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The clinical significance of occult HBV infection.

Squadrito G, Spinella R, Raimondo G - Ann Gastroenterol (2014)

Bottom Line: The presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative individuals is defined as occult HBV infection (OBI).OBI is related in some cases to infection with variant viruses (S-escape mutants) undetectable by HBsAg commercial kits.Moreover, much evidence suggests that it may contribute to the development of cirrhosis and may have an important role in hepatocarcinogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Clinical and Molecular Hepatology, University Hospital of Messina, Messina, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative individuals is defined as occult HBV infection (OBI). OBI is related in some cases to infection with variant viruses (S-escape mutants) undetectable by HBsAg commercial kits. More frequently, however, it is due to infection with wild-type viruses that are strongly suppressed in their replication activity. OBI may be involved in different clinical contexts, including the transmission of the infection by blood transfusion or liver transplantation and its acute reactivation when an immunosuppressive status occurs. Moreover, much evidence suggests that it may contribute to the development of cirrhosis and may have an important role in hepatocarcinogenesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of the possible clinical implications related to occult HBV infectionHCC, hepatocellular carcinoma; HBV, hepatitis B virus
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Figure 1: Schematic representation of the possible clinical implications related to occult HBV infectionHCC, hepatocellular carcinoma; HBV, hepatitis B virus

Mentions: OBI may be involved in many different clinical conditions that may be schematically summarized in four main contexts (Fig. 1): a) it can be transmitted (through blood transfusion and organ - mainly liver - transplantation), causing typical hepatitis B in newly infected individuals; b) the development of an immunosuppressive status (i.e., by immune-therapy) may induce OBI reactivation and development of acute and sometimes fulminant hepatitis; c) a large body of data suggests that OBI can contribute to the progression of the chronic liver disease toward cirrhosis, in particular in HCV-infected patients; and d) much evidence suggests that OBI can be involved in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development.


The clinical significance of occult HBV infection.

Squadrito G, Spinella R, Raimondo G - Ann Gastroenterol (2014)

Schematic representation of the possible clinical implications related to occult HBV infectionHCC, hepatocellular carcinoma; HBV, hepatitis B virus
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3959533&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic representation of the possible clinical implications related to occult HBV infectionHCC, hepatocellular carcinoma; HBV, hepatitis B virus
Mentions: OBI may be involved in many different clinical conditions that may be schematically summarized in four main contexts (Fig. 1): a) it can be transmitted (through blood transfusion and organ - mainly liver - transplantation), causing typical hepatitis B in newly infected individuals; b) the development of an immunosuppressive status (i.e., by immune-therapy) may induce OBI reactivation and development of acute and sometimes fulminant hepatitis; c) a large body of data suggests that OBI can contribute to the progression of the chronic liver disease toward cirrhosis, in particular in HCV-infected patients; and d) much evidence suggests that OBI can be involved in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development.

Bottom Line: The presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative individuals is defined as occult HBV infection (OBI).OBI is related in some cases to infection with variant viruses (S-escape mutants) undetectable by HBsAg commercial kits.Moreover, much evidence suggests that it may contribute to the development of cirrhosis and may have an important role in hepatocarcinogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Clinical and Molecular Hepatology, University Hospital of Messina, Messina, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative individuals is defined as occult HBV infection (OBI). OBI is related in some cases to infection with variant viruses (S-escape mutants) undetectable by HBsAg commercial kits. More frequently, however, it is due to infection with wild-type viruses that are strongly suppressed in their replication activity. OBI may be involved in different clinical contexts, including the transmission of the infection by blood transfusion or liver transplantation and its acute reactivation when an immunosuppressive status occurs. Moreover, much evidence suggests that it may contribute to the development of cirrhosis and may have an important role in hepatocarcinogenesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus