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Prevention and control of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease: the Cuban experience (1986-1996-2002).

Nordet P, Lopez R, Dueñas A, Sarmiento L - Cardiovasc J Afr (2008 May-Jun)

Bottom Line: There was an even more marked reduction in recurrent attacks of RF from 6.4 to 0.4 patients per 100,000, as well as in the number and severity of patients requiring hospitalisation and surgical care.Regular compliance with secondary prophylaxis increased progressively and the direct costs related to treatment of RF/RHD decreased with time.The implementation of the programme did not incur much additional cost for healthcare.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: World Health Organisation, Geneva, Switzerland. pnordet@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are still major medical and public health problems mainly in developing countries. Pilot studies conducted during the last five decades in developed and developing countries indicated that the prevention and control of RF/RHD is possible. During the 1970s and 1980s, epidemiological studies were carried out in selected areas of Cuba in order to determine the prevalence and characteristics of RF/RHD, and to test several long-term strategies for prevention of the diseases.

Methods: Between 1986 and 1996 we carried out a comprehensive 10-year prevention programme in the Cuban province of Pinar del Rio and evaluated its efficacy five years later. The project included primary and secondary prevention of RF/RHD, training of personnel, health education, dissemination of information, community involvement and epidemiological surveillance. Permanent local and provincial RF/RHD registers were established at all hospitals, policlinics and family physicians in the province. Educational activities and training workshops were organised at provincial, local and health facility level. Thousands of pamphlets and hundreds of posters were distributed, and special programmes were broadcast on the public media to advertise the project.

Results: There was a progressive decline in the occurrence and severity of acute RF and RHD, with a marked decrease in the prevalence of RHD in school children from 2.27 patients per 1,000 children in 1986 to 0.24 per 1,000 in 1996. A marked and progressive decline was also seen in the incidence and severity of acute RF in five- to 25-year-olds, from 18.6 patients per 100,000 in 1986 to 2.5 per 100,000 in 1996. There was an even more marked reduction in recurrent attacks of RF from 6.4 to 0.4 patients per 100,000, as well as in the number and severity of patients requiring hospitalisation and surgical care. Regular compliance with secondary prophylaxis increased progressively and the direct costs related to treatment of RF/RHD decreased with time. The implementation of the programme did not incur much additional cost for healthcare. Five years after the project ended, most of the measures initiated at the start of the programme were still in place and occurrence of RF/RHD was low.

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Incidence of acute rheumatic fever per 100 000 people: both first and recurrent attacks in five- to 25-year-olds.
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Figure 2: Incidence of acute rheumatic fever per 100 000 people: both first and recurrent attacks in five- to 25-year-olds.

Mentions: The incidence per 100 000 children of school-going age of both first and recurrent acute attacks of RF also had a marked decrease from 28.4 per 100 000 in 1986 to 2.7 in 1996, most markedly in the incidence of a first attack. This was also observed when we included the age group five to 25 years old (Table 2, Fig. 2).


Prevention and control of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease: the Cuban experience (1986-1996-2002).

Nordet P, Lopez R, Dueñas A, Sarmiento L - Cardiovasc J Afr (2008 May-Jun)

Incidence of acute rheumatic fever per 100 000 people: both first and recurrent attacks in five- to 25-year-olds.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3974561&req=5

Figure 2: Incidence of acute rheumatic fever per 100 000 people: both first and recurrent attacks in five- to 25-year-olds.
Mentions: The incidence per 100 000 children of school-going age of both first and recurrent acute attacks of RF also had a marked decrease from 28.4 per 100 000 in 1986 to 2.7 in 1996, most markedly in the incidence of a first attack. This was also observed when we included the age group five to 25 years old (Table 2, Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: There was an even more marked reduction in recurrent attacks of RF from 6.4 to 0.4 patients per 100,000, as well as in the number and severity of patients requiring hospitalisation and surgical care.Regular compliance with secondary prophylaxis increased progressively and the direct costs related to treatment of RF/RHD decreased with time.The implementation of the programme did not incur much additional cost for healthcare.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: World Health Organisation, Geneva, Switzerland. pnordet@hotmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are still major medical and public health problems mainly in developing countries. Pilot studies conducted during the last five decades in developed and developing countries indicated that the prevention and control of RF/RHD is possible. During the 1970s and 1980s, epidemiological studies were carried out in selected areas of Cuba in order to determine the prevalence and characteristics of RF/RHD, and to test several long-term strategies for prevention of the diseases.

Methods: Between 1986 and 1996 we carried out a comprehensive 10-year prevention programme in the Cuban province of Pinar del Rio and evaluated its efficacy five years later. The project included primary and secondary prevention of RF/RHD, training of personnel, health education, dissemination of information, community involvement and epidemiological surveillance. Permanent local and provincial RF/RHD registers were established at all hospitals, policlinics and family physicians in the province. Educational activities and training workshops were organised at provincial, local and health facility level. Thousands of pamphlets and hundreds of posters were distributed, and special programmes were broadcast on the public media to advertise the project.

Results: There was a progressive decline in the occurrence and severity of acute RF and RHD, with a marked decrease in the prevalence of RHD in school children from 2.27 patients per 1,000 children in 1986 to 0.24 per 1,000 in 1996. A marked and progressive decline was also seen in the incidence and severity of acute RF in five- to 25-year-olds, from 18.6 patients per 100,000 in 1986 to 2.5 per 100,000 in 1996. There was an even more marked reduction in recurrent attacks of RF from 6.4 to 0.4 patients per 100,000, as well as in the number and severity of patients requiring hospitalisation and surgical care. Regular compliance with secondary prophylaxis increased progressively and the direct costs related to treatment of RF/RHD decreased with time. The implementation of the programme did not incur much additional cost for healthcare. Five years after the project ended, most of the measures initiated at the start of the programme were still in place and occurrence of RF/RHD was low.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus