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Traditional Tar Production from the Anatolian Black Pine [Pinus nigra Arn. subsp. pallasiana (Lamb.) Holmboe var. pallasiana] and its usages in Afyonkarahisar, Central Western Turkey.

Arı S, Kargıoğlu M, Temel M, Konuk M - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2014)

Bottom Line: The traditional method for obtaining tar from Pinus nigra subsp. pallasiana by local people was recorded and the local usages (curing ear pain in children, osteomyelitis, wounds, ulcers, eczema, acne, alopecia, fungus, foot-and-mouth disease in animals, mouth sores in sheep and goats, protection against endo- and ectoparasites, repellent for snakes, mice, flies (Tabanus bovinus) and ticks, and the prevention of water leakage from roofs) of tar are described.In this study, the traditional method for obtaining tar and the traditional usages of tar are explained.Documentation of the method of obtaining tar and its traditional usages may contribute to scientific research on the benefits and usages of tar in medicine, veterinary medicine, as well as other fields.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, üsküdar University, 34662 Istanbul, Turkey. mkonuk@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Tar is one example of a plant product used in folk medicine and it is obtained from Pinus nigra Arn. subsp. pallasiana (Lamb.) Holmboe, which is very common in the West Anatolian Region. Old trees that are good for kindling and have thick trucks are preferred to obtain tar. Tar is used not only as traditional medicine but also for protection against both endoparasites and ectoparasites. The objective of this study was to record the traditional method of obtaining tar and its usages in Afyonkarahisar which is located in the Western Anatolian Region of Turkey.

Methods: In order to record the traditional methods of obtaining tar, we visited the villages of Doğlat, Kürtyurdu and Çatağıl in Afyonkarahisar (Turkey) June-July, 2012. Ethnobotanical data about the method of collection and traditional usages of tar were obtained through informal interviews with 26 participants (16 men and 10 women). Data concerning the method of tar collection and its traditional usages were recorded and photographed.

Results: The traditional method for obtaining tar from Pinus nigra subsp. pallasiana by local people was recorded and the local usages (curing ear pain in children, osteomyelitis, wounds, ulcers, eczema, acne, alopecia, fungus, foot-and-mouth disease in animals, mouth sores in sheep and goats, protection against endo- and ectoparasites, repellent for snakes, mice, flies (Tabanus bovinus) and ticks, and the prevention of water leakage from roofs) of tar are described.

Conclusion: In this study, the traditional method for obtaining tar and the traditional usages of tar are explained. Documentation of the method of obtaining tar and its traditional usages may contribute to scientific research on the benefits and usages of tar in medicine, veterinary medicine, as well as other fields.

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Black pine gum.
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Figure 5: Black pine gum.

Mentions: Tar has also been traditionally used to cure osteomyelitis. One local patient suffering from chronic osteomyelitis had lumbar abscesses. The patient had undergone fourteen different operations at different hospitals. The muscles of this patient had been badly damaged and could not heal because of recurrent bacterial infections. The patient was unable to move. The patient’s family decided to apply traditionally prepared tar to the abscesses in order to give the patient some relief (Figures 3 and 4). Fifty g of black pine gum was rolled into a sterile cloth and heated in a container in order to soften it (Figures 5 and 6). Fifty mL of tar was combined with 50 g of black pine gum and placed on the wounds (Figure 7). The wounds were covered with a piece of cloth for 24 hours. There was some skin irritation with this treatment. This process was repeated 10 times, with 3 day breaks between each session. After the second session, the pus was gone from the wounds. Before the sessions, the patient was unable to rotate to the right of left. However, after the sessions the patient was able to walk and be more comfortable. This method has been used for other skin wounds (Figures 4 and 7). Tar is also used to cure ulcers. For ulcers, water which contains 5–10 drops of tar is drunk before meals and after 5 sessions, the treatment is finished. Tar has been used for skin diseases such as eczema, acne, alopecia and fungus by the local people (Table 1).


Traditional Tar Production from the Anatolian Black Pine [Pinus nigra Arn. subsp. pallasiana (Lamb.) Holmboe var. pallasiana] and its usages in Afyonkarahisar, Central Western Turkey.

Arı S, Kargıoğlu M, Temel M, Konuk M - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2014)

Black pine gum.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3974423&req=5

Figure 5: Black pine gum.
Mentions: Tar has also been traditionally used to cure osteomyelitis. One local patient suffering from chronic osteomyelitis had lumbar abscesses. The patient had undergone fourteen different operations at different hospitals. The muscles of this patient had been badly damaged and could not heal because of recurrent bacterial infections. The patient was unable to move. The patient’s family decided to apply traditionally prepared tar to the abscesses in order to give the patient some relief (Figures 3 and 4). Fifty g of black pine gum was rolled into a sterile cloth and heated in a container in order to soften it (Figures 5 and 6). Fifty mL of tar was combined with 50 g of black pine gum and placed on the wounds (Figure 7). The wounds were covered with a piece of cloth for 24 hours. There was some skin irritation with this treatment. This process was repeated 10 times, with 3 day breaks between each session. After the second session, the pus was gone from the wounds. Before the sessions, the patient was unable to rotate to the right of left. However, after the sessions the patient was able to walk and be more comfortable. This method has been used for other skin wounds (Figures 4 and 7). Tar is also used to cure ulcers. For ulcers, water which contains 5–10 drops of tar is drunk before meals and after 5 sessions, the treatment is finished. Tar has been used for skin diseases such as eczema, acne, alopecia and fungus by the local people (Table 1).

Bottom Line: The traditional method for obtaining tar from Pinus nigra subsp. pallasiana by local people was recorded and the local usages (curing ear pain in children, osteomyelitis, wounds, ulcers, eczema, acne, alopecia, fungus, foot-and-mouth disease in animals, mouth sores in sheep and goats, protection against endo- and ectoparasites, repellent for snakes, mice, flies (Tabanus bovinus) and ticks, and the prevention of water leakage from roofs) of tar are described.In this study, the traditional method for obtaining tar and the traditional usages of tar are explained.Documentation of the method of obtaining tar and its traditional usages may contribute to scientific research on the benefits and usages of tar in medicine, veterinary medicine, as well as other fields.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, üsküdar University, 34662 Istanbul, Turkey. mkonuk@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Tar is one example of a plant product used in folk medicine and it is obtained from Pinus nigra Arn. subsp. pallasiana (Lamb.) Holmboe, which is very common in the West Anatolian Region. Old trees that are good for kindling and have thick trucks are preferred to obtain tar. Tar is used not only as traditional medicine but also for protection against both endoparasites and ectoparasites. The objective of this study was to record the traditional method of obtaining tar and its usages in Afyonkarahisar which is located in the Western Anatolian Region of Turkey.

Methods: In order to record the traditional methods of obtaining tar, we visited the villages of Doğlat, Kürtyurdu and Çatağıl in Afyonkarahisar (Turkey) June-July, 2012. Ethnobotanical data about the method of collection and traditional usages of tar were obtained through informal interviews with 26 participants (16 men and 10 women). Data concerning the method of tar collection and its traditional usages were recorded and photographed.

Results: The traditional method for obtaining tar from Pinus nigra subsp. pallasiana by local people was recorded and the local usages (curing ear pain in children, osteomyelitis, wounds, ulcers, eczema, acne, alopecia, fungus, foot-and-mouth disease in animals, mouth sores in sheep and goats, protection against endo- and ectoparasites, repellent for snakes, mice, flies (Tabanus bovinus) and ticks, and the prevention of water leakage from roofs) of tar are described.

Conclusion: In this study, the traditional method for obtaining tar and the traditional usages of tar are explained. Documentation of the method of obtaining tar and its traditional usages may contribute to scientific research on the benefits and usages of tar in medicine, veterinary medicine, as well as other fields.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus