9% (17/81), respectively. The most frequent side-effect requiring discontinuation of treatment was graft dysfunction (14 cases, 45.1%). Meta-regression analysis showed the covariates included contribute to the heterogeneity in the SVR logit rate, but not in the drop-out logit rate. The sensitivity analyses by the random model yielded very similar results to the fixed-effects model.

Conclusions: IFN-based therapy for HCV infection post RT has poor efficacy and limited safety. PEG-based therapy is a more effective approach for treating HCV infection post-RT than standard IFN-based therapy. Future research is required to develop novel strategies to improve therapeutic efficacy and tolerability, and reduce the liver-related morbidity and mortality in this important patient population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus