Limits...
Interaction between forest biodiversity and people's use of forest resources in Roviana, Solomon Islands: implications for biocultural conservation under socioeconomic changes.

Furusawa T, Sirikolo MQ, Sasaoka M, Ohtsuka R - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2014)

Bottom Line: Useful trees were found at high frequencies in the barrier island's primary forest (68.4%) and the main island's reserve (68.3%).Various useful tree species were found only in the reserve forest and seldom available in the urban village.Although the status of biodiversity in human-modified landscapes is not fully understood, this study suggested that traditional human modifications can positively affect biodiversity and that conservation programs should incorporate traditional uses of landscapes to be successful.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Asian and African Area Studies, Kyoto University, Room #AA431, Research Bldg, No, 2, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan. takuro.f@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: In Solomon Islands, forests have provided people with ecological services while being affected by human use and protection. This study used a quantitative ethnobotanical analysis to explore the society-forest interaction and its transformation in Roviana, Solomon Islands. We compared local plant and land uses between a rural village and urbanized village. Special attention was paid to how local people depend on biodiversity and how traditional human modifications of forest contribute to biodiversity conservation.

Methods: After defining locally recognized land-use classes, vegetation surveys were conducted in seven forest classes. For detailed observations of daily plant uses, 15 and 17 households were randomly selected in the rural and urban villages, respectively. We quantitatively documented the plant species that were used as food, medicine, building materials, and tools.

Results: The vegetation survey revealed that each local forest class represented a different vegetative community with relatively low similarity between communities. Although commercial logging operations and agriculture were both prohibited in the customary nature reserve, local people were allowed to cut down trees for their personal use and to take several types of non-timber forest products. Useful trees were found at high frequencies in the barrier island's primary forest (68.4%) and the main island's reserve (68.3%). Various useful tree species were found only in the reserve forest and seldom available in the urban village. In the rural village, customary governance and control over the use of forest resources by the local people still functioned.

Conclusions: Human modifications of the forest created unique vegetation communities, thus increasing biodiversity overall. Each type of forest had different species that varied in their levels of importance to the local subsistence lifestyle, and the villagers' behaviors, such as respect for forest reserves and the semidomestication of some species, contributed to conserving diversity. Urbanization threatened this human-forest interaction. Although the status of biodiversity in human-modified landscapes is not fully understood, this study suggested that traditional human modifications can positively affect biodiversity and that conservation programs should incorporate traditional uses of landscapes to be successful.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Locations of the study villages in the Roviana region, Solomon Islands. Map obtained from the USGS (2004). The global inset map was obtained from Wikipedia commons.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3974228&req=5

Figure 1: Locations of the study villages in the Roviana region, Solomon Islands. Map obtained from the USGS (2004). The global inset map was obtained from Wikipedia commons.

Mentions: This study was conducted in the Olive and Dunde villages in the Roviana region, Western Province, Solomon Islands (Figure 1). Roviana is located in the southwestern region of New Georgia Island and includes the nearby barrier islands, with an area extending 150 km from Koqu Kalena Bay to Munda. Almost all inhabitants in this area (pop. 14,805) speak the Roviana language and share the same ancestors and similar cultures, social institutions, and ecological conditions [30,31]. Munda, the fourth largest town in the country, is a commercial center with governmental stations and several villages.


Interaction between forest biodiversity and people's use of forest resources in Roviana, Solomon Islands: implications for biocultural conservation under socioeconomic changes.

Furusawa T, Sirikolo MQ, Sasaoka M, Ohtsuka R - J Ethnobiol Ethnomed (2014)

Locations of the study villages in the Roviana region, Solomon Islands. Map obtained from the USGS (2004). The global inset map was obtained from Wikipedia commons.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3974228&req=5

Figure 1: Locations of the study villages in the Roviana region, Solomon Islands. Map obtained from the USGS (2004). The global inset map was obtained from Wikipedia commons.
Mentions: This study was conducted in the Olive and Dunde villages in the Roviana region, Western Province, Solomon Islands (Figure 1). Roviana is located in the southwestern region of New Georgia Island and includes the nearby barrier islands, with an area extending 150 km from Koqu Kalena Bay to Munda. Almost all inhabitants in this area (pop. 14,805) speak the Roviana language and share the same ancestors and similar cultures, social institutions, and ecological conditions [30,31]. Munda, the fourth largest town in the country, is a commercial center with governmental stations and several villages.

Bottom Line: Useful trees were found at high frequencies in the barrier island's primary forest (68.4%) and the main island's reserve (68.3%).Various useful tree species were found only in the reserve forest and seldom available in the urban village.Although the status of biodiversity in human-modified landscapes is not fully understood, this study suggested that traditional human modifications can positively affect biodiversity and that conservation programs should incorporate traditional uses of landscapes to be successful.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Asian and African Area Studies, Kyoto University, Room #AA431, Research Bldg, No, 2, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan. takuro.f@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: In Solomon Islands, forests have provided people with ecological services while being affected by human use and protection. This study used a quantitative ethnobotanical analysis to explore the society-forest interaction and its transformation in Roviana, Solomon Islands. We compared local plant and land uses between a rural village and urbanized village. Special attention was paid to how local people depend on biodiversity and how traditional human modifications of forest contribute to biodiversity conservation.

Methods: After defining locally recognized land-use classes, vegetation surveys were conducted in seven forest classes. For detailed observations of daily plant uses, 15 and 17 households were randomly selected in the rural and urban villages, respectively. We quantitatively documented the plant species that were used as food, medicine, building materials, and tools.

Results: The vegetation survey revealed that each local forest class represented a different vegetative community with relatively low similarity between communities. Although commercial logging operations and agriculture were both prohibited in the customary nature reserve, local people were allowed to cut down trees for their personal use and to take several types of non-timber forest products. Useful trees were found at high frequencies in the barrier island's primary forest (68.4%) and the main island's reserve (68.3%). Various useful tree species were found only in the reserve forest and seldom available in the urban village. In the rural village, customary governance and control over the use of forest resources by the local people still functioned.

Conclusions: Human modifications of the forest created unique vegetation communities, thus increasing biodiversity overall. Each type of forest had different species that varied in their levels of importance to the local subsistence lifestyle, and the villagers' behaviors, such as respect for forest reserves and the semidomestication of some species, contributed to conserving diversity. Urbanization threatened this human-forest interaction. Although the status of biodiversity in human-modified landscapes is not fully understood, this study suggested that traditional human modifications can positively affect biodiversity and that conservation programs should incorporate traditional uses of landscapes to be successful.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus